PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-6 (6)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Poly(A) motif prediction using spectral latent features from human DNA sequences 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(13):i316-i325.
Motivation: Polyadenylation is the addition of a poly(A) tail to an RNA molecule. Identifying DNA sequence motifs that signal the addition of poly(A) tails is essential to improved genome annotation and better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms and stability of mRNA.
Existing poly(A) motif predictors demonstrate that information extracted from the surrounding nucleotide sequences of candidate poly(A) motifs can differentiate true motifs from the false ones to a great extent. A variety of sophisticated features has been explored, including sequential, structural, statistical, thermodynamic and evolutionary properties. However, most of these methods involve extensive manual feature engineering, which can be time-consuming and can require in-depth domain knowledge.
Results: We propose a novel machine-learning method for poly(A) motif prediction by marrying generative learning (hidden Markov models) and discriminative learning (support vector machines). Generative learning provides a rich palette on which the uncertainty and diversity of sequence information can be handled, while discriminative learning allows the performance of the classification task to be directly optimized. Here, we used hidden Markov models for fitting the DNA sequence dynamics, and developed an efficient spectral algorithm for extracting latent variable information from these models. These spectral latent features were then fed into support vector machines to fine-tune the classification performance.
We evaluated our proposed method on a comprehensive human poly(A) dataset that consists of 14 740 samples from 12 of the most abundant variants of human poly(A) motifs. Compared with one of the previous state-of-the-art methods in the literature (the random forest model with expert-crafted features), our method reduces the average error rate, false-negative rate and false-positive rate by 26, 15 and 35%, respectively. Meanwhile, our method makes ∼30% fewer error predictions relative to the other string kernels. Furthermore, our method can be used to visualize the importance of oligomers and positions in predicting poly(A) motifs, from which we can observe a number of characteristics in the surrounding regions of true and false motifs that have not been reported before.
Availability: http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx
Contact: lsong@cc.gatech.edu or xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt218
PMCID: PMC3694652  PMID: 23813000
2.  A framework for scalable parameter estimation of gene circuit models using structural information 
Bioinformatics  2013;29(13):i98-i107.
Motivation: Systematic and scalable parameter estimation is a key to construct complex gene regulatory models and to ultimately facilitate an integrative systems biology approach to quantitatively understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning gene regulation.
Results: Here, we report a novel framework for efficient and scalable parameter estimation that focuses specifically on modeling of gene circuits. Exploiting the structure commonly found in gene circuit models, this framework decomposes a system of coupled rate equations into individual ones and efficiently integrates them separately to reconstruct the mean time evolution of the gene products. The accuracy of the parameter estimates is refined by iteratively increasing the accuracy of numerical integration using the model structure. As a case study, we applied our framework to four gene circuit models with complex dynamics based on three synthetic datasets and one time series microarray data set. We compared our framework to three state-of-the-art parameter estimation methods and found that our approach consistently generated higher quality parameter solutions efficiently. Although many general-purpose parameter estimation methods have been applied for modeling of gene circuits, our results suggest that the use of more tailored approaches to use domain-specific information may be a key to reverse engineering of complex biological systems.
Availability: http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx
Contact: xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btt232
PMCID: PMC3694671  PMID: 23813015
3.  Protein domain recurrence and order can enhance prediction of protein functions 
Bioinformatics  2012;28(18):i444-i450.
Motivation: Burgeoning sequencing technologies have generated massive amounts of genomic and proteomic data. Annotating the functions of proteins identified in this data has become a big and crucial problem. Various computational methods have been developed to infer the protein functions based on either the sequences or domains of proteins. The existing methods, however, ignore the recurrence and the order of the protein domains in this function inference.
Results: We developed two new methods to infer protein functions based on protein domain recurrence and domain order. Our first method, DRDO, calculates the posterior probability of the Gene Ontology terms based on domain recurrence and domain order information, whereas our second method, DRDO-NB, relies on the naïve Bayes methodology using the same domain architecture information. Our large-scale benchmark comparisons show strong improvements in the accuracy of the protein function inference achieved by our new methods, demonstrating that domain recurrence and order can provide important information for inference of protein functions.
Availability: The new models are provided as open source programs at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx.
Contact: dkihara@cs.purdue.edu, xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa
Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics Online.
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/bts398
PMCID: PMC3436825  PMID: 22962465
4.  WaVPeak: picking NMR peaks through wavelet-based smoothing and volume-based filtering 
Bioinformatics  2012;28(7):914-920.
