PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Intensity versus duration of physical activity: implications for the metabolic syndrome. A prospective cohort study 
BMJ Open  2012;2(5):e001711.
Objectives
To explore the relative importance of leisure time physical activity (LTPA), walking and jogging on risk of developing the metabolic syndrome (MS).
Design
A prospective cohort study.
Setting
The Copenhagen City Heart Study.
Participants
10 135 men and women aged 21–98 years who attended an initial examination in 1991–1994 and were re-examined after 10 years.
Outcome measures
The association of LTPA, jogging, walking speed and walking volume with MS at baseline and at 10-year follow-up was investigated by multiple logistic regression analyses.
Results
Baseline prevalence of MS was 20.7% in women and 27.3% in men. In both women and men, MS prevalence was associated with lower LTPA and walking speed and was lower in joggers compared to non-joggers. In subjects free of MS at baseline, 15.4% had developed MS at 10-year follow-up. Risk of developing MS was reduced in subjects with moderate or high LTPA, higher walking speed and in joggers whereas a higher volume of walking was not associated with reduced risk. After multiple adjustment, odds ratio (OR) of developing MS in moderate/high LTPA was 0.71 (95% CI 0.50 to 1.01), fast walking speed 0.51 (0.33 to 0.80) and joggers 0.60 (0.37 to 0.95) and walking >1 h daily 1.22 (0.91 to 1.65).
Conclusions
Our results confirm the role of physical activity in reducing MS risk and suggest that intensity more than volume of physical activity is important.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001711
PMCID: PMC3488727  PMID: 23045359
Preventive Medicine; Epidemiology; Public Health; Sports Medicine
2.  Relationship between years in the trade and the development of radiographic knee osteoarthritis and MRI-detected meniscal tears and bursitis in floor layers. A cross-sectional study of a historical cohort 
BMJ Open  2012;2(3):e001109.
Objectives
An increased risk of developing knee disorders including radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been shown among workers with kneeling working demands. There may also be a dose-related association between duration of employment in occupations with kneeling work and development of radiographic knee OA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected meniscal tears and bursitis.
Design
A cross-sectional study of a historical cohort.
Setting
Members of the trade unions for floor layers and graphic designers in Denmark.
Participants
92 male floor layers and 49 graphic designers aged 36–70 years were randomly selected among participants from a clinical and radiographic study of 156 floor layers and 152 graphic designers.
Outcome measures
Radiographic tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) knee-OA and MRI-detected meniscal tears and bursitis. Results were adjusted for age, earlier knee traumas, sports activities and body mass index in logistic regression models. Association between TF OA and years in the floor-laying trade was graphically examined by a restricted cubic spline with four knots.
Results
Increase in number of years with exposure to kneeling work is associated with radiographic TF knee OA with ORs 0.7, 95% CI 0.07 to 4.42; OR 1.89, 95% CI 0.29 to 12.3; OR 4.82, 95% CI 1.38 to 17 for <20 years, 20–30 years and >30 years of kneeling work, respectively. MRI-verified medial meniscal tears was increased among subjects with kneeling work with OR 1.96, 95% CI 0.79 to 4.88 to OR 4.73, 95% CI 1.16 to 19.4 but was not associated with duration of employment. Periarticular bursitis was increased in subjects with <20 years of kneeling working activity. Lateral meniscal tears and PF knee OA were not associated with duration of kneeling working activity or with kneeling work in general.
Conclusions
The findings suggest a dose–response relationship for radiographic TF knee OA in floor layers with a significant amount of kneeling work and an increase of MRI-verified medial meniscal tears among workers with kneeling work.
Article summary
Article focus
An increased risk of developing knee disorders including radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been shown among workers with kneeling working demands. Workers with kneeling working positions have an increased risk of developing knee complaints in a much higher degree than can be explained by osteoarthritis.
It is unknown if there is a dose-related association between duration of employment in occupations with kneeling work and development of radiographic knee OA including both tibiofemoral and patellofemoral knee OA.
It is unknown if MRI-detected meniscal tears and bursitis around the knees can explain some of the knee complaints in subjects with kneeling work.
Key messages
The study shows a dose-response relationship between the duration of employment in work with kneeling working positions and tibiofemoral knee OA but not of patellofemoral knee OA.
There is an increased risk of developing MRI-detected medial meniscal tears and periarticular bursitis among floor layers compared with referents, but it is not associated to long duration of employment.
The study suggests that other knee disorders than osteoarthritis may explain that floor layers have knee complaints.
Strengths and limitations of the study
Study strength includes investigation with both radiographic and MRI, the description of a variety of knee disorders and the long duration of exposure among study group.
Limitation is the small number of participants due to economic reasons by conducting MRI.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001109
PMCID: PMC3364450  PMID: 22619269
3.  Occupational and leisure time physical activity: risk of all-cause mortality and myocardial infarction in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. A prospective cohort study 
BMJ Open  2012;2(1):e000556.
Objectives
Men with low physical fitness and high occupational physical activity are recently shown to have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The association between occupational physical activity with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality may also depend on leisure time physical activity.
Design
A prospective cohort study.
Setting
The Copenhagen City Heart Study.
Participants
7819 men and women aged 25–66 years without a history of cardiovascular disease who attended an initial examination in the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1976–1978.
Outcome measures
Myocardial infarction and all-cause mortality. Occupational physical activity was defined by combining information from baseline (1976–1978) with reassessment in 1981–1983. Conventional risk factors were controlled for in Cox analyses.
Results
During the follow-up from 1976 to 1978 until 2010, 2888 subjects died of all-cause mortality and 787 had a first event of myocardial infarction. Overall, occupational physical activity predicted all-cause mortality and myocardial infarction in men but not in women (test for interaction p=0.02). High occupational physical activity was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality among men with low (HR 1.56; 95% CI 1.11 to 2.18) and moderate (HR 1.31; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.63) leisure time physical activity but not among men with high leisure time physical activity (HR 1.00; 95% CI 0.78 to 1.26) (test for interaction p=0.04). Similar but weaker tendencies were found for myocardial infarction. Among women, occupational physical activity was not associated with subsequent all-cause mortality or myocardial infarction.
Conclusions
The findings suggest that high occupational physical activity imposes harmful effects particularly among men with low levels of leisure time physical activity.
Article summary
Article focus
Men with low physical fitness and high occupational physical activity are recently shown to have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality.
It is unknown if the association between occupational physical activity with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality also depends on leