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1.  School meals and the nutrition of schoolchildren. 
The contribution of school meals to the nutrition of 778 primary and secondary schoolchildren attending schools in Kent was assessed using information collected during a survey made in 1968-70 which included a weighed diet record, a socioeconomic questionnaire, and a medical examination. Younger children, those from larger families, those without fathers, and those whose mothers worked were more likely to take school meals. Significantly more children from lower social classes and without fathers received them free. School meals made an important contribution to the nutrition of schoolchildren. Children who took them had higher weekday lunchtime nutrient intake during term-time. Children in lower social classes, larger families, and without fathers who took school meals obtained a higher proportion of their weekday intake of nutrients from lunchtime than other children. This applied in particular to nutrients important for growth. School meals consumed by children in the study broadly met the standard set by the Department of Education and Science. The mean energy and protein content of school meals consumed in the study was slightly lower and the mean fat content higher than the standard set for the meal. The mean sugar content was about one-third higher than the suggested amount of sugar to be included in a school meal. There was no evidence that children who took school meals were taller, heavier, had greater skinfold thickness, or were more likely to be assessed as obese than other children.
PMCID: PMC478912  PMID: 1191886
2.  Influence of some social and environmental factors on the nutrient intake and nutritional status of schoolchildren. 
Only children had significantly higher intakes of many nutrients and nutrients/1000 kcal than other children. A higher proportion of only children was found to be obese. There were no significant differences according to birthrank in intakes by children. There were more obese children among the fatherless than those with fathers, in particular among those whose mothers were widowed. However, this was not accounted for by the present dietary findings, since fatherless children had lower intakes of carbohydrate and added sugar. There were no differences in nutrient intake or intake/1000 kcal by mother's country of origin or her level of education, or by disposable income.
PMCID: PMC478900  PMID: 1182353

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