Motivation: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been widely used as a powerful tool to determine the 3D structures of proteins in vivo. However, the post-spectra processing stage of NMR structure determination usually involves a tremendous amount of time and expert knowledge, which includes peak picking, chemical shift assignment and structure calculation steps. Detecting accurate peaks from the NMR spectra is a prerequisite for all following steps, and thus remains a key problem in automatic NMR structure determination.
Results: We introduce WaVPeak, a fully automatic peak detection method. WaVPeak first smoothes the given NMR spectrum by wavelets. The peaks are then identified as the local maxima. The false positive peaks are filtered out efficiently by considering the volume of the peaks.
WaVPeak has two major advantages over the state-of-the-art peak-picking methods. First, through wavelet-based smoothing, WaVPeak does not eliminate any data point in the spectra. Therefore, WaVPeak is able to detect weak peaks that are embedded in the noise level. NMR spectroscopists need the most help isolating these weak peaks. Second, WaVPeak estimates the volume of the peaks to filter the false positives. This is more reliable than intensity-based filters that are widely used in existing methods.
We evaluate the performance of WaVPeak on the benchmark set proposed by PICKY (Alipanahi et al., 2009), one of the most accurate methods in the literature. The dataset comprises 32 2D and 3D spectra from eight different proteins. Experimental results demonstrate that WaVPeak achieves an average of 96%, 91%, 88%, 76% and 85% recall on 15N-HSQC, HNCO, HNCA, HNCACB and CBCA(CO)NH, respectively. When the same number of peaks are considered, WaVPeak significantly outperforms PICKY.
Availability: WaVPeak is an open source program. The source code and two test spectra of WaVPeak are available at http://faculty.kaust.edu.sa/sites/xingao/Pages/Publications.aspx. The online server is under construction.
Contact: statliuzhi@xmu.edu.cn; ahmed.abbas@kaust.edu.sa; majing@ust.hk; xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/bts078
PMCID: PMC3315717  PMID: 22328784
5.  PICKY: a novel SVD-based NMR spectra peak picking method 
Bioinformatics  2009;25(12):i268-i275.
Motivation: Picking peaks from experimental NMR spectra is a key unsolved problem for automated NMR protein structure determination. Such a process is a prerequisite for resonance assignment, nuclear overhauser enhancement (NOE) distance restraint assignment, and structure calculation tasks. Manual or semi-automatic peak picking, which is currently the prominent way used in NMR labs, is tedious, time consuming and costly.
Results: We introduce new ideas, including noise-level estimation, component forming and sub-division, singular value decomposition (SVD)-based peak picking and peak pruning and refinement. PICKY is developed as an automated peak picking method. Different from the previous research on peak picking, we provide a systematic study of the proposed method. PICKY is tested on 32 real 2D and 3D spectra of eight target proteins, and achieves an average of 88% recall and 74% precision. PICKY is efficient. It takes PICKY on average 15.7 s to process an NMR spectrum. More important than these numbers, PICKY actually works in practice. We feed peak lists generated by PICKY to IPASS for resonance assignment, feed IPASS assignment to SPARTA for fragments generation, and feed SPARTA fragments to FALCON for structure calculation. This results in high-resolution structures of several proteins, for example, TM1112, at 1.25 Å.
Availability: PICKY is available upon request. The peak lists of PICKY can be easily loaded by SPARKY to enable a better interactive strategy for rapid peak picking.
Contact: mli@uwaterloo.ca
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btp225
PMCID: PMC2687979  PMID: 19477998
6.  Designing succinct structural alphabets 
Bioinformatics  2008;24(13):i182-i189.
Motivation: The 3D structure of a protein sequence can be assembled from the substructures corresponding to small segments of this sequence. For each small sequence segment, there are only a few more likely substructures. We call them the ‘structural alphabet’ for this segment. Classical approaches such as ROSETTA used sequence profile and secondary structure information, to predict structural fragments. In contrast, we utilize more structural information, such as solvent accessibility and contact capacity, for finding structural fragments.
Results: Integer linear programming technique is applied to derive the best combination of these sequence and structural information items. This approach generates significantly more accurate and succinct structural alphabets with more than 50% improvement over the previous accuracies. With these novel structural alphabets, we are able to construct more accurate protein structures than the state-of-art ab initio protein structure prediction programs such as ROSETTA. We are also able to reduce the Kolodny's library size by a factor of 8, at the same accuracy.
Availability: The online FRazor server is under construction
Contact:scli@uwaterloo.ca,mli@uwaterloo.ca, j3xu@tti-c.org
doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btn165
PMCID: PMC2718643  PMID: 18586712

Results 1-6 (6)