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1.  The study of surface wetting, nanobubbles and boundary slip with an applied voltage: A review 
Summary
The drag of fluid flow at the solid–liquid interface in the micro/nanoscale is an important issue in micro/nanofluidic systems. Drag depends on the surface wetting, nanobubbles, surface charge and boundary slip. Some researchers have focused on the relationship between these interface properties. In this review, the influence of an applied voltage on the surface wettability, nanobubbles, surface charge density and slip length are discussed. The contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of a droplet of deionized (DI) water on a hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) surface were measured with applied direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) voltages. The nanobubbles in DI water and three kinds of saline solution on a PS surface were imaged when a voltage was applied. The influence of the surface charge density on the nanobubbles was analyzed. Then the slip length and the electrostatic force on the probe were measured on an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) surface with applied voltage. The influence of the surface charge on the boundary slip and drag of fluid flow has been discussed. Finally, the influence of the applied voltage on the surface wetting, nanobubbles, surface charge, boundary slip and the drag of liquid flow are summarized. With a smaller surface charge density which could be achieved by applying a voltage on the surface, larger and fewer nanobubbles, a larger slip length and a smaller drag of liquid flow could be found.
doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.117
PMCID: PMC4143124  PMID: 25161839
atomic force microscopy; boundary slip; electrowetting; nanobubbles; surface charge
2.  Scale effects of nanomechanical properties and deformation behavior of Au nanoparticle and thin film using depth sensing nanoindentation 
Summary
Nanoscale research of bulk solid surfaces, thin films and micro- and nano-objects has shown that mechanical properties are enhanced at smaller scales. Experimental studies that directly compare local with global deformation are lacking. In this research, spherical Au nanoparticles, 500 nm in diameter and 100 nm thick Au films were selected. Nanoindentation (local deformation) and compression tests (global deformation) were performed with a nanoindenter using a sharp Berkovich tip and a flat punch, respectively. Data from nanoindentation studies were compared with bulk to study scale effects. Nanoscale hardness of the film was found to be higher than the nanoparticles with both being higher than bulk. Both nanoparticles and film showed increasing hardness for decreasing penetration depth. For the film, creep and strain rate effects were observed. In comparison of nanoindentation and compression tests, more pop-ins during loading were observed during the nanoindentation of nanoparticles. Repeated compression tests of nanoparticles were performed that showed a strain hardening effect and increased pop-ins during subsequent loads.
doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.94
PMCID: PMC4077422  PMID: 24991519
gold (Au); Hall–Petch; hardness; nanoindentation; nano-objects
3.  The surface microstructure of cusps and leaflets in rabbit and mouse heart valves 
Summary
In this investigation, scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the microstructure on the surfaces of animal heart valve cusps/leaflets. The results showed that though these surfaces appear smooth to the naked eye, they are actually comprised of a double hierarchical structure consisting of a cobblestone-like microstructure and nano-cilia along with mastoids with a directional arrangement. Such nanostructures could play a very important role in the hemocompatibility characteristics of heart valves. On this basis, the model of the microstructure was constructed and theoretical analysis was used to obtain optimal geometric parameters for the rough surface of artificial valve cusps/leaflets. This model may help improve reconstructive techniques and it may be beneficial in the design and fabrication of valve substitutes or partial substitutes. Namely, the model may help ameliorate heart valve replacement surgery.
doi:10.3762/bjnano.5.73
PMCID: PMC4077300  PMID: 24991498
contact angle; geometric parameter; heart valve; hemocompatibility; microstructure
4.  Effect of spherical Au nanoparticles on nanofriction and wear reduction in dry and liquid environments 
Summary
Nano-object additives are used in tribological applications as well as in various applications in liquids requiring controlled manipulation and targeting. On the macroscale, nanoparticles in solids and liquids have been shown to reduce friction and wear. On the nanoscale, atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies have been performed in single- and multiple-nanoparticle contact, in dry environments, to characterize friction forces and wear. However, limited studies in submerged liquid environments have been performed and further studies are needed. In this paper, spherical Au nanoparticles were studied for their effect on friction and wear under dry conditions and submerged in water. In single-nanoparticle contact, individual nanoparticles, deposited on silicon, were manipulated with a sharp tip and the friction force was determined. Multiple-nanoparticle contact sliding experiments were performed on nanoparticle-coated silicon with a glass sphere. Wear tests were performed on the nanoscale with AFM as well as on the macroscale by using a ball-on-flat tribometer to relate friction and wear reduction on the nanoscale and macroscale. Results indicate that the addition of Au nanoparticles reduces friction and wear.
doi:10.3762/bjnano.3.85
PMCID: PMC3512125  PMID: 23213639
AFM; drug delivery; friction; gold nanoparticles; MEMS/NEMS; nanomanipulation
5.  Friction and durability of virgin and damaged skin with and without skin cream treatment using atomic force microscopy 
Summary
Skin can be damaged by the environment easily. Skin cream is an effective and rapid way to moisten the skin by changing the skin surface properties. Rat skin and pig skin are common animal models for studies and were used as skin samples in this study. The nano- and macroscale friction and durability of damaged skin were measured and compared with those of virgin (intact/undamaged) skin. The effect of skin cream on friction and durability of damaged and virgin skin samples is discussed. The effects of velocity, normal load, relative humidity and number of cycles were studied. The nanoscale studies were performed by using atomic force microscope (AFM), and macroscale studies were performed by using a pin-on-disk (POD) reciprocating tribometer. It was found that damaged skin has different mechanical properties, surface roughness, contact angle, friction and durability compared to that of virgin skin. But similar changes occur after skin cream treatment. Rat and pig skin show similar trends in friction and durability.
doi:10.3762/bjnano.3.83
PMCID: PMC3512123  PMID: 23213637
atomic force microscopy; damaged skin; pig skin; rat skin; skin cream
6.  Biomimetics inspired surfaces for drag reduction and oleophobicity/philicity 
Summary
The emerging field of biomimetics allows one to mimic biology or nature to develop nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes which provide desirable properties. Hierarchical structures with dimensions of features ranging from the macroscale to the nanoscale are extremely common in nature and possess properties of interest. There are a large number of objects including bacteria, plants, land and aquatic animals, and seashells with properties of commercial interest. Certain plant leaves, such as lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) leaves, are known to be superhydrophobic and self-cleaning due to the hierarchical surface roughness and presence of a wax layer. In addition to a self-cleaning effect, these surfaces with a high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis also exhibit low adhesion and drag reduction for fluid flow. An aquatic animal, such as a shark, is another model from nature for the reduction of drag in fluid flow. The artificial surfaces inspired from the shark skin and lotus leaf have been created, and in this article the influence of structure on drag reduction efficiency is reviewed. Biomimetic-inspired oleophobic surfaces can be used to prevent contamination of the underwater parts of ships by biological and organic contaminants, including oil. The article also reviews the wetting behavior of oil droplets on various superoleophobic surfaces created in the lab.
doi:10.3762/bjnano.2.9
PMCID: PMC3148050  PMID: 21977417
aquatic animals; biomimetics; drag; lotus plants; shark skin; superhydrophobicity; superoleophobicity

Results 1-6 (6)