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1.  Can point doses predict volumetric dose to rectum and bladder: a CT-based planning study in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma? 
The British Journal of Radiology  2011;84(1001):441-448.
Objective
Point doses, as defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), are classically used to evaluate doses to the rectum and bladder in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in cervical cancer. Several studies have shown good correlation between the ICRU point doses and the volumetric doses to these organs. In the present study we attempted to evaluate whether this correlation could be used to predict the volumetric doses to these organs.
Methods
A total of 150 HDR-ICBT insertions performed between December 2006 and June 2008 were randomly divided into two groups. Group A (n=50) was used to derive the correlation between the point and volumetric doses using regression analysis. This was tested in Group B (n=100) insertions using studentised residuals and Bland–Altman plots.
Results
Significant correlations were obtained for all volumetric doses and ICRU point doses for rectum and bladder in Group A insertions. The strongest correlation was found for the dose to 2 cc volumes (D2cc). The correlation coefficients for bladder and rectal D2cc versus the respective ICRU point doses were 0.82 and 0.77, respectively (p<0.001). Statistical validation of equations generated in Group B showed mean studentised residual values of 0.001 and 0.000 for the bladder and rectum. However, Bland–Altman analysis showed that the error range for these equations for bladder and rectum were ±64% and ±41% of the point A dose, respectively, which makes these equations unreliable for clinical use.
Conclusion
Volumetric imaging is essential to obtain proper information about volumetric doses.
doi:10.1259/bjr/33758793
PMCID: PMC3473656  PMID: 21511749
2.  Dynamic nature of the CT angiographic “spot sign” 
The British Journal of Radiology  2010;83(994):e216-e219.
The “spot sign”, first described in 2007, has shown that a focal area of contrast extravasation within an intracerebral haematoma (ICH) can be correlated with haematoma expansion. We describe a case where time-resolved dynamic CT angiography (dCTA) shows the appearance of the “spot sign” only in later images. This finding highlights the importance of timing of the static CT angiogram which, if performed too early, might result in a false-negative diagnosis.
doi:10.1259/bjr/74416385
PMCID: PMC3473752  PMID: 20846980
3.  Cerebral haemorrhage from a remote varix in the venous outflow of an arteriovenous malformation treated successfully by embolisation 
The British Journal of Radiology  2010;83(991):e129-e134.
The “spot sign”, described in 2007, has shown that a focal area of contrast extravasation within an intracerebral haematoma (ICH) can be correlated with haematoma expansion. Here we describe a case where time-resolved dynamic CT angiography (dCTA) shows the appearance of the “spot sign” only in later images. This shows the importance of timing of static CT angiogram that, if performed too early, might result in a false negative diagnosis.
doi:10.1259/bjr/30362699
PMCID: PMC3473680  PMID: 20603396

Results 1-3 (3)