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PubMed Central Canada
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Open Access and PubMed Central Canada

Q & A Compiled from the Oct/Nov Webinar Series

  1. Will the cost for making publications open access need to come right off the top of the amount granted?
  2. You mentioned bilingualism - who is responsible for translation?
  3. Could you please clarify if review papers that are peer-reviewed can be archived in PMC Canada?
  4. Are grantees only expected to submit one paper per grant?
  5. How does a grantee check to see which of their manuscripts are already in PMC?
  6. Does PMC contain the full-text of all the articles in PubMed which are listed as having full-text available?
  7. Is it possible to submit the same manuscript to an institutional repository and PMC Canada simultaneously?
  8. The NIH has a requirement of a 12 month embargo, and I have noticed that this is reflected in most journal policies. Why does CIHR require a 6 month embargo?
  9. 6-months - is this from publication date IN PRINT or as of date available on-line ahead of print (ePub with DOI)?
  10. Does CIHR want investigators to attach FRNs to manuscripts prior to 2008?
  11. Will CIHR instruct reviewers to ignore papers that are not entered into PMC for future review of grant applications?
  12. Is this requirement retroactive to 2008, as these costs have not been awarded in previously funded grants? We have a few papers over the past two years and the cost for open access would be quite high.
  13. If the CIHR grant was awarded prior to Jan 1 2008, does this mean that submission to PMC is not required at all, or is only required for those papers arising from the grant that are published after 2008?
  14. Do you anticipate having a line item in future grants applications in which this can be costed? This would limit potential issues related to taxing the research expendable component.
  15. I'm not clear if material deposited in PMCC goes automatically in PMC- does "mirror out" mean it's fully available on all sites?
  16. So only articles/manuscripts produced as a result of CIHR funding can be submitted... or can a CIHR funded researcher submit articles produced as a result of projects funded by other funders (i.e., Ontario Ministry of Health, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health)?
  17. Can you enter more than one CIHR grant number if a paper arose from a collaboration or was funded by more than one CIHR grant held by a PI?
  18. Will there be MeSH indexing to facilitate searching at PMCC or is it just full text searching / author provided keywords?
  19. What about if I deposited a manuscript in PMC USA because my collaborator was NIH funded? Do I need to deposit that again in PMC Canada?
  20. What if a paper submitted to PubMed Central Canada violates copyright - who gets sued?
  21. There is often a box found on publication agreements asking whether the publication stems from an NIH funded grant. Is CIHR working with publishers to identify CIHR-funded research on publication agreements (for the purposes of policy compliance and publisher awareness)?
  22. If we have submitted to an open access journal, should we also submit/upload the article through PMC Canada, or is that automatic?
  23. In terms of future directions, what are your plans for collaborating with other institutional repositories?
  24. PMC in the United States has a requirement that all articles be submitted in XML format. Is this not a requirement in PMC Canada?
  25. Can you clarify how PMCC is uniquely different from PMC and PMCUK? You touched on this a bit, but it is still a bit unclear.
  26. You mentioned that recipients of CIHR training awards cannot submit to PMC yet. How about recipients of CIHR Salary Awards for professors? How about recipients of older CIHR grants that were awarded before 2008?
  27. Could you please elaborate on the data harvesting - would you be able to get information on # of institutional submissions in a year for example?
  28. If a journal is not open access and does not allow the manuscript to be deposited into a repository, how do we report the exception to CIHR other than through progress reports?
  29. Some of the large publishers (i.e., Wiley, Elsevier, Springer) either have no open access policies or a 12-month embargo period that complies with NIH but would not for CIHR. Are there plans to negotiate with these publishers to change their embargo period?
  30. When do you anticipate including articles that resulted due to funding from other funding agencies?
  31. If a CIHR-funded paper has already been published in a closed journal and the original CIHR grant proposal did not include accommodation for the open access fee, what options are available for the author if the journal does not grant him or her the right to archive the paper (which presumably would rule out PMCC)?
  32. With respect to research articles in non-PubMed journals, did you say that acceptance in PMC Canada depended on the entire journal being accepted for PubMed indexing?

