PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-6 (6)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Significance analysis and statistical dissection of variably methylated regions 
Biostatistics (Oxford, England)  2011;13(1):166-178.
It has recently been proposed that variation in DNA methylation at specific genomic locations may play an important role in the development of complex diseases such as cancer. Here, we develop 1- and 2-group multiple testing procedures for identifying and quantifying regions of DNA methylation variability. Our method is the first genome-wide statistical significance calculation for increased or differential variability, as opposed to the traditional approach of testing for mean changes. We apply these procedures to genome-wide methylation data obtained from biological and technical replicates and provide the first statistical proof that variably methylated regions exist and are due to interindividual variation. We also show that differentially variable regions in colon tumor and normal tissue show enrichment of genes regulating gene expression, cell morphogenesis, and development, supporting a biological role for DNA methylation variability in cancer.
doi:10.1093/biostatistics/kxr013
PMCID: PMC3276267  PMID: 21685414
Bump finding; Functional data analysis; Multiple testing; Preprocessing; Variably methylation regions (VMRs)
2.  Accurate genome-scale percentage DNA methylation estimates from microarray data 
Biostatistics (Oxford, England)  2010;12(2):197-210.
DNA methylation is a key regulator of gene function in a multitude of both normal and abnormal biological processes, but tools to elucidate its roles on a genome-wide scale are still in their infancy. Methylation sensitive restriction enzymes and microarrays provide a potential high-throughput, low-cost platform to allow methylation profiling. However, accurate absolute methylation estimates have been elusive due to systematic errors and unwanted variability. Previous microarray preprocessing procedures, mostly developed for expression arrays, fail to adequately normalize methylation-related data since they rely on key assumptions that are violated in the case of DNA methylation. We develop a normalization strategy tailored to DNA methylation data and an empirical Bayes percentage methylation estimator that together yield accurate absolute methylation estimates that can be compared across samples. We illustrate the method on data generated to detect methylation differences between tissues and between normal and tumor colon samples.
doi:10.1093/biostatistics/kxq055
PMCID: PMC3062148  PMID: 20858772
DNA methylation; Epigenetics; Microarray
3.  Removing technical variability in RNA-seq data using conditional quantile normalization 
Biostatistics (Oxford, England)  2012;13(2):204-216.
The ability to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale is one of the most promising accomplishments in molecular biology. Microarrays, the technology that first permitted this, were riddled with problems due to unwanted sources of variability. Many of these problems are now mitigated, after a decade's worth of statistical methodology development. The recently developed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology has generated much excitement in part due to claims of reduced variability in comparison to microarrays. However, we show that RNA-seq data demonstrate unwanted and obscuring variability similar to what was first observed in microarrays. In particular, we find guanine-cytosine content (GC-content) has a strong sample-specific effect on gene expression measurements that, if left uncorrected, leads to false positives in downstream results. We also report on commonly observed data distortions that demonstrate the need for data normalization. Here, we describe a statistical methodology that improves precision by 42% without loss of accuracy. Our resulting conditional quantile normalization algorithm combines robust generalized regression to remove systematic bias introduced by deterministic features such as GC-content and quantile normalization to correct for global distortions.
doi:10.1093/biostatistics/kxr054
PMCID: PMC3297825  PMID: 22285995
Gene expression; Normalization; RNA sequencing
4.  A multilevel model to address batch effects in copy number estimation using SNP arrays 
Submicroscopic changes in chromosomal DNA copy number dosage are common and have been implicated in many heritable diseases and cancers. Recent high-throughput technologies have a resolution that permits the detection of segmental changes in DNA copy number that span thousands of base pairs in the genome. Genomewide association studies (GWAS) may simultaneously screen for copy number phenotype and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) phenotype associations as part of the analytic strategy. However, genomewide array analyses are particularly susceptible to batch effects as the logistics of preparing DNA and processing thousands of arrays often involves multiple laboratories and technicians, or changes over calendar time to the reagents and laboratory equipment. Failure to adjust for batch effects can lead to incorrect inference and requires inefficient post hoc quality control procedures to exclude regions that are associated with batch. Our work extends previous model-based approaches for copy number estimation by explicitly modeling batch and using shrinkage to improve locus-specific estimates of copy number uncertainty. Key features of this approach include the use of biallelic genotype calls from experimental data to estimate batch-specific and locus-specific parameters of background and signal without the requirement of training data. We illustrate these ideas using a study of bipolar disease and a study of chromosome 21 trisomy. The former has batch effects that dominate much of the observed variation in the quantile-normalized intensities, while the latter illustrates the robustness of our approach to a data set in which approximately 27% of the samples have altered copy number. Locus-specific estimates of copy number can be plotted on the copy number scale to investigate mosaicism and guide the choice of appropriate downstream approaches for smoothing the copy number as a function of physical position. The software is open source and implemented in the R package crlmm at Bioconductor (http:www.bioconductor.org).
