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1.  Postdiagnostic Statin Use and the Risk of Lethal Prostate Cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study 
Background
Observational studies suggest potential chemopreventive benefits of statins on prostate cancer outcomes, but data on the impact of postdiagnostic use are sparse.
Methods
We examined the association of postdiagnostic statin use and risk of lethal prostate cancer (metastases or prostate cancer death, N = 242) among 3,949 men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study between 1992 and 2008 and followed through 2010 (33,302 person years). We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for age, time period, time from diagnosis to questionnaire, body mass index, vigorous physical activity, smoking, aspirin use, clinical stage, PSA at diagnosis, Gleason score, primary treatment, and comorbidities.
Results
We found no statistically significant association between postdiagnostic current use of statins or duration of statin usage and the outcome of lethal prostate cancer [N = 242 cases; multivariate HR = 0.97 (95% CI, 0.72–1.31) for current use yes/no; HR = 0.85 (95% CI, 0.59–1.22) for 1 to 5 years of use, 0.96 (95% CI, 0.66–1.38) for 6+ years of use vs. never use].
Conclusions
We observed little evidence that statin usage after diagnosis of localized prostate cancer reduces risk of progression to metastatic disease or prostate cancer–specific death.
Impact
These results do not support statins as a chemopreventive agent for prostate cancer progression.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0671
PMCID: PMC4735873  PMID: 26189767
2.  Survival Among Patients With Pancreatic Cancer and Long-Standing or Recent-Onset Diabetes Mellitus 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2014;33(1):29-35.
Purpose
Long-standing diabetes is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and recent-onset diabetes in the several years before diagnosis is a consequence of subclinical pancreatic malignancy. However, the impact of diabetes on survival is largely unknown.
Patients and Methods
We analyzed survival by diabetes status among 1,006 patients diagnosed from 1986 to 2010 from two prospective cohort studies: the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). We validated our results among 386 patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2013 from a clinic-based case series at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death using Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, diagnosis year, and cancer stage.
Results
In NHS and HPFS, HR for death was 1.40 (95% CI, 1.15 to 1.69) for patients with long-term diabetes (> 4 years) compared with those without diabetes (P < .001), with median survival times of 3 months for long-term diabetics and 5 months for nondiabetics. Adjustment for a propensity score to reduce confounding by comorbidities did not change the results. Among DFCI patient cases, HR for death was 1.53 (95% CI, 1.07 to 2.20) for those with long-term diabetes compared with those without diabetes (P = .02), with median survival times of 9 months for long-term diabetics and 13 months for nondiabetics. Compared with nondiabetics, survival times were shorter for long-term diabetics who used oral hypoglycemics or insulin. We observed no statistically significant association of recent-onset diabetes (< 4 years) with survival.
Conclusion
Long-standing diabetes was associated with statistically significantly decreased survival among patients with pancreatic cancer enrolled onto three longitudinal studies.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2014.57.5688
PMCID: PMC4268250  PMID: 25403204
3.  Prediagnostic Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Pancreatic Cancer Survival 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2016;34(24):2899-2905.
Purpose
Although vitamin D inhibits pancreatic cancer proliferation in laboratory models, the association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with patient survival is largely unexplored.
Patients and Methods
We analyzed survival among 493 patients from five prospective US cohorts who were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer from 1984 to 2008. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death by plasma level of 25(OH)D (insufficient, < 20 ng/mL; relative insufficiency, 20 to < 30 ng/mL; sufficient ≥ 30 ng/mL) by using Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age, cohort, race and ethnicity, smoking, diagnosis year, stage, and blood collection month. We also evaluated 30 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene, requiring P < .002 (0.05 divided by 30 genotyped variants) for statistical significance.
Results
Mean prediagnostic plasma level of 25(OH)D was 24.6 ng/mL, and 165 patients (33%) were vitamin D insufficient. Compared with patients with insufficient levels, multivariable-adjusted HRs for death were 0.79 (95% CI, 0.48 to 1.29) for patients with relative insufficiency and 0.66 (95% CI, 0.49 to 0.90) for patients with sufficient levels (P trend = .01). These results were unchanged after further adjustment for body mass index and history of diabetes (P trend = .02). The association was strongest among patients with blood collected within 5 years of diagnosis, with an HR of 0.58 (95% CI, 0.35 to 0.98) comparing patients with sufficient to patients with insufficient 25(OH)D levels. No single-nucleotide polymorphism at the vitamin D receptor gene met our corrected significance threshold of P < .002; rs7299460 was most strongly associated with survival (HR per minor allele, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.95; P = .01).
Conclusion
We observed longer overall survival in patients with pancreatic cancer who had sufficient prediagnostic plasma levels of 25(OH)D.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2015.66.3005
PMCID: PMC5012662  PMID: 27325858
4.  Physical activity and prostate tumor vessel morphology: data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study 
Vigorous activity is associated with lower risk of prostate cancer progression, but the biologic mechanisms are unknown. Exercise affects vascularization of tumors in animal models, and small, irregularly shaped vessels in prostate tumors are associated with fatal prostate cancer. We hypothesized that men who engaged in vigorous activity or brisk walking would have larger, more regularly shaped vessels in their prostate tumors. We prospectively examined whether physical activity was associated with prostate tumor microvessel morphology among 571 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study using ordinal logistic regression. Vessel size (μm2), vessel lumen regularity (perimeter2 / 4 · Π · area), and microvessel density (number per high powered field) were ascertained in tumor sections stained for endothelial cell marker CD34. Vigorous activity [metabolic equivalent task (MET) ≥ 6], non-vigorous activity (MET <6), and walking pace were assessed a median of 14 months prior to diagnosis. Prostate tumors from men who reported a brisk walking pace (3+ mph) had larger, more regularly shaped blood vessels compared to those of men who walked at a less than brisk pace [vessel regularity odds ratio (OR): 1.59; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11, 2.27; p-value: 0.01; vessel size OR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.12; p-value: 0.03]. Brisk walking was not associated with microvessel density; total vigorous and non-vigorous activities were not associated with vessel size, shape, or number. Brisk walking may be associated with larger, more regularly shaped vessels in prostate tumors. Additional research elucidating the effect of physical activity on prostate tumor biology is needed.
doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-15-0132
PMCID: PMC4596787  PMID: 26276753
physical activity; angiogenesis; vasculature; prostate cancer; blood vessels
5.  Vasectomy and Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer: A 24-Year Follow-Up Study 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2014;32(27):3033-3038.
Purpose
Conflicting reports remain regarding the association between vasectomy, a common form of male contraception in the United States, and prostate cancer risk. We examined prospectively this association with extended follow-up and an emphasis on advanced and lethal disease.
Patients and Methods
Among 49,405 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, age 40 to 75 years at baseline in 1986, 6,023 patients with prostate cancer were diagnosed during the follow-up to 2010, including 811 lethal cases. In total, 12,321 men (25%) had vasectomies. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the relative risk (RR) and 95% CIs of total, advanced, high-grade, and lethal disease, with adjustment for a variety of possible confounders.
Results
Vasectomy was associated with a small increased risk of prostate cancer overall (RR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.17). Risk was elevated for high-grade (Gleason score 8 to 10; RR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.45) and lethal disease (death or distant metastasis; RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.43). Among a subcohort of men receiving regular prostate-specific antigen screening, the association with lethal cancer was stronger (RR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.03 to 2.36). Vasectomy was not associated with the risk of low-grade or localized disease. Additional analyses suggested that the associations were not driven by differences in sex hormone levels, sexually transmitted infections, or cancer treatment.
Conclusion
Our data support the hypothesis that vasectomy is associated with a modest increased incidence of lethal prostate cancer. The results do not appear to be due to detection bias, and confounding by infections or cancer treatment is unlikely.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2013.54.8446
PMCID: PMC4162499  PMID: 25002716
6.  Citrus Consumption and Risk of Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2015;33(23):2500-2508.
Purpose
Citrus products are widely consumed foods that are rich in psoralens and furocoumarins, a group of naturally occurring chemicals with potential photocarcinogenic properties. We prospectively evaluated the risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma associated with citrus consumption.
Methods
A total of 63,810 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1984 to 2010) and 41,622 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986 to 2010) were included. Dietary information was repeatedly assessed every 2 to 4 years during follow-up. Incident melanoma cases were identified through self-report and confirmed by pathologic records.
Results
Over 24 to 26 years of follow-up, we documented 1,840 incident melanomas. After adjustment for other risk factors, the pooled multivariable hazard ratios for melanoma were 1.00 for overall citrus consumption < twice per week (reference), 1.10 (95% CI, 0.94 to 1.30) for two to four times per week, 1.26 (95% CI, 1.08 to 1.47) for five to six times per week, 1.27 (95% CI, 1.09 to 1.49) for once to 1.5 times per day, and 1.36 (95% CI, 1.14 to 1.63) for ≥ 1.6 times per day (Ptrend < .001). Among individual citrus products, grapefruit showed the most apparent association with risk of melanoma, which was independent of other lifestyle and dietary factors. The pooled multivariable hazard ratio for melanoma comparing the extreme consumption categories of grapefruit (≥ three times per week v never) was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.10 to 1.82; Ptrend < .001).
Conclusion
Citrus consumption was associated with an increased risk of malignant melanoma in two cohorts of women and men. Nevertheless, further investigation is needed to confirm our findings and explore related health implications.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2014.57.4111
PMCID: PMC4979231  PMID: 26124488
7.  Personal History of Prostate Cancer and Increased Risk of Incident Melanoma in the United States 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2013;31(35):4394-4399.
Purpose
Steroid hormones, particularly androgens, play a major role in prostatic carcinogenesis. Personal history of severe acne, a surrogate for higher androgen activity, has been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), and one recent study indicated that severe teenage acne was a novel risk factor for melanoma. These findings suggest a possible relationship between PCa and risk of melanoma. We prospectively evaluated this association among US men.
Methods
A total of 42,372 participants in the Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study (HPFS; 1986 to 2010) were included. Biennially self-reported PCa diagnosis was confirmed using pathology reports. Diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was self-reported biennially, and diagnosis of melanoma was pathologically confirmed. We sought to confirm the association in 18,603 participants from the Physicians' Health Study (PHS; 1982 to 1998).
Results
We identified 539 melanomas in the HPFS. Personal history of PCa was associated with an increased risk of melanoma (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.54). Although we also detected a marginally increased risk of NMSC associated with PCa (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.995 to 1.16), the difference in the magnitude of the association between melanoma and NMSC was significant (P for heterogeneity = .002). We did not find an altered risk of melanoma associated with personal history of other cancers. The association between PCa and risk of incident melanoma was confirmed in the PHS (HR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.12 to 4.21).
Conclusion
Personal history of PCa is associated with an increased risk of melanoma, which may not be entirely a result of greater medical scrutiny.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2013.51.1915
PMCID: PMC3842907  PMID: 24190118
8.  Prediagnostic Body Mass Index and Pancreatic Cancer Survival 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2013;31(33):4229-4234.
Purpose
Although obesity is associated with increased incidence of pancreatic cancer, studies have not prospectively evaluated prediagnostic body mass index (BMI) and survival.
Patients and Methods
We analyzed survival by prediagnostic BMI assessed in 1986 among 902 patients from two large prospective cohorts diagnosed from 1988 to 2010. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death using Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, diagnosis year, and stage. We evaluated the temporal association of BMI with survival by grouping reported BMI by 2-year lag-time intervals before diagnosis.
Results
The multivariable-adjusted HR for death was 1.53 (95% CI, 1.11 to 2.09) comparing patients with BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 with those with BMI < 25 kg/m2 (P trend = .001), which was similar after adjustment for stage. The association of BMI with survival was stronger with longer lag times between reported BMI and cancer diagnosis. Among patients with BMI collected 18 to 20 years before diagnosis, HR for death was 2.31 (95% CI, 1.48 to 3.61; P trend < .001), comparing obese with healthy-weight patients. No statistically significant differences were seen by cohort, smoking status, or stage, although the association was stronger among never-smokers (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.01 to 2.57; P trend = .002) than ever-smokers (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.86 to 2.15; P trend = .63), comparing BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2 with BMI < 25 kg/m2. Higher prediagnostic BMI was associated with more advanced stage at diagnosis, with 72.5% of obese patients presenting with metastatic disease versus 59.4% of healthy-weight patients (P = .02).
Conclusion
Higher prediagnostic BMI was associated with statistically significantly decreased survival among patients with pancreatic cancer from two large prospective cohorts.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2013.51.7532
PMCID: PMC3821012  PMID: 24145341
9.  Vitamin D Receptor Protein Expression in Tumor Tissue and Prostate Cancer Progression 
Journal of Clinical Oncology  2011;29(17):2378-2385.
Purpose
Data suggest that circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] interacts with the vitamin D receptor (VDR) to decrease proliferation and increase apoptosis for some malignancies, although evidence for prostate cancer is less clear. How VDR expression in tumor tissue may influence prostate cancer progression has not been evaluated in large studies.
Patients and Methods
We examined protein expression of VDR in tumor tissue among 841 patients with prostate cancer in relation to risk of lethal prostate cancer within two prospective cohorts, the Physicians' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. We also examined the association of VDR expression with prediagnostic circulating 25(OH)D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels and with two VDR single nucleotide polymorphisms, FokI and BsmI.
Results
Men whose tumors had high VDR expression had significantly lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis (P for trend < .001), lower Gleason score (P for trend < .001), and less advanced tumor stage (P for trend < .001) and were more likely to have tumors harboring the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion (P for trend = .009). Compared with the lowest quartile, men whose tumors had the highest VDR expression had significantly reduced risk of lethal prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 0.17; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.41). This association was only slightly attenuated after adjustment for Gleason score and PSA at diagnosis (HR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.83) or, additionally, for tumor stage (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.94). Neither prediagnostic plasma vitamin D levels nor VDR polymorphisms were associated with VDR expression.
Conclusion
High VDR expression in prostate tumors is associated with a reduced risk of lethal cancer, suggesting a role of the vitamin D pathway in prostate cancer progression.
doi:10.1200/JCO.2010.30.9880
PMCID: PMC3107752  PMID: 21537045
10.  Assessing Risk Prediction Models Using Individual Participant Data From Multiple Studies 
Pennells, Lisa | Kaptoge, Stephen | White, Ian R. | Thompson, Simon G. | Wood, Angela M. | Tipping, Robert W. | Folsom, Aaron R. | Couper, David J. | Ballantyne, Christie M. | Coresh, Josef | Goya Wannamethee, S. | Morris, Richard W. | Kiechl, Stefan | Willeit, Johann | Willeit, Peter | Schett, Georg | Ebrahim, Shah | Lawlor, Debbie A. | Yarnell, John W. | Gallacher, John | Cushman, Mary | Psaty, Bruce M. | Tracy, Russ | Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne | Price, Jackie F. | Lee, Amanda J. | McLachlan, Stela | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Wareham, Nicholas J. | Brenner, Hermann | Schöttker, Ben | Müller, Heiko | Jansson, Jan-Håkan | Wennberg, Patrik | Salomaa, Veikko | Harald, Kennet | Jousilahti, Pekka | Vartiainen, Erkki | Woodward, Mark | D'Agostino, Ralph B. | Bladbjerg, Else-Marie | Jørgensen, Torben | Kiyohara, Yutaka | Arima, Hisatomi | Doi, Yasufumi | Ninomiya, Toshiharu | Dekker, Jacqueline M. | Nijpels, Giel | Stehouwer, Coen D. A. | Kauhanen, Jussi | Salonen, Jukka T. | Meade, Tom W. | Cooper, Jackie A. | Cushman, Mary | Folsom, Aaron R. | Psaty, Bruce M. | Shea, Steven | Döring, Angela | Kuller, Lewis H. | Grandits, Greg | Gillum, Richard F. | Mussolino, Michael | Rimm, Eric B. | Hankinson, Sue E. | Manson, JoAnn E. | Pai, Jennifer K. | Kirkland, Susan | Shaffer, Jonathan A. | Shimbo, Daichi | Bakker, Stephan J. L. | Gansevoort, Ron T. | Hillege, Hans L. | Amouyel, Philippe | Arveiler, Dominique | Evans, Alun | Ferrières, Jean | Sattar, Naveed | Westendorp, Rudi G. | Buckley, Brendan M. | Cantin, Bernard | Lamarche, Benoît | Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth | Wingard, Deborah L. | Bettencourt, Richele | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Aspelund, Thor | Sigurdsson, Gunnar | Thorsson, Bolli | Kavousi, Maryam | Witteman, Jacqueline C. | Hofman, Albert | Franco, Oscar H. | Howard, Barbara V. | Zhang, Ying | Best, Lyle | Umans, Jason G. | Onat, Altan | Sundström, Johan | Michael Gaziano, J. | Stampfer, Meir | Ridker, Paul M. | Michael Gaziano, J. | Ridker, Paul M. | Marmot, Michael | Clarke, Robert | Collins, Rory | Fletcher, Astrid | Brunner, Eric | Shipley, Martin | Kivimäki, Mika | Ridker, Paul M. | Buring, Julie | Cook, Nancy | Ford, Ian | Shepherd, James | Cobbe, Stuart M. | Robertson, Michele | Walker, Matthew | Watson, Sarah | Alexander, Myriam | Butterworth, Adam S. | Angelantonio, Emanuele Di | Gao, Pei | Haycock, Philip | Kaptoge, Stephen | Pennells, Lisa | Thompson, Simon G. | Walker, Matthew | Watson, Sarah | White, Ian R. | Wood, Angela M. | Wormser, David | Danesh, John
American Journal of Epidemiology  2013;179(5):621-632.
Individual participant time-to-event data from multiple prospective epidemiologic studies enable detailed investigation into the predictive ability of risk models. Here we address the challenges in appropriately combining such information across studies. Methods are exemplified by analyses of log C-reactive protein and conventional risk factors for coronary heart disease in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration, a collation of individual data from multiple prospective studies with an average follow-up duration of 9.8 years (dates varied). We derive risk prediction models using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis stratified by study and obtain estimates of risk discrimination, Harrell's concordance index, and Royston's discrimination measure within each study; we then combine the estimates across studies using a weighted meta-analysis. Various weighting approaches are compared and lead us to recommend using the number of events in each study. We also discuss the calculation of measures of reclassification for multiple studies. We further show that comparison of differences in predictive ability across subgroups should be based only on within-study information and that combining measures of risk discrimination from case-control studies and prospective studies is problematic. The concordance index and discrimination measure gave qualitatively similar results throughout. While the concordance index was very heterogeneous between studies, principally because of differing age ranges, the increments in the concordance index from adding log C-reactive protein to conventional risk factors were more homogeneous.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwt298
PMCID: PMC3927974  PMID: 24366051
C index; coronary heart disease; D measure; individual participant data; inverse variance; meta-analysis; risk prediction; weighting
11.  Body Mass Index in Young Adulthood, Obesity Trajectory, and Premature Mortality 
American Journal of Epidemiology  2015;182(5):441-450.
Although much research has been conducted on the role adult body mass index (BMI) plays in mortality, there have been fewer studies that evaluated the associations of BMI in young adulthood and adult weight trajectory with mortality, and it remains uncertain whether associations differ by race or sex. We prospectively examined the relationships of BMI in young adulthood (21 years of age) and adult obesity trajectory with later-life mortality rates among 75,881 men and women in the Southern Community Cohort Study. Study participants were enrolled between 2002 and 2009 at ages 40–79 years and were followed through December, 2011. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. There were 7,301 deaths in the 474,970 person-years of follow-up. Participants who reported being overweight or obese as young adults had mortality rates that were 19% (95% confidence interval: 12, 27) and 64% (95% confidence interval: 52, 78) higher, respectively, than those of their normal weight counterparts. The results did not significantly differ by race or sex. Participants who reported being obese in young adulthood only or in both young and middle adulthood experienced mortality rates that were 40%–90% higher than those of participants who were nonobese at either time. These results suggest that obesity in young adulthood is associated with higher mortality risk regardless of race, sex, and obesity status in later life.
doi:10.1093/aje/kwv084
PMCID: PMC4552269  PMID: 25977515
body mass index; mortality; obesity; young adulthood
12.  ANDROGEN RECEPTOR CAG REPEAT POLYMORPHISM AND RISK OF TMPRSS2:ERG POSITIVE PROSTATE CANCER 
Background
The androgen receptor (AR) is an essential gene in prostate cancer pathogenesis and progression. Genetic variation in AR exists, including a polymorphic CAG repeat sequence that is inversely associated with transcriptional activity. Experimental data suggest that heightened AR activity facilitates formation of TMPRSS2:ERG, a gene fusion present in approximately 50 percent of tumors of prostate cancer patients.
Methods
We undertook a nested case-control study to investigate the hypothesis that shorter CAG repeat length would be associated with prostate cancer risk defined by TMPRSS2:ERG status. The study included 291 men with prostate cancer (147 ERG-positive) and 1,221 cancer-free controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression.
Results
Median CAG repeat length (Interquartile range) among controls was 22 (20–24). Men with shorter CAG repeats had an increased risk of ERG-positive (OR=1.07 per 1 repeat decrease, 95% CI 1.00–1.14), but not ERG-negative prostate cancer (OR=0.99 per 1 repeat decrease, 95% CI 0.93–1.05).
Conclusions
These data suggest that shorter CAG repeats are specifically associated with development of TMPRSS2:ERG positive prostate cancer.
Impact
Our results provide supportive evidence that androgen signaling underlies the development of prostate tumors that harbor TMPRSS2:ERG. Moreover, these results suggest that TMPRSS2:ERG may represent a unique molecular subtype of prostate cancer with an etiology distinct from TMPRSS2:ERG negative disease.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0020
PMCID: PMC4184923  PMID: 24925673
Prostate cancer; androgen receptor; TMPRSS2:ERG fusion; genetic polymorphism; case-control
13.  Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of allergy-related genes and risk of adult glioma 
Journal of neuro-oncology  2013;113(2):229-238.
Previous studies have shown an inverse association between allergies and glioma risk; however, results for associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of allergy-related genes and glioma risk have been inconsistent and restricted to a small number of SNPs. The objective of this study was to examine the association between 166 SNPs of 21 allergy-related genes and glioma risk in a nested case-control study of participants from three large US prospective cohort studies. Blood collection took place between 1982 and 1994 among the 562 included Caucasian participants (143 cases and 419 matched controls) prior to case diagnosis. Custom Illumina assay chips were used for genotyping. Logistic regression analyses, controlling for age and study cohort, were used to determine associations between each SNP and glioma risk. Statistically significant associations were found between rs2494262 and rs2427824 of the FCER1A gene, which encodes the alpha chain of the high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor, and glioma risk (nominal trend p-values 0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Significant associations were also found between SNPs in IL10, ADAM33, NOS1 and IL4R and glioma risk; however, these were not corrected for multiple comparisons and need to be interpreted with caution. Our findings with FCER1A SNPs provide further support for the link between allergies and risk of glioma.
doi:10.1007/s11060-013-1122-6
PMCID: PMC3679351  PMID: 23525950
Brain tumors; glioma; allergies; single-nucleotide polymorphisms; cohort studies
14.  Dietary patterns after prostate cancer diagnosis in relation to disease-specific and total mortality 
Men diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer have a long life expectancy and many die of unrelated causes. It is therefore important to know to what extent post-diagnostic diet may impact disease-specific and overall mortality. 926 men participating in the Physicians' Health Study diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer completed diet questionnaires a median of 5.1 years after diagnosis, and were followed thereafter to assess mortality for a median of 9.9 years since questionnaire completion. Two post-diagnostic dietary patterns were identified: a Prudent pattern, characterized by higher intake of vegetables, fruits, fish, legumes, and whole grains; and a Western pattern, characterized by higher intake of processed and red meats, high-fat dairy and refined grains. Cox regression was used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During 8,093 person-years of follow-up, 333 men died, 56 (17%) of prostate cancer. The Western pattern was significantly related to a higher risk of prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Comparing men in the highest versus the lowest quartile of the Western pattern, the HRs were 2.53 (95%CI: 1.00-6.42; Ptrend=0.02) for prostate cancer-specific mortality and 1.67 (95%CI: 1.16-2.42; Ptrend=0.01) for all-cause mortality. The Prudent pattern was associated with a significantly lower all-cause mortality (HRQuartile 4 vs Quartile 1: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.44-0.93; Ptrend=0.02); the relationship with prostate cancer-specific mortality was inverse but not statistically significant. Post-diagnostic Western dietary pattern was associated with higher prostate cancer-specific and all-cause mortality, whereas a Prudent dietary pattern was related to lower all-cause mortality after prostate cancer diagnosis.
doi:10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-14-0442
PMCID: PMC4452958  PMID: 26031631
diet; dietary pattern; prostate cancer; all-cause mortality; Physicians' Health Study
15.  Early life body fatness and risk of colorectal cancer in US women and men – results from two large cohort studies 
Background
The association between body fatness before adulthood and later risk of colorectal cancer remains unclear. We hypothesized that, independent of adult body fatness, early life body fatness would be associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer.
Methods
We assessed body fatness during childhood and adolescence using a validated 9-level somatotype and inquired body weight in young adulthood in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We used Cox proportional hazard regression modeling to estimate relative risks (RRs, 95% CIs) adjusting for adult body mass index (BMI) and other known colorectal cancer risk factors.
Results
We identified 2,100 incident colorectal cancer cases (1,292 in women and 808 in men) during 22 years of follow-up. Among women, the RR(95% CI) for childhood body fatness of level 5 or higher versus level 1 was 1.28(1.04-1.58, p-trend=0.08) and for adolescent body fatness, it was 1.27(1.01-1.60, p-trend = 0.23). The corresponding RRs for men were 1.04(0.82-1.31, p-trend=0.48) and 0.98(0.75-1.27, p-trend=0.20), respectively. Results were generally similar across anatomic subsites within the colorectum. Additionally, the RRs comparing BMI categories ≥ 27.5 to < 19 kg/m2 were 1.44(1.06-1.95, at age 18, p-trend=0.009) for women and 1.18(0.84-1.65, at age 21, p-trend=0.57) for men.
Conclusion
Increased body fatness in early life, independent of adult obesity, might be a risk factor for colorectal cancer in women, but we observed a weaker association in men.
Impact
Our findings support the growing evidence that early life body fatness affects the risk of colorectal cancer many decades later.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0909-T
PMCID: PMC4412364  PMID: 25777804
body fatness; early life; childhood; adolescence; colorectal cancer
16.  Association of Prostate Cancer Risk Variants with Gene Expression in Normal and Tumor Tissue 
Background
Numerous germline genetic variants are associated with prostate cancer risk, but their biological role is not well understood. One possibility is that these variants influence gene expression in prostate tissue. We therefore examined the association of prostate cancer risk variants with the expression of genes nearby and genome-wide.
Methods
We generated mRNA expression data for 20,254 genes with the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST microarray from normal prostate (N=160) and prostate tumor (N=264) tissue from participants of the Physicians’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. With linear models, we tested the association of 39 risk variants with nearby genes and all genes, and the association of each variant with canonical pathways using a global test.
