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1.  Weekly nab-Paclitaxel in Metastatic Breast Cancer – Summary and Results of an Expert Panel Discussion 
Breast Care  2012;7(2):137-143.
Taxanes are regarded as the most effective single agents in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). For conventional taxanes, crucial toxicities and impairments in clinical efficacy are related to solvents necessary because of the agents’ hydrophobicity. The mandatory premedication with corticosteroids causes additional side effects. Nab-paclitaxel is a solvent-free colloidal suspension of paclitaxel and human serum albumin that exploits the physiological transport properties of albumin. It is registered as monotherapy with a recommended dose of 260 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for the treatment of patients with MBC, who have failed a first-line treatment of metastatic disease and for whom a standard anthracycline treatment is not indicated. Clinical evidence is available for the registered 3-weekly administration and for alternative weekly schedules in first and further lines of therapy of patients with MBC. During an advisory board meeting, a group of 8 German breast cancer experts reviewed the clinical data of nab-paclitaxel in MBC and discussed how nab-paclitaxel could be used in clinical practice on the basis of the current data.
PMCID: PMC3376367  PMID: 22740801
First-line therapy; Metastatic breast cancer; Chemotherapy; Weekly; nab-Paclitaxel; Paclitaxel; Docetaxel
2.  Clinical Recommendations of DEGRO and AGO on Preferred Standard Palliative Radiotherapy of Bone and Cerebral Metastases, Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression, and Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis in Breast Cancer 
Breast Care  2010;5(6):401-407.
To provide guidance for clinical practice on preferred standard palliative radiotherapy (RT) of different sites of metastasis for breast cancer patients based on current published evidence complemented by expert opinion.
The breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) and members of the Working Party of Gynecologic Oncology (AGO) Breast Committee formulated recommendations based on the panel's interpretation of the level of evidence referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine added to the AGO grades of recommendation.
For different types and sites of metastasis, distinct therapeutic goals (alleviation of symptoms, pain relief, local tumor control, prevention or improvement of neurological deficits, stabilization of the spine or other bones) require complex approaches considering individual factors (i.e. life expectancy, tumor progression at other sites). With regard to different therapeutic goals, different dose concepts and fractionation schedules, and single-versus multi-fraction palliative RT should be adapted individually.
RT is an effective tool in palliation treatment of bone metastasis (BM), cerebral metastasis (CM) and metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), or leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LC) and plays a central role in an interdisciplinary approach. Preferred technique, targeting, and different dose schedules are described in detail in the DEGRO guidelines, which are also integrated in the updated 2010 AGO recommendations.
PMCID: PMC3076353  PMID: 21494406
Metastatic breast cancer; Palliative radiation therapy; Bone metastasis; Cerebral metastasis; Metastatic spinal cord compression; Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis
3.  The Role of Targeted Agents in the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer 
Breast Care  2010;5(3):134-141.
To date, blockade of growth factor receptors is the mainstay of targeted therapy in metastatic breast cancer (mBC). Monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab and bevacizumab represent the first generation of molecular-based therapies. Both the HER2 inhibitors and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antagonists have shown synergism with a broad spectrum of established cytotoxins, thus being approved for first-line treatment of mBC in combination with taxanes. As a next step, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been integrated into daily routine as an alternative approach for targeting HER2: The dual HER1/2 inhibitor lapatinib demonstrated activity in trastuzumab-pretreated mBC patients in combination with capecitabine. Furthermore, chemotherapy-free regimens (trastuzumab or lapatinib plus aromatase inhibitors) have been identified as additional options for hormone receptor (HR)- and HER2-positive patients. Recently published data indicate that a combination of two biologicals such as lapatinib and trastuzumab can be effective as a treatment beyond trastuzumab related progression. Multitarget TKIs have the potential to inhibit several signaling pathways involved in breast cancer-related angiogenesis. Until now, they have failed to show a clear benefit in mBC. On the other hand, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition, mediated by a new class of small molecules, is an interesting area of investigation. Future directions of research in HER2-positive breast cancer focus on the evaluation of novel antibodies (pertuzumab, T-DM1), and irreversible TKIs (neratinib, BIBW 2992) and inhibitors of HER2-related downstream signaling (mTOR, TORC 1/2, PI3K/Akt) and of receptor cross-talk (IGFR).
PMCID: PMC2931051  PMID: 20847826
Breast cancer, metastatic; Anti-angiogenesis; Antibody; PARP inhibition; Multitargeting
4.  Targeted Therapy of Breast Cancer – New Insights and Perspectives 
Breast Care  2008;3(6):395-398.
PMCID: PMC2931026  PMID: 21048909

Results 1-4 (4)