doi:10.1093/biostatistics/kxq043
PMCID: PMC3006124  PMID: 20625178
Bioinformatics; Hierarchical models; DNA copy number variations; Single nucleotide polymorphism array
5.  Redefining CpG islands using hidden Markov models 
Biostatistics (Oxford, England)  2010;11(3):499-514.
The DNA of most vertebrates is depleted in CpG dinucleotide: a C followed by a G in the 5′ to 3′ direction. CpGs are the target for DNA methylation, a chemical modification of cytosine (C) heritable during cell division and the most well-characterized epigenetic mechanism. The remaining CpGs tend to cluster in regions referred to as CpG islands (CGI). Knowing CGI locations is important because they mark functionally relevant epigenetic loci in development and disease. For various mammals, including human, a readily available and widely used list of CGI is available from the UCSC Genome Browser. This list was derived using algorithms that search for regions satisfying a definition of CGI proposed by Gardiner-Garden and Frommer more than 20 years ago. Recent findings, enabled by advances in technology that permit direct measurement of epigenetic endpoints at a whole-genome scale, motivate the need to adapt the current CGI definition. In this paper, we propose a procedure, guided by hidden Markov models, that permits an extensible approach to detecting CGI. The main advantage of our approach over others is that it summarizes the evidence for CGI status as probability scores. This provides flexibility in the definition of a CGI and facilitates the creation of CGI lists for other species. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by generating the first CGI lists for invertebrates, and the fact that we can create CGI lists that substantially increases overlap with recently discovered epigenetic marks. A CGI list and the probability scores, as a function of genome location, for each species are available at http://www.rafalab.org.
doi:10.1093/biostatistics/kxq005
PMCID: PMC2883304  PMID: 20212320
CpG island; Epigenetics; Hidden Markov model; Sequence analysis
6.  Frozen robust multiarray analysis (fRMA) 
Biostatistics (Oxford, England)  2010;11(2):242-253.
Robust multiarray analysis (RMA) is the most widely used preprocessing algorithm for Affymetrix and Nimblegen gene expression microarrays. RMA performs background correction, normalization, and summarization in a modular way. The last 2 steps require multiple arrays to be analyzed simultaneously. The ability to borrow information across samples provides RMA various advantages. For example, the summarization step fits a parametric model that accounts for probe effects, assumed to be fixed across arrays, and improves outlier detection. Residuals, obtained from the fitted model, permit the creation of useful quality metrics. However, the dependence on multiple arrays has 2 drawbacks: (1) RMA cannot be used in clinical settings where samples must be processed individually or in small batches and (2) data sets preprocessed separately are not comparable. We propose a preprocessing algorithm, frozen RMA (fRMA), which allows one to analyze microarrays individually or in small batches and then combine the data for analysis. This is accomplished by utilizing information from the large publicly available microarray databases. In particular, estimates of probe-specific effects and variances are precomputed and frozen. Then, with new data sets, these are used in concert with information from the new arrays to normalize and summarize the data. We find that fRMA is comparable to RMA when the data are analyzed as a single batch and outperforms RMA when analyzing multiple batches. The methods described here are implemented in the R package fRMA and are currently available for download from the software section of http://rafalab.jhsph.edu.
doi:10.1093/biostatistics/kxp059
PMCID: PMC2830579  PMID: 20097884
Affymetrix; ArrayExpress; GEO; Microarray; Preprocessing; Single-array

Results 1-6 (6)