Results
In addition to confirming previously reported associations, we detected several new significant (p<0.05) associations of variants with the expression of nearby genes including C2orf43, ITGA6, MLPH, CHMP2B, BMPR1B, and MTL5. Genome-wide, four genes (MSMB, NUDT11, NEFM, KLHL33) were significantly associated after accounting for multiple comparisons for each SNP (p<2.5x10−6). Many more genes had a false discovery rate <10%, including SRD5A1 and PSCA, and we observed significant associations with pathways in tumor tissue.
Conclusions
The risk variants were associated with several genes, including promising prostate cancer candidates and lipid metabolism pathways, suggesting mechanisms for their impact on disease. These genes should be further explored in biological and epidemiological studies.
Impact
Determining the biological role of these variants can lead to improved understanding of prostate cancer etiology and identify new targets for chemoprevention.
doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0694-T
PMCID: PMC4294966  PMID: 25371445
prostate cancer; genetic risk variant; prostate tissue; gene expression; eQTL
17.  A long-term survival analysis of prediagnostic body mass index, plasma C-peptide concentration, and prostate cancer-specific mortality among men with prostate cancer 
The lancet oncology  2008;9(11):1039-1047.
Summary
Background
Excess body mass index (BMI) has been associated with adverse outcomes in prostate cancer, and hyperinsulinemia is a candidate mediator, but prospective data are sparse. We assessed the influence of prediagnostic BMI and plasma C-peptide (reflecting insulin secretion) on prostate cancer-specific mortality after diagnosis.
Methods
BMI was available at baseline (1982) and in 1990 among 2,546 men who developed prostate cancer (281 prostate cancer deaths). Baseline C-peptide concentration were available in 827 men (117 prostate cancer deaths). We used Cox proportional hazards regression models controlling for age, smoking, time between BMI measurement and prostate cancer diagnosis, and competing causes of death.
Findings
Compared with men of normal weight (BMI<25 kg/m2) at baseline, overweight men (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) and obese men (BMI≥30 kg/m2) had significantly higher risk of prostate cancer mortality; the proportional hazard ratio (HR)s (95% confidence interval, CI) were 1.47 (1.16–1.88) for overweight and 2.66 (1.62–4.39; Ptrend<0.0001) for obesity. The trend remained significant after controlling for clinical stage and Gleason grade and was stronger for prostate cancer diagnosed during the PSA screening era (1991–2007) or using BMI obtained in 1990. Men with C-peptide concentrations in the highest quartile (high), versus the lowest quartile (low), also had higher risk (HR=2.38; 1.31–4.30). Compared with men with BMI<25 kg/m2 and low C-peptide concentrations, those with BMI≥25 kg/m2 and high C-peptide concentration had a four times higher risk (HR=4.12; 1.97–8.61; Pinteraction=0.001) independent of clinical predictors.
Interpretation
Excess body weight and high plasma concentration of C-peptide each predispose men with a subsequent diagnosis of prostate cancer to increased likelihood of dying of this disease; those with both factors have the worst outcome.
doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(08)70235-3
PMCID: PMC2651222  PMID: 18835745
19.  Genetic variation in the Toll-Like Receptor 4 and prostate cancer incidence and mortality 
The Prostate  2011;72(2):209-216.
Background
Common genetic variants in the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), which is involved in inflammation and immune response pathways, may be important for prostate cancer.
Methods
In a large nested case-control study of prostate cancer in the Physicians’ Health Study (1982–2004), 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected and genotyped to capture common variation within the TLR4 gene as well as 5 kilobases up and downstream. Unconditional logistic regression was used to assess associations of these SNPs with total prostate cancer incidence, and with prostate cancers defined as advanced stage/lethal (T3/T4, M1/N1(T1-T4), lethal) or high Gleason grade (7 (4+3) or greater). Cox-proportional hazards regression was used to assess progression to metastases and death among prostate cancer cases.
Results
The study included 1267 controls and 1286 incident prostate cancer cases, including 248 advanced stage/lethal and 306 high grade cases. During a median follow-up of 10.6 years, 183 men died of prostate cancer or developed distant metastases. No statistically significant associations between the TLR4 SNPs were found for total prostate cancer incidence, including SNPs for which an association was reported in other published studies. Additionally, there were no significant associations with TLR4 SNPS and the incidence of advanced stage/lethal, or high grade cancers; nor was there evidence among prostate cancer cases for associations of TLR4 SNPs with progression to prostate cancer specific mortality or bony metastases.
Conclusions
Results from this prospective nested case-control study suggest that genetic variation across TLR4 alone is not strongly associated with prostate cancer risk or mortality.
doi:10.1002/pros.21423
PMCID: PMC3175021  PMID: 21563195
TLR4; prostate cancer; inflammation; molecular epidemiology
20.  Childhood socioeconomic status and risk of cardiovascular disease in middle aged US women: a prospective study. 
OBJECTIVE--To examine prospectively the relationship of childhood socioeconomic status and risk of cardiovascular disease in middle aged women. DESIGN--A prospective cohort of women with 14 years follow up data (1976-90). SUBJECTS--A total of 117,006 registered female nurses aged 30 to 55 years in 1976 and free of diagnosed coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Incident fatal coronary heart disease, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and stroke (fatal and non-fatal). RESULTS--Low socioeconomic status in childhood was associated with a modestly increased risk of incident non-fatal myocardial infarction and total cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Compared with middle aged women from white collar childhood backgrounds, the age adjusted risk of total cardiovascular disease for women from blue collar backgrounds was 1.13 (95% CI 1.02, 1.24) and that of non-fatal myocardial infarction was 1.23 (95% CI 1.06, 1.42). No significant increase in risk was observed for stroke or fatal coronary heart disease. Adjustment for differences in family and personal past medical history, medication use, exercise, alcohol intake, diet, birth weight, being breastfed in infancy, and adult socioeconomic circumstance somewhat attenuated the increased risks observed for women from blue collar childhood socioeconomic backgrounds. In multivariate analysis, women whose fathers had been manual labourers had the highest relative risk of total coronary heart disease (RR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.09, 2.16) and non-fatal myocardial infarction (RR = 1.67; 95% CI 1.11, 2.53) when compared with women whose fathers had been employed in the professions. CONCLUSION--In this group lower childhood socioeconomic status was associated with a small but significant increase in the risk of total coronary heart disease as well as non-fatal myocardial infarction. For women from the most socioeconomically disadvantaged childhood backgrounds, the association is not explained by differences in a large number of cardiovascular risk factors, by differences in adult socioeconomic status, or by differences in indices of nutrition during gestation or infancy.