  1. Will the cost for making publications open access need to come right off the top of the amount granted?

    This is a Tri-Agency policy and peer-review committees are aware of grantee obligations to comply and know that this is considered an allowable expense within the grant budget. Dissemination of research is considered a critical component of the research process, and for this reason, is an eligible cost within the grant budget. When authoring multiple publications stemming from the same grant, all publications must be made openly accessible. Given the potential open access publication fees incurred in this scenario, it may not be feasible within the budget of the original grant to cover all of these publication costs. In this situation, CIHR encourages grantees to consider option #2 of the policy (archiving in a repository like PMC Canada) as a more financially feasible route.

  2. You mentioned bilingualism - who is responsible for translation?

    With respect to PMC Canada, bilingualism refers to the PMCC interface and help desk support. All submissions to PMC Canada are displayed on the site in the language of submission. We do not translate the content of research publications.

  3. Could you please clarify if review papers that are peer-reviewed can be archived in PMC Canada?

    All peer-reviewed content (articles, editorials, reviews, etc.) resulting from a CIHR grant, and in compliance with CIHR's Policy on Access to Research Outputs, is acceptable for submission to PMC Canada.

    Please be aware that you DO NOT need to deposit your review paper into PMC Canada if any of the following conditions apply:

    • The article is already freely available on the Internet (i.e., the publisher's Web site) within six months of publication;
    • The article is already in PMC;
    • You have paid an open access fee;
    • The journal in which your research was published has an automatic deposit agreement with PMC. Such journals are identified as having a participation level of "Full" on the PMC Journal list at http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/fprender.cgi?lang=en-ca.

    If you try to submit a manuscript from a journal that has an automatic deposit agreement with PMC, the PMC Canada Manuscript Submission System will provide the following notice:

    "PMC receives articles for the journal [journal name] directly from the publisher. Please use Grant reporting to assign your grants to the article."

    Please note that in ALL of the above cases, you will need to associate your manuscript with the CIHR grant number that supported your research by logging in to the PMC Canada Manuscript Submission System and using the "Grants Reporting" feature.

  4. Are grantees only expected to submit one paper per grant?

    For all grants awarded as of January 1, 2008, grant recipients are required to make every effort to ensure that their peer-reviewed publications are freely accessible. This applies to all publications stemming from CIHR-funded research grants.

  5. How does a grantee check to see which of their manuscripts are already in PMC?

    A grantee can find out whether their manuscript has already been deposited into PMC in two ways: by searching the PMC Web site prior to beginning the PMC Canada manuscript submission process, or during the manuscript submission process itself.

    1. To search PMC (U.S.) directly, go to http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/. Please be sure to include embargoed articles in your search by taking the following steps:

      1. In the "Search" box, type the identifying information for your article (i.e., author name, manuscript title, journal title, etc.);
      2. Select the "Search all articles" radio button;
      3. Click the "Advanced Search" link (which will take you to the "PMC Home" page);
      4. Click the "Limits" tab near the top of the "PMC Home" page;
      5. Select the "Show both free and embargoed articles" option in the "Include Embargoed Articles in search result?" area.

    2. During the PMC Canada manuscript submission process, you will be asked to enter the name of your manuscript in the "Manuscript Title" box. If your article is already in PMC, you will see an "Already in PMC" notice.

    If the manuscript is already in PMC, the grantee should access the PMC Canada Submission System using their username and password. Once in the system, the grantee can retrieve the manuscript by searching for it and attach the CIHR grant number to it by using the "Grants Reporting" feature.

  6. Does PMC contain the full-text of all the articles in PubMed which are listed as having full-text available?

    No. When you click a full-text link in PubMed, you leave PubMed and are directed to the full-text at an external provider's site. External providers range from PMC to publisher Web sites.

    For more information on obtaining the full-text of an article (when available) whose citation appears in PubMed, please consult the "How to Get the Journal Article" section of the "PubMed Help Guide" at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK3827/#pubmedhelp.How_to_Get_the_Journ.

