PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-4 (4)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Comparison of fully automated and semi-automated biopsy needles for lung biopsy under CT fluoroscopic guidance 
The British Journal of Radiology  2012;85(1011):208-213.
Objective
The aim of this study was to compare two different automated biopsy needles, a fully automated biopsy needle (Monopty; Bard, Covington, GA) and a semi-automated biopsy needle (Temno; Bauer Medical, Clearwater, FL), for lung biopsy.
Methods
50 consecutive percutaneous lung biopsies using the Monopty needle between June 2006 and January 2007 and 66 consecutive lung biopsies for 1 nodule in each session using the Temno needle between February 2007 and August 2008 were performed under CT fluoroscopic guidance followed by histopathological evaluation.
Results
In 42/50 lung biopsies performed with the Monopty needle and 54/66 lung biopsies performed with the Temno needle, the final diagnosis was confirmed by independent surgical pathological findings or clinical follow-up. Sufficient samples for histopathological evaluation were obtained in all 50 (100%) biopsies using the Monopty needle and in 55 (83.3%) of the 66 biopsies using the Temno needle (p<0.01). Accurate diagnosis was achieved in 41 (97.6%) of 42 biopsies using the Monopty needle and in 45 (83.3%) of 54 biopsies using the Temno needle (p=0.04). Biopsy-induced complications were pneumothorax, haemoptysis and haemothorax in 44.0%, 10.0% and 6.0% of biopsies, respectively, using the Monopty needle and in 48.3%, 8.3% and 3.3%, respectively, using the Temno needle.
Conclusion
There is a possibility that a fully automated biopsy needle such as the Monopty is more useful for CT scan-guided lung biopsy than semi-automated biopsy needles.
doi:10.1259/bjr/15132704
PMCID: PMC3473986  PMID: 21828150
2.  Post-traumatic rapidly enlarging mucinous carcinoma of the breast with intratumoural haemorrhage: MRI appearances with pathological correlation 
The British Journal of Radiology  2011;84(1002):e118-e120.
Pure mucinous carcinoma of the breast is a histological type of invasive carcinoma and generally shows a slow growth pattern. Rapid growth and intratumoural haemorrhage are rare and there have been no reports presenting such a clinical course and associated radiographic findings. We report a case with atypical rapidly enlarging mucinous carcinoma of the breast after trauma, in which MRI closely reflected the histopathological background and was thought to be useful for differential diagnosis from other highly malignant breast tumours.
doi:10.1259/bjr/72140684
PMCID: PMC3473633  PMID: 21606064
3.  Hepatic artery-targeting guidewire technique during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt 
The British Journal of Radiology  2011;84(1000):315-318.
Objective
This study evaluated the feasibility and safety of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure using the hepatic artery-targeting guidewire technique for the puncture step.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed 11 consecutive patients (5 men and 6 women, aged 46–76 years (mean 64 years)) with portal hypertension in whom the TIPS procedure was performed. As the first step in the TIPS procedure in all cases, a micro-guidewire was inserted into the hepatic arterial branch accompanying the portal venous branch through a microcatheter coaxially advanced from a 5-French catheter positioned in the coeliac or common hepatic artery. At the puncture step, the tip of the metallic cannula was aimed 1 cm posterior to the distal part of this micro-guidewire, after which the TIPS procedure was performed. Success rate, number of punctures and complications were evaluated.
Results
The TIPS procedure was successfully performed in all 11 patients. The mean number of punctures until success in entering the targeted portal venous branch was 5 (range 1–14). In 3 patients (27%), the right portal venous branch was entered at the first puncture attempt. The hepatic artery was punctured once in one patient and the bile duct was punctured once in another patient. No serious procedure-induced complications occurred.
Conclusion
The TIPS procedure can be accomplished safely, precisely and relatively easily using the hepatic artery-targeting guidewire technique.
doi:10.1259/bjr/19972953
PMCID: PMC3473469  PMID: 20716652
4.  Embolisation of the right gastric artery in patients undergoing hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy using two possible approach routes 
The British Journal of Radiology  2010;83(991):578-584.
We used a retrospective non-randomised study to investigate the clinical effect of selective embolisation of the right gastric artery before hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) using a port-catheter system. We evaluated whether the hepatic artery or the left gastric artery is the better approach for selecting the right gastric artery. A total of 367 patients (244 men and 123 women; mean age, 64.1 years) with unresectable advanced liver cancer underwent percutaneous implantation of a port-catheter system. In 294 of these patients, right gastric arterial embolisation with microcoils was attempted before placement of the port-catheter system to prevent gastric mucosal lesions. Approach was either through the hepatic artery (175 patients) or through the left gastric artery (119 patients), with success rates in catheterising the right gastric artery of 78.3% and 77.3%, respectively. If the attempt was unsuccessful, the catheter was redirected to the alternative approach, which increased the final success rate to 96.3%. Only seven patients experienced gastroduodenal mucosal lesions acutely after HAIC, as revealed by endoscopy. Embolisation of the right gastric artery is a feasible procedure that can reduce the incidence of gastric mucosal lesions associated with HAIC. Approach through either the hepatic artery or the left gastric artery is equally acceptable.
doi:10.1259/bjr/51736762
PMCID: PMC3473675  PMID: 20442280

Results 1-4 (4)