PMCID: PMC1060067  PMID: 7706992
21.  PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM rare variants and cancer risk: data from COGS 
Southey, Melissa C | Goldgar, David E | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Couch, Fergus | Tischkowitz, Marc | Foulkes, William D | Dennis, Joe | Michailidou, Kyriaki | van Rensburg, Elizabeth J | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Nevanlinna, Heli | Hopper, John L | Dörk, Thilo | Claes, Kathleen BM | Reis-Filho, Jorge | Teo, Zhi Ling | Radice, Paolo | Catucci, Irene | Peterlongo, Paolo | Tsimiklis, Helen | Odefrey, Fabrice A | Dowty, James G | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Broeks, Annegien | Hogervorst, Frans B | Verhoef, Senno | Carpenter, Jane | Clarke, Christine | Scott, Rodney J | Fasching, Peter A | Haeberle, Lothar | Ekici, Arif B | Beckmann, Matthias W | Peto, Julian | dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | Bolla, Manjeet K | Sawyer, Elinor J | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael J | Miller, Nicola | Marme, Federik | Burwinkel, Barbara | Yang, Rongxi | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Thérèse | Menegaux, Florence | Sanchez, Marie | Bojesen, Stig | Nielsen, Sune F | Flyger, Henrik | Benitez, Javier | Zamora, M Pilar | Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias | Menéndez, Primitiva | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Neuhausen, Susan | Ziogas, Argyrios | Clarke, Christina A | Brenner, Hermann | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brüning, Thomas | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Muranen, Taru A | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Bogdanova, Natalia V | Antonenkova, Natalia N | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M | Spurdle, Amanda B | Investigators, kConFab | Wauters, Els | Smeets, Dominiek | Beuselinck, Benoit | Floris, Giuseppe | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Olson, Janet E | Vachon, Celine | Pankratz, Vernon S | McLean, Catriona | Haiman, Christopher A | Henderson, Brian E | Schumacher, Fredrick | Le Marchand, Loic | Kristensen, Vessela | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Zheng, Wei | Hunter, David J | Lindstrom, Sara | Hankinson, Susan E | Kraft, Peter | Andrulis, Irene | Knight, Julia A | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Kauppila, Saila | Devilee, Peter | Tollenaar, Robert A E M | Seynaeve, Caroline | Hollestelle, Antoinette | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Figueroa, Jonine | Chanock, Stephen J | Lissowska, Jolanta | Czene, Kamila | Darabi, Hatef | Eriksson, Mikael | Eccles, Diana M | Rafiq, Sajjad | Tapper, William J | Gerty, Sue M | Hooning, Maartje J | Martens, John W M | Collée, J Margriet | Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine | Hall, Per | Li, Jingmei | Brand, Judith S | Humphreys, Keith | Cox, Angela | Reed, Malcolm W R | Luccarini, Craig | Baynes, Caroline | Dunning, Alison M | Hamann, Ute | Torres, Diana | Ulmer, Hans Ulrich | Rüdiger, Thomas | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Slager, Susan | Toland, Amanda E | Ambrosone, Christine B | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Swerdlow, Anthony | Ashworth, Alan | Orr, Nick | Jones, Michael | González-Neira, Anna | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M Rosario | Álvarez, Nuria | Herrero, Daniel | Tessier, Daniel C | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, Francois | Simard, Jacques | Dumont, Martine | Soucy, Penny | Eeles, Rosalind | Muir, Kenneth | Wiklund, Fredrik | Gronberg, Henrik | Schleutker, Johanna | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Weischer, Maren | Travis, Ruth C | Neal, David | Donovan, Jenny L | Hamdy, Freddie C | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Stanford, Janet L | Blot, William J | Thibodeau, Stephen | Schaid, Daniel J | Kelley, Joseph L | Maier, Christiane | Kibel, Adam S | Cybulski, Cezary | Cannon-Albright, Lisa | Butterbach, Katja | Park, Jong | Kaneva, Radka | Batra, Jyotsna | Teixeira, Manuel R | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Olama, Ali Amin Al | Benlloch, Sara | Renner, Stefan P | Hartmann, Arndt | Hein, Alexander | Ruebner, Matthias | Lambrechts, Diether | Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els | Vergote, Ignace | Lambretchs, Sandrina | Doherty, Jennifer A | Rossing, Mary Anne | Nickels, Stefan | Eilber, Ursula | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Odunsi, Kunle | Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E | Friel, Grace | Lurie, Galina | Killeen, Jeffrey L | Wilkens, Lynne R | Goodman, Marc T | Runnebaum, Ingo | Hillemanns, Peter A | Pelttari, Liisa M | Butzow, Ralf | Modugno, Francesmary | Edwards, Robert P | Ness, Roberta B | Moysich, Kirsten B | du Bois, Andreas | Heitz, Florian | Harter, Philipp | Kommoss, Stefan | Karlan, Beth Y | Walsh, Christine | Lester, Jenny | Jensen, Allan | Kjaer, Susanne Krüger | Høgdall, Estrid | Peissel, Bernard | Bonanni, Bernardo | Bernard, Loris | Goode, Ellen L | Fridley, Brooke L | Vierkant, Robert A | Cunningham, Julie M | Larson, Melissa C | Fogarty, Zachary C | Kalli, Kimberly R | Liang, Dong | Lu, Karen H | Hildebrandt, Michelle A T | Wu, Xifeng | Levine, Douglas A | Dao, Fanny | Bisogna, Maria | Berchuck, Andrew | Iversen, Edwin S | Marks, Jeffrey R | Akushevich, Lucy | Cramer, Daniel W | Schildkraut, Joellen | Terry, Kathryn L | Poole, Elizabeth M | Stampfer, Meir | Tworoger, Shelley S | Bandera, Elisa V | Orlow, Irene | Olson, Sara H | Bjorge, Line | Salvesen, Helga B | van Altena, Anne M | Aben, Katja K H | Kiemeney, Lambertus A | Massuger, Leon F A G | Pejovic, Tanja | Bean, Yukie | Brooks-Wilson, Angela | Kelemen, Linda E | Cook, Linda S | Le, Nhu D | Górski, Bohdan | Gronwald, Jacek | Menkiszak, Janusz | Høgdall, Claus K | Lundvall, Lene | Nedergaard, Lotte | Engelholm, Svend Aage | Dicks, Ed | Tyrer, Jonathan | Campbell, Ian | McNeish, Iain | Paul, James | Siddiqui, Nadeem | Glasspool, Rosalind | Whittemore, Alice S | Rothstein, Joseph H | McGuire, Valerie | Sieh, Weiva | Cai, Hui | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Teten, Rachel T | Sutphen, Rebecca | McLaughlin, John R | Narod, Steven A | Phelan, Catherine M | Monteiro, Alvaro N | Fenstermacher, David | Lin, Hui-Yi | Permuth, Jennifer B | Sellers, Thomas A | Chen, Y Ann | Tsai, Ya-Yu | Chen, Zhihua | Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra | Gayther, Simon A | Ramus, Susan J | Menon, Usha | Wu, Anna H | Pearce, Celeste L | Van Den Berg, David | Pike, Malcolm C | Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka | Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna | Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna | Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta | Pharoah, Paul DP | Song, Honglin | Winship, Ingrid | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Giles, Graham G | Tavtigian, Sean V | Easton, Doug F | Milne, Roger L
Journal of Medical Genetics  2016;53(12):800-811.
Background
The rarity of mutations in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM make it difficult to estimate precisely associated cancer risks. Population-based family studies have provided evidence that at least some of these mutations are associated with breast cancer risk as high as those associated with rare BRCA2 mutations. We aimed to estimate the relative risks associated with specific rare variants in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM via a multicentre case-control study.
Methods
We genotyped 10 rare mutations using the custom iCOGS array: PALB2 c.1592delT, c.2816T>G and c.3113G>A, CHEK2 c.349A>G, c.538C>T, c.715G>A, c.1036C>T, c.1312G>T, and c.1343T>G and ATM c.7271T>G. We assessed associations with breast cancer risk (42 671 cases and 42 164 controls), as well as prostate (22 301 cases and 22 320 controls) and ovarian (14 542 cases and 23 491 controls) cancer risk, for each variant.
Results
For European women, strong evidence of association with breast cancer risk was observed for PALB2 c.1592delT OR 3.44 (95% CI 1.39 to 8.52, p=7.1×10−5), PALB2 c.3113G>A OR 4.21 (95% CI 1.84 to 9.60, p=6.9×10−8) and ATM c.7271T>G OR 11.0 (95% CI 1.42 to 85.7, p=0.0012). We also found evidence of association with breast cancer risk for three variants in CHEK2, c.349A>G OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.29 to 3.95), c.1036C>T OR 5.06 (95% CI 1.09 to 23.5) and c.538C>T OR 1.33 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.67) (p≤0.017). Evidence for prostate cancer risk was observed for CHEK2 c.1343T>G OR 3.03 (95% CI 1.53 to 6.03, p=0.0006) for African men and CHEK2 c.1312G>T OR 2.21 (95% CI 1.06 to 4.63, p=0.030) for European men. No evidence of association with ovarian cancer was found for any of these variants.
Conclusions
This report adds to accumulating evidence that at least some variants in these genes are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer that is clinically important.