  7. Is it possible to submit the same manuscript to an institutional repository and PMC Canada simultaneously?

    At this time, it is not possible to submit simultaneously. However, please note that from a compliance perspective, so long as the final peer-reviewed manuscript is posted in either PMC Canada or an institutional repository, CIHR will view the deposit as complaint with their policy.

  8. The NIH has a requirement of a 12 month embargo, and I have noticed that this is reflected in most journal policies. Why does CIHR require a 6 month embargo?

    International momentum for open access is generally geared towards a 6 month time frame. The NIH initially attempted 6 month voluntary deposit for their policy, but due to lack of compliance from grantees and a strong lobby by publishers, they compromised with 12 month mandatory deposit. This no doubt makes it challenging for CIHR's 6 month policy, given that publishers are inclined to align with the NIH's 12 month timeframe. However, there is strong indication that pressure from the Obama administration and the review of Bill H.R. 5037 will see a push for funding agencies (including the NIH) to establish policies mandating 6 month deposition. Most health funders in the UK have adopted a policy of 6 months for open access, and CIHR is satisfied that the time frame outlined in our policy is appropriate. We recognize that there is still a lot of work to be done, but don't anticipate lengthening the term of the policy beyond 6 months.

  9. 6-months - is this from publication date IN PRINT or as of date available on-line ahead of print (ePub with DOI)?

    This refers to publication date in print.

  10. Does CIHR want investigators to attach FRNs to manuscripts prior to 2008?

    While it is not a requirement to attach FRNs to manuscripts prior to 2008, it is a recommended practice.

  11. Will CIHR instruct reviewers to ignore papers that are not entered into PMC for future review of grant applications?

    Currently, reviewers are not evaluating applications based on policy compliance for previous grants.

  12. Is this requirement retroactive to 2008, as these costs have not been awarded in previously funded grants? We have a few papers over the past two years and the cost for open access would be quite high.

    The policy applies only to grants awarded as of January 1, 2008 and onwards. Any grants awarded prior to policy implementation are not obliged to meet policy requirements. However, CIHR does encourage those receiving grants prior to policy implementation to make their publications openly accessible. Given the possible costs associated with publishing in an open access journal, grantees should consider archiving in PubMed Central Canada as a cost neutral option.

  13. If the CIHR grant was awarded prior to Jan 1 2008, does this mean that submission to PMC is not required at all, or is only required for those papers arising from grants that are published after 2008?

    CIHR encourages those receiving grants prior to policy implementation (January 2008) to make their publications openly accessible. Given the possible costs associated with publishing in an open access journal, grantees should consider archiving in PubMed Central Canada as a cost neutral option. We hope that researchers will see open access dissemination of the research results as an integral part of the research process and as an opportunity to make their research broadly available.

  14. Do you anticipate having a line item in future grant applications in which this can be costed? This would limit potential issues related to taxing the research expendable component.

    All CIHR grant applicants are asked to include publication-related expenses in their budget proposals, including fees associated with open access publications. Given the lag time between when a grant is awarded, the research conducted and a publication produced, the situation may arise where all grant funds are spent, without having firmly earmarked money for fees related to open access. CIHR is working to establish communications that would go out to grantees two-thirds of the way through their grant, reminding them of their obligation to comply with the policy and encouraging them to safeguard grant funds for open access fees should they wish to publish in an open access journal. Of course, grantees can always elect option #2 of the Policy on Access to Research Outputs and archive in PMC Canada, which requires no fee.

  15. I'm not clear if material deposited in PMCC goes automatically in PMC - does "mirror out" mean it's fully available on all sites?

    Yes, it will automatically be in both PubMed Central and UKPMC.

  16. So only articles/manuscripts produced as a result of CIHR funding can be submitted... or can a CIHR funded researcher submit articles produced as a result of projects funded by other funders (i.e., Ontario Ministry of Health, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health)?

    For the time being, only those grants funded by CIHR in part or in whole are eligible for deposit in PMC Canada. We expect to expand eligibility in the near future by partnering with other Canadian health research funders.

  17. Can you enter more than one CIHR grant number if a paper arose from a collaboration or was funded by more than one CIHR grant held by a PI?