doi:10.1136/jmedgenet-2016-103839
PMCID: PMC5200636  PMID: 27595995
Cancer: breast; Cancer: prostate; Genetics; Cancer: ovary; cancer predisposition
22.  PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM rare variants and cancer risk: data from COGS 
Southey, Melissa C | Goldgar, David E | Winqvist, Robert | Pylkäs, Katri | Couch, Fergus | Tischkowitz, Marc | Foulkes, William D | Dennis, Joe | Michailidou, Kyriaki | van Rensburg, Elizabeth J | Heikkinen, Tuomas | Nevanlinna, Heli | Hopper, John L | Dörk, Thilo | Claes, Kathleen BM | Reis-Filho, Jorge | Teo, Zhi Ling | Radice, Paolo | Catucci, Irene | Peterlongo, Paolo | Tsimiklis, Helen | Odefrey, Fabrice A | Dowty, James G | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Broeks, Annegien | Hogervorst, Frans B | Verhoef, Senno | Carpenter, Jane | Clarke, Christine | Scott, Rodney J | Fasching, Peter A | Haeberle, Lothar | Ekici, Arif B | Beckmann, Matthias W | Peto, Julian | dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel | Fletcher, Olivia | Johnson, Nichola | Bolla, Manjeet K | Sawyer, Elinor J | Tomlinson, Ian | Kerin, Michael J | Miller, Nicola | Marme, Federik | Burwinkel, Barbara | Yang, Rongxi | Guénel, Pascal | Truong, Thérèse | Menegaux, Florence | Sanchez, Marie | Bojesen, Stig | Nielsen, Sune F | Flyger, Henrik | Benitez, Javier | Zamora, M Pilar | Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio | Menéndez, Primitiva | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Neuhausen, Susan | Ziogas, Argyrios | Clarke, Christina A | Brenner, Hermann | Arndt, Volker | Stegmaier, Christa | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brüning, Thomas | Ko, Yon-Dschun | Muranen, Taru A | Aittomäki, Kristiina | Blomqvist, Carl | Bogdanova, Natalia V | Antonenkova, Natalia N | Lindblom, Annika | Margolin, Sara | Mannermaa, Arto | Kataja, Vesa | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Hartikainen, Jaana M | Spurdle, Amanda B | Wauters, Els | Smeets, Dominiek | Beuselinck, Benoit | Floris, Giuseppe | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Rudolph, Anja | Seibold, Petra | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Olson, Janet E | Vachon, Celine | Pankratz, Vernon S | McLean, Catriona | Haiman, Christopher A | Henderson, Brian E | Schumacher, Fredrick | Le Marchand, Loic | Kristensen, Vessela | Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker | Zheng, Wei | Hunter, David J | Lindstrom, Sara | Hankinson, Susan E | Kraft, Peter | Andrulis, Irene | Knight, Julia A | Glendon, Gord | Mulligan, Anna Marie | Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja | Grip, Mervi | Kauppila, Saila | Devilee, Peter | Tollenaar, Robert A E M | Seynaeve, Caroline | Hollestelle, Antoinette | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | Figueroa, Jonine | Chanock, Stephen J | Lissowska, Jolanta | Czene, Kamila | Darabi, Hatef | Eriksson, Mikael | Eccles, Diana M | Rafiq, Sajjad | Tapper, William J | Gerty, Sue M | Hooning, Maartje J | Martens, John W M | Collée, J Margriet | Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine | Hall, Per | Li, Jingmei | Brand, Judith S | Humphreys, Keith | Cox, Angela | Reed, Malcolm W R | Luccarini, Craig | Baynes, Caroline | Dunning, Alison M | Hamann, Ute | Torres, Diana | Ulmer, Hans Ulrich | Rüdiger, Thomas | Jakubowska, Anna | Lubinski, Jan | Jaworska, Katarzyna | Durda, Katarzyna | Slager, Susan | Toland, Amanda E | Ambrosone, Christine B | Yannoukakos, Drakoulis | Swerdlow, Anthony | Ashworth, Alan | Orr, Nick | Jones, Michael | González-Neira, Anna | Pita, Guillermo | Alonso, M Rosario | Álvarez, Nuria | Herrero, Daniel | Tessier, Daniel C | Vincent, Daniel | Bacot, Francois | Simard, Jacques | Dumont, Martine | Soucy, Penny | Eeles, Rosalind | Muir, Kenneth | Wiklund, Fredrik | Gronberg, Henrik | Schleutker, Johanna | Nordestgaard, Børge G | Weischer, Maren | Travis, Ruth C | Neal, David | Donovan, Jenny L | Hamdy, Freddie C | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Stanford, Janet L | Blot, William J | Thibodeau, Stephen | Schaid, Daniel J | Kelley, Joseph L | Maier, Christiane | Kibel, Adam S | Cybulski, Cezary | Cannon-Albright, Lisa | Butterbach, Katja | Park, Jong | Kaneva, Radka | Batra, Jyotsna | Teixeira, Manuel R | Kote-Jarai, Zsofia | Al Olama, Ali Amin | Benlloch, Sara | Renner, Stefan P | Hartmann, Arndt | Hein, Alexander | Ruebner, Matthias | Lambrechts, Diether | Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els | Vergote, Ignace | Lambretchs, Sandrina | Doherty, Jennifer A | Rossing, Mary Anne | Nickels, Stefan | Eilber, Ursula | Wang-Gohrke, Shan | Odunsi, Kunle | Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E | Friel, Grace | Lurie, Galina | Killeen, Jeffrey L | Wilkens, Lynne R | Goodman, Marc T | Runnebaum, Ingo | Hillemanns, Peter A | Pelttari, Liisa M | Butzow, Ralf | Modugno, Francesmary | Edwards, Robert P | Ness, Roberta B | Moysich, Kirsten B | du Bois, Andreas | Heitz, Florian | Harter, Philipp | Kommoss, Stefan | Karlan, Beth Y | Walsh, Christine | Lester, Jenny | Jensen, Allan | Kjaer, Susanne Krüger | Høgdall, Estrid | Peissel, Bernard | Bonanni, Bernardo | Bernard, Loris | Goode, Ellen L | Fridley, Brooke L | Vierkant, Robert A | Cunningham, Julie M | Larson, Melissa C | Fogarty, Zachary C | Kalli, Kimberly R | Liang, Dong | Lu, Karen H | Hildebrandt, Michelle A T | Wu, Xifeng | Levine, Douglas A | Dao, Fanny | Bisogna, Maria | Berchuck, Andrew | Iversen, Edwin S | Marks, Jeffrey R | Akushevich, Lucy | Cramer, Daniel W | Schildkraut, Joellen | Terry, Kathryn L | Poole, Elizabeth M | Stampfer, Meir | Tworoger, Shelley S | Bandera, Elisa V | Orlow, Irene | Olson, Sara H | Bjorge, Line | Salvesen, Helga B | van Altena, Anne M | Aben, Katja K H | Kiemeney, Lambertus A | Massuger, Leon F A G | Pejovic, Tanja | Bean, Yukie | Brooks-Wilson, Angela | Kelemen, Linda E | Cook, Linda S | Le, Nhu D | Górski, Bohdan | Gronwald, Jacek | Menkiszak, Janusz | Høgdall, Claus K | Lundvall, Lene | Nedergaard, Lotte | Engelholm, Svend Aage | Dicks, Ed | Tyrer, Jonathan | Campbell, Ian | McNeish, Iain | Paul, James | Siddiqui, Nadeem | Glasspool, Rosalind | Whittemore, Alice S | Rothstein, Joseph H | McGuire, Valerie | Sieh, Weiva | Cai, Hui | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Teten, Rachel T | Sutphen, Rebecca | McLaughlin, John R | Narod, Steven A | Phelan, Catherine M | Monteiro, Alvaro N | Fenstermacher, David | Lin, Hui-Yi | Permuth, Jennifer B | Sellers, Thomas A | Chen, Y Ann | Tsai, Ya-Yu | Chen, Zhihua | Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra | Gayther, Simon A | Ramus, Susan J | Menon, Usha | Wu, Anna H | Pearce, Celeste L | Van Den Berg, David | Pike, Malcolm C | Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka | Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna | Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna | Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta | Pharoah, Paul DP | Song, Honglin | Winship, Ingrid | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Giles, Graham G | Tavtigian, Sean V | Easton, Doug F | Milne, Roger L
Journal of medical genetics  2016;53(12):800-811.
Background
The rarity of mutations in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM make it difficult to estimate precisely associated cancer risks. Population-based family studies have provided evidence that at least some of these mutations are associated with breast cancer risk as high as those associated with rare BRCA2 mutations. We aimed to estimate the relative risks associated with specific rare variants in PALB2, CHEK2 and ATM via a multicentre case-control study.
Methods
We genotyped 10 rare mutations using the custom iCOGS array: PALB2 c.1592delT, c.2816T>G and c.3113G>A, CHEK2 c.349A>G, c.538C>T, c.715G>A, c.1036C>T, c.1312G>T, and c.1343T>G and ATM c.7271T>G. We assessed associations with breast cancer risk (42 671 cases and 42 164 controls), as well as prostate (22 301 cases and 22 320 controls) and ovarian (14 542 cases and 23 491 controls) cancer risk, for each variant.
Results
For European women, strong evidence of association with breast cancer risk was observed for PALB2 c.1592delT OR 3.44 (95% CI 1.39 to 8.52, p=7.1×10−5), PALB2 c.3113G>A OR 4.21 (95% CI 1.84 to 9.60, p=6.9×10−8) and ATM c.7271T>G OR 11.0 (95% CI 1.42 to 85.7, p=0.0012). We also found evidence of association with breast cancer risk for three variants in CHEK2, c.349A>G OR 2.26 (95% CI 1.29 to 3.95), c.1036C>T OR 5.06 (95% CI 1.09 to 23.5) and c.538C>T OR 1.33 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.67) (p≤0.017). Evidence for prostate cancer risk was observed for CHEK2 c.1343T>G OR 3.03 (95% CI 1.53 to 6.03, p=0.0006) for African men and CHEK2 c.1312G>T OR 2.21 (95% CI 1.06 to 4.63, p=0.030) for European men. No evidence of association with ovarian cancer was found for any of these variants.