    Yes, it is possible to attach more than one CIHR grant number to a manuscript.

  18. Will there be MeSH indexing to facilitate searching at PMCC or is it just full text searching / author provided keywords?

    No, not at this time.

  19. What about if I deposited a manuscript in PMC USA because my collaborator was NIH funded. Do I need to deposit that again in PMC Canada?

    No, but you should attach your CIHR grant number to that article using the grant reporting tool.

  20. What if a paper submitted to PubMed Central Canada violates copyright - who gets sued?

    Generally speaking, when you upload your manuscript to PMCC you are responsible for ensuring that you are meeting copyright requirements. If an author violates their copyright agreement, we may receive a take-down notice from the publisher, in which case we will remove the manuscript from the PMC Canada Web site.

  21. There is often a box found on publication agreements asking whether the publication stems from an NIH funded grant. Is CIHR working with publishers to identify CIHR-funded research on publication agreements (for the purposes of policy compliance and publisher awareness)?

    CIHR is working to build awareness amongst publishers of our open access policy. It may take time before we see this reflected in publication agreements. In the meantime, however, grantees can negotiate with publishers to retain their right to archive in PMC Canada in compliance with CIHR's policy. This can be done through the use of a publication addendum or by inserting the following text into the publishing agreement:

    Journal acknowledges that the researcher will be entitled to deposit an electronic copy of the final, peer-reviewed manuscript for inclusion in PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada), and for this manuscript to be mirrored to PMC and all PMC International sites. Manuscripts deposited with PMC Canada (and PMC and PMC International sites) may be made freely available to the public, via the internet, within six months of the official date of final publication in the journal.

    If authors are unsuccessful in retaining the right to archive, CIHR will view this as a reasonable exception, however some authors may wish to reconsider where they submit their manuscript in the future.

  22. If we have submitted to an open access journal, should we also submit/upload the article through PMC Canada, or is that automatic?

    No. Publication of your manuscript by an open access journal does not guarantee automatic deposit into PMC. Some open access journals do automatically deposit their complete contents into PMC, but not all. A list of those journals can be found at http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/fprender.cgi. Simply search for your journal title in the "Search for journals or articles" box.

    If your journal automatically deposits their complete contents into PMC, you will still need to associate your CIHR grant number with your manuscript using the "Grants Reporting" feature in the PMC Canada Manuscript Submission System.

  23. In terms of future directions, what are your plans for collaborating with other institutional repositories?

    PMC Canada is already OAI-PMH compliant which means that data can be harvested by other digital repositories. OAI-PMH stands for Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting and more information on this is available at: http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/ppmc-localhtml/about-oai.shtml.

    NRC-CISTI and the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) have been discussing the possibility of simultaneous deposit through the SWORD protocol (Simple Web Service Offering Repository Deposit). We would like to work together to explore the feasibility of implementing this option as there are both technical and rights implications associated with it.

  24. PMC in the United States has a requirement that all articles be submitted in XML format. Is this not a requirement in PMC Canada?

    It is not required to submit in XML format. PubMed Central Canada takes care of the file format.

  25. Can you clarify how PMCC is uniquely different from PMC and PMCUK? You touched on this a bit, but it is still a bit unclear.

    PMC Canada and UKPMC make up the PubMed Central International (PMCI) network and are based on PubMed Central (PMC) in the US. The content is mostly the same from one site to the other. The unique difference is the manuscript submission system for each site. In Canada at the moment only CIHR funded research can be submitted to PMC Canada. The submitted manuscripts are then mirrored to the other two sites, UKPMC and PMC (US).

  26. You mentioned that recipients of CIHR training awards cannot submit to PMC yet. How about recipients of CIHR Salary Awards for professors? How about recipients of older CIHR grants that were awarded before 2008?

    Recipients of CIHR training and salary awards are not required to comply with CIHR's Policy on Access to Research Outputs, but they can still submit manuscripts stemming from their award to PMC Canada. To do this, they will need to first contact CIHR to provide their consent to share basic personal information with NRC-CISTI. Positive consent then triggers an automatic email to you with your PMC Canada user ID and temporary password, allowing you to log in and begin using your account. While it is not mandated to submit manuscripts stemming from grants awarded prior to January 1, 2008, we encourage grantees to do so.

    To contact CIHR to provide consent and receive your PMC Canada account info, contact: 613-954-1968, Toll Free: 1-888-603-4178 (press 1), or email: info@cihr-irsc.gc.ca.

  27. Could you please elaborate on the data harvesting - would you be able to get information on # of institutional submissions in a year for example?

    We do not have the capacity to do this at this time, but hope to build in related grant reporting functionality over time.

  28. If a journal is not open access and does not allow the manuscript to be deposited into a repository, how do we report the exception to CIHR other than through progress reports?

    There are a relatively small number of publishers with policies that require authors to assign and transfer copyrights to the publication to the publishers. CIHR has prepared a chart called Adhering with the CIHR Policy on Access to Research Outputs - Selected Journals that presents a sample of high-impact journals that are adherent with CIHR's policy.

    CIHR respects the authors' right to choose the appropriate journal for publishing their research results, however we would encourage authors to make an effort to retain key rights (e.g., archiving manuscripts). If authors are unsuccessful in retaining the right to archive, CIHR will view this as a reasonable exception, however some authors may wish to reconsider where they submit their manuscript in the future. In this circumstance, we ask grantees to contact CIHR at access@cihr-irsc.gc.ca to report their efforts to comply with the policy and the subsequent challenges in meeting this obligation.

  29. Some of the large publishers (i.e., Wiley, Elsevier, Springer) either have no open access policies or a 12-month embargo period that complies with NIH but would not for CIHR. Are there plans to negotiate with these publishers to change their embargo period?

    CIHR intends to work with publishers to create awareness of our open access policy and to negotiate publisher policy changes that will allow CIHR researches to comply with their policy obligations. We have already worked with Nature Publishing to establish bulk deposits for any CIHR-funded research published by Nature and continue to connect with other publishers to pursue this option of bulk deposits. This process of publisher negotiation will take time.

  30. When do you anticipate including articles that resulted due to funding from other funding agencies?

    Currently the PMC Canada team is working on completing Phase 2 development which includes improvements to the web front end of the search interface as well as adding enhanced reporting features for funders and users. In parallel to this activity we are looking to begin discussions with other Canadian health research funders with public access policies who would be interested in joining PMC Canada.

  31. If a CIHR-funded paper has already been published in a closed journal and the original CIHR grant proposal did not include accommodation for the open access fee, what options are available for the author if the journal does not grant him or her the right to archive the paper (which presumably would rule out PMCC)?

    This is a relatively rare occurrence. If authors are unsuccessful in retaining the right to archive by negotiating an addendum to their original publication agreement, CIHR will view this as a reasonable exception, however authors may wish to reconsider where they submit their manuscript in the future. In this circumstance, we ask grantees to contact CIHR at access@cihr-irsc.gc.ca to report their efforts to comply with the policy and the subsequent challenges in meeting this obligation.

  32. With respect to research articles in non-PubMed journals, did you say that acceptance in PMC Canada depended on the entire journal being accepted for PubMed indexing?

    No. Indexing in PubMed is not a prerequisite for a journal's acceptance by PMC Canada. You can deposit your manuscript even if your journal has not been indexed in PubMed. The PMC Canada Manuscript Submission System has a journal-matching feature to help you quickly locate the journal that has accepted your manuscript for publication. If your journal is not recognized (i.e., it does not appear in the journal-matching feature), please type in the full name of the journal. All CIHR-funded research from peer-reviewed publications (even if initially unrecognized by the Manuscript Submission System) will be accepted for deposit and published in PMC Canada. Please note, however, that processing material from an unrecognized journal may involve additional delays.

 


PubMed Central Canada is a service of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) working in partnership with the National Research Council's Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (NRC-CISTI) in cooperation with the National Center for Biotechnology Information at the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NCBI/NLM). It includes content provided to the PubMed Central International archive by participating publishers.