Conclusions
This report adds to accumulating evidence that at least some variants in these genes are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer that is clinically important.
doi:10.1136/jmedgenet-2016-103839
PMCID: PMC5200636  PMID: 27595995
23.  Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche 
Perry, John RB | Day, Felix | Elks, Cathy E | Sulem, Patrick | Thompson, Deborah J | Ferreira, Teresa | He, Chunyan | Chasman, Daniel I | Esko, Tõnu | Thorleifsson, Gudmar | Albrecht, Eva | Ang, Wei Q | Corre, Tanguy | Cousminer, Diana L | Feenstra, Bjarke | Franceschini, Nora | Ganna, Andrea | Johnson, Andrew D | Kjellqvist, Sanela | Lunetta, Kathryn L | McMahon, George | Nolte, Ilja M | Paternoster, Lavinia | Porcu, Eleonora | Smith, Albert V | Stolk, Lisette | Teumer, Alexander | Tšernikova, Natalia | Tikkanen, Emmi | Ulivi, Sheila | Wagner, Erin K | Amin, Najaf | Bierut, Laura J | Byrne, Enda M | Hottenga, Jouke-Jan | Koller, Daniel L | Mangino, Massimo | Pers, Tune H | Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M | Zhao, Jing Hua | Andrulis, Irene L | Anton-Culver, Hoda | Atsma, Femke | Bandinelli, Stefania | Beckmann, Matthias W | Benitez, Javier | Blomqvist, Carl | Bojesen, Stig E | Bolla, Manjeet K | Bonanni, Bernardo | Brauch, Hiltrud | Brenner, Hermann | Buring, Julie E | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chanock, Stephen | Chen, Jinhui | Chenevix-Trench, Georgia | Collée, J. Margriet | Couch, Fergus J | Couper, David | Coveillo, Andrea D | Cox, Angela | Czene, Kamila | D’adamo, Adamo Pio | Smith, George Davey | De Vivo, Immaculata | Demerath, Ellen W | Dennis, Joe | Devilee, Peter | Dieffenbach, Aida K | Dunning, Alison M | Eiriksdottir, Gudny | Eriksson, Johan G | Fasching, Peter A | Ferrucci, Luigi | Flesch-Janys, Dieter | Flyger, Henrik | Foroud, Tatiana | Franke, Lude | Garcia, Melissa E | García-Closas, Montserrat | Geller, Frank | de Geus, Eco EJ | Giles, Graham G | Gudbjartsson, Daniel F | Gudnason, Vilmundur | Guénel, Pascal | Guo, Suiqun | Hall, Per | Hamann, Ute | Haring, Robin | Hartman, Catharina A | Heath, Andrew C | Hofman, Albert | Hooning, Maartje J | Hopper, John L | Hu, Frank B | Hunter, David J | Karasik, David | Kiel, Douglas P | Knight, Julia A | Kosma, Veli-Matti | Kutalik, Zoltan | Lai, Sandra | Lambrechts, Diether | Lindblom, Annika | Mägi, Reedik | Magnusson, Patrik K | Mannermaa, Arto | Martin, Nicholas G | Masson, Gisli | McArdle, Patrick F | McArdle, Wendy L | Melbye, Mads | Michailidou, Kyriaki | Mihailov, Evelin | Milani, Lili | Milne, Roger L | Nevanlinna, Heli | Neven, Patrick | Nohr, Ellen A | Oldehinkel, Albertine J | Oostra, Ben A | Palotie, Aarno | Peacock, Munro | Pedersen, Nancy L | Peterlongo, Paolo | Peto, Julian | Pharoah, Paul DP | Postma, Dirkje S | Pouta, Anneli | Pylkäs, Katri | Radice, Paolo | Ring, Susan | Rivadeneira, Fernando | Robino, Antonietta | Rose, Lynda M | Rudolph, Anja | Salomaa, Veikko | Sanna, Serena | Schlessinger, David | Schmidt, Marjanka K | Southey, Mellissa C | Sovio, Ulla | Stampfer, Meir J | Stöckl, Doris | Storniolo, Anna M | Timpson, Nicholas J | Tyrer, Jonathan | Visser, Jenny A | Vollenweider, Peter | Völzke, Henry | Waeber, Gerard | Waldenberger, Melanie | Wallaschofski, Henri | Wang, Qin | Willemsen, Gonneke | Winqvist, Robert | Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR | Wright, Margaret J | Boomsma, Dorret I | Econs, Michael J | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Loos, Ruth JF | McCarthy, Mark I | Montgomery, Grant W | Rice, John P | Streeten, Elizabeth A | Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur | van Duijn, Cornelia M | Alizadeh, Behrooz Z | Bergmann, Sven | Boerwinkle, Eric | Boyd, Heather A | Crisponi, Laura | Gasparini, Paolo | Gieger, Christian | Harris, Tamara B | Ingelsson, Erik | Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta | Kraft, Peter | Lawlor, Debbie | Metspalu, Andres | Pennell, Craig E | Ridker, Paul M | Snieder, Harold | Sørensen, Thorkild IA | Spector, Tim D | Strachan, David P | Uitterlinden, André G | Wareham, Nicholas J | Widen, Elisabeth | Zygmunt, Marek | Murray, Anna | Easton, Douglas F | Stefansson, Kari | Murabito, Joanne M | Ong, Ken K
Nature  2014;514(7520):92-97.
Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10−8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.
doi:10.1038/nature13545
PMCID: PMC4185210  PMID: 25231870
24.  Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for 13 Cancer Types 
Sampson, Joshua N. | Wheeler, William A. | Yeager, Meredith | Panagiotou, Orestis | Wang, Zhaoming | Berndt, Sonja I. | Lan, Qing | Abnet, Christian C. | Amundadottir, Laufey T. | Figueroa, Jonine D. | Landi, Maria Teresa | Mirabello, Lisa | Savage, Sharon A. | Taylor, Philip R. | Vivo, Immaculata De | McGlynn, Katherine A. | Purdue, Mark P. | Rajaraman, Preetha | Adami, Hans-Olov | Ahlbom, Anders | Albanes, Demetrius | Amary, Maria Fernanda | An, She-Juan | Andersson, Ulrika | Andriole, Gerald | Andrulis, Irene L. | Angelucci, Emanuele | Ansell, Stephen M. | Arici, Cecilia | Armstrong, Bruce K. | Arslan, Alan A. | Austin, Melissa A. | Baris, Dalsu | Barkauskas, Donald A. | Bassig, Bryan A. | Becker, Nikolaus | Benavente, Yolanda | Benhamou, Simone | Berg, Christine | Van Den Berg, David | Bernstein, Leslie | Bertrand, Kimberly A. | Birmann, Brenda M. | Black, Amanda | Boeing, Heiner | Boffetta, Paolo | Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine | Bracci, Paige M. | Brinton, Louise | Brooks-Wilson, Angela R. | Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas | Burdett, Laurie | Buring, Julie | Butler, Mary Ann | Cai, Qiuyin | Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine | Canzian, Federico | Carrato, Alfredo | Carreon, Tania | Carta, Angela | Chan, John K. C. | Chang, Ellen T. | Chang, Gee-Chen | Chang, I-Shou | Chang, Jiang | Chang-Claude, Jenny | Chen, Chien-Jen | Chen, Chih-Yi | Chen, Chu | Chen, Chung-Hsing | Chen, Constance | Chen, Hongyan | Chen, Kexin | Chen, Kuan-Yu | Chen, Kun-Chieh | Chen, Ying | Chen, Ying-Hsiang | Chen, Yi-Song | Chen, Yuh-Min | Chien, Li-Hsin | Chirlaque, María-Dolores | Choi, Jin Eun | Choi, Yi Young | Chow, Wong-Ho | Chung, Charles C. | Clavel, Jacqueline | Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise | Cocco, Pierluigi | Colt, Joanne S. | Comperat, Eva | Conde, Lucia | Connors, Joseph M. | Conti, David | Cortessis, Victoria K. | Cotterchio, Michelle | Cozen, Wendy | Crouch, Simon | Crous-Bou, Marta | Cussenot, Olivier | Davis, Faith G. | Ding, Ti | Diver, W. Ryan | Dorronsoro, Miren | Dossus, Laure | Duell, Eric J. | Ennas, Maria Grazia | Erickson, Ralph L. | Feychting, Maria | Flanagan, Adrienne M. | Foretova, Lenka | Fraumeni, Joseph F. | Freedman, Neal D. | Beane Freeman, Laura E. | Fuchs, Charles | Gago-Dominguez, Manuela | Gallinger, Steven | Gao, Yu-Tang | Gapstur, Susan M. | Garcia-Closas, Montserrat | García-Closas, Reina | Gascoyne, Randy D. | Gastier-Foster, Julie | Gaudet, Mia M. | Gaziano, J. Michael | Giffen, Carol | Giles, Graham G. | Giovannucci, Edward | Glimelius, Bengt | Goggins, Michael | Gokgoz, Nalan | Goldstein, Alisa M. | Gorlick, Richard | Gross, Myron | Grubb, Robert | Gu, Jian | Guan, Peng | Gunter, Marc | Guo, Huan | Habermann, Thomas M. | Haiman, Christopher A. | Halai, Dina | Hallmans, Goran | Hassan, Manal | Hattinger, Claudia | He, Qincheng | He, Xingzhou | Helzlsouer, Kathy | Henderson, Brian | Henriksson, Roger | Hjalgrim, Henrik | Hoffman-Bolton, Judith | Hohensee, Chancellor | Holford, Theodore R. | Holly, Elizabeth A. | Hong, Yun-Chul | Hoover, Robert N. | Horn-Ross, Pamela L. | Hosain, G. M. Monawar | Hosgood, H. Dean | Hsiao, Chin-Fu | Hu, Nan | Hu, Wei | Hu, Zhibin | Huang, Ming-Shyan | Huerta, Jose-Maria | Hung, Jen-Yu | Hutchinson, Amy | Inskip, Peter D. | Jackson, Rebecca D. | Jacobs, Eric J. | Jenab, Mazda | Jeon, Hyo-Sung | Ji, Bu-Tian | Jin, Guangfu | Jin, Li | Johansen, Christoffer | Johnson, Alison | Jung, Yoo Jin | Kaaks, Rudolph | Kamineni, Aruna | Kane, Eleanor | Kang, Chang Hyun | Karagas, Margaret R. | Kelly, Rachel S. | Khaw, Kay-Tee | Kim, Christopher | Kim, Hee Nam | Kim, Jin Hee | Kim, Jun Suk | Kim, Yeul Hong | Kim, Young Tae | Kim, Young-Chul | Kitahara, Cari M. | Klein, Alison P. | Klein, Robert J. | Kogevinas, Manolis | Kohno, Takashi | Kolonel, Laurence N. | Kooperberg, Charles | Kricker, Anne | Krogh, Vittorio | Kunitoh, Hideo | Kurtz, Robert C. | Kweon, Sun-Seog | LaCroix, Andrea | Lawrence, Charles | Lecanda, Fernando | Lee, Victor Ho Fun | Li, Donghui | Li, Haixin | Li, Jihua | Li, Yao-Jen | Li, Yuqing | Liao, Linda M. | Liebow, Mark | Lightfoot, Tracy | Lim, Wei-Yen | Lin, Chien-Chung | Lin, Dongxin | Lindstrom, Sara | Linet, Martha S. | Link, Brian K. | Liu, Chenwei | Liu, Jianjun | Liu, Li | Ljungberg, Börje | Lloreta, Josep | Lollo, Simonetta Di | Lu, Daru | Lund, Eiluv | Malats, Nuria | Mannisto, Satu | Marchand, Loic Le | Marina, Neyssa | Masala, Giovanna | Mastrangelo, Giuseppe | Matsuo, Keitaro | Maynadie, Marc | McKay, James | McKean-Cowdin, Roberta | Melbye, Mads | Melin, Beatrice S. | Michaud, Dominique S. | Mitsudomi, Tetsuya | Monnereau, Alain | Montalvan, Rebecca | Moore, Lee E. | Mortensen, Lotte Maxild | Nieters, Alexandra | North, Kari E. | Novak, Anne J. | Oberg, Ann L. | Offit, Kenneth | Oh, In-Jae | Olson, Sara H. | Palli, Domenico | Pao, William | Park, In Kyu | Park, Jae Yong | Park, Kyong Hwa | Patiño-Garcia, Ana | Pavanello, Sofia | Peeters, Petra H. M. | Perng, Reury-Perng | Peters, Ulrike | Petersen, Gloria M. | Picci, Piero | Pike, Malcolm C. | Porru, Stefano | Prescott, Jennifer | Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila | Qian, Biyun | Qiao, You-Lin | Rais, Marco | Riboli, Elio | Riby, Jacques | Risch, Harvey A. | Rizzato, Cosmeri | Rodabough, Rebecca | Roman, Eve | Roupret, Morgan | Ruder, Avima M. | de Sanjose, Silvia | Scelo, Ghislaine | Schned, Alan | Schumacher, Fredrick | Schwartz, Kendra | Schwenn, Molly | Scotlandi, Katia | Seow, Adeline | Serra, Consol | Serra, Massimo | Sesso, Howard D. | Setiawan, Veronica Wendy | Severi, Gianluca | Severson, Richard K. | Shanafelt, Tait D. | Shen, Hongbing | Shen, Wei | Shin, Min-Ho | Shiraishi, Kouya | Shu, Xiao-Ou | Siddiq, Afshan | Sierrasesúmaga, Luis | Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon | Skibola, Christine F. | Smith, Alex | Smith, Martyn T. | Southey, Melissa C. | Spinelli, John J. | Staines, Anthony | Stampfer, Meir | Stern, Marianna C. | Stevens, Victoria L. | Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S. | Su, Jian | Su, Wu-Chou | Sund, Malin | Sung, Jae Sook | Sung, Sook Whan | Tan, Wen | Tang, Wei | Tardón, Adonina | Thomas, David | Thompson, Carrie A. | Tinker, Lesley F. | Tirabosco, Roberto | Tjønneland, Anne | Travis, Ruth C. | Trichopoulos, Dimitrios | Tsai, Fang-Yu | Tsai, Ying-Huang | Tucker, Margaret | Turner, Jenny | Vajdic, Claire M. | Vermeulen, Roel C. H. | Villano, Danylo J. | Vineis, Paolo | Virtamo, Jarmo | Visvanathan, Kala | Wactawski-Wende, Jean | Wang, Chaoyu | Wang, Chih-Liang | Wang, Jiu-Cun | Wang, Junwen | Wei, Fusheng | Weiderpass, Elisabete | Weiner, George J. | Weinstein, Stephanie | Wentzensen, Nicolas | White, Emily | Witzig, Thomas E. | Wolpin, Brian M. | Wong, Maria Pik | Wu, Chen | Wu, Guoping | Wu, Junjie | Wu, Tangchun | Wu, Wei | Wu, Xifeng | Wu, Yi-Long | Wunder, Jay S. | Xiang, Yong-Bing | Xu, Jun | Xu, Ping | Yang, Pan-Chyr | Yang, Tsung-Ying | Ye, Yuanqing | Yin, Zhihua | Yokota, Jun | Yoon, Ho-Il | Yu, Chong-Jen | Yu, Herbert | Yu, Kai | Yuan, Jian-Min | Zelenetz, Andrew | Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne | Zhang, Xu-Chao | Zhang, Yawei | Zhao, Xueying | Zhao, Zhenhong | Zheng, Hong | Zheng, Tongzhang | Zheng, Wei | Zhou, Baosen | Zhu, Meng | Zucca, Mariagrazia | Boca, Simina M. | Cerhan, James R. | Ferri, Giovanni M. | Hartge, Patricia | Hsiung, Chao Agnes | Magnani, Corrado | Miligi, Lucia | Morton, Lindsay M. | Smedby, Karin E. | Teras, Lauren R. | Vijai, Joseph | Wang, Sophia S. | Brennan, Paul | Caporaso, Neil E. | Hunter, David J. | Kraft, Peter | Rothman, Nathaniel | Silverman, Debra T. | Slager, Susan L. | Chanock, Stephen J. | Chatterjee, Nilanjan
Background:
Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites.
Methods:
Between 2007 and 2014, the US National Cancer Institute has generated data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 49 492 cancer case patients and 34 131 control patients. We apply novel mixed model methodology (GCTA) to this GWAS data to estimate the heritability of individual cancers, as well as the proportion of heritability attributable to cigarette smoking in smoking-related cancers, and the genetic correlation between pairs of cancers.
Results:
GWAS heritability was statistically significant at nearly all sites, with the estimates of array-based heritability, hl 2, on the liability threshold (LT) scale ranging from 0.05 to 0.38. Estimating the combined heritability of multiple smoking characteristics, we calculate that at least 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14% to 37%) and 7% (95% CI = 4% to 11%) of the heritability for lung and bladder cancer, respectively, can be attributed to genetic determinants of smoking. Most pairs of cancers studied did not show evidence of strong genetic correlation. We found only four pairs of cancers with marginally statistically significant correlations, specifically kidney and testes (ρ = 0.73, SE = 0.28), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and pediatric osteosarcoma (ρ = 0.53, SE = 0.21), DLBCL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (ρ = 0.51, SE =0.18), and bladder and lung (ρ = 0.35, SE = 0.14). Correlation analysis also indicates that the genetic architecture of lung cancer differs between a smoking population of European ancestry and a nonsmoking Asian population, allowing for the possibility that the genetic etiology for the same disease can vary by population and environmental exposures.
Conclusion:
Our results provide important insights into the genetic architecture of cancers and suggest new avenues for investigation.
doi:10.1093/jnci/djv279
PMCID: PMC4806328  PMID: 26464424
25.  A meta-analysis of individual participant data reveals an association between circulating levels of IGF-I and prostate cancer risk 
Cancer research  2016;76(8):2288-2300.
The role of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in prostate cancer development is not fully understood. To investigate the association between circulating concentrations of IGFs (IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3) and prostate cancer risk, we pooled individual participant data from 17 prospective and two cross-sectional studies, including up to 10,554 prostate cancer cases and 13,618 control participants. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for prostate cancer based on the study-specific fifth of each analyte. Overall, IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 concentrations were positively associated with prostate cancer risk (Ptrend all ≤ 0.005), and IGFBP-1 was weakly inversely associated with risk (Ptrend = 0.05). However, heterogeneity between the prospective and cross-sectional studies was evident (Pheterogeneity = 0.03), unless the analyses were restricted to prospective studies (with the exception of IGF-II, Pheterogeneity = 0.02). For prospective studies, the OR for men in the highest versus the lowest fifth of each analyte was 1.29 (95% confidence interval=1.16-1.43) for IGF-I, 0.81 (0.68-0.96) for IGFBP-1, and 1.25 (1.12-1.40) for IGFBP-3. These associations did not differ significantly by time-to-diagnosis or tumor stage or grade. After mutual adjustment for each of the other analytes, only IGF-I remained associated with risk. Our collaborative study represents the largest pooled analysis of the relationship between prostate cancer risk and circulating concentrations of IGF-I, providing strong evidence that IGF-I is highly likely to be involved in prostate cancer development.
doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-15-1551
PMCID: PMC4873385  PMID: 26921328
prostate cancer; insulin-like growth factor; insulin-like growth factor binding protein; pooled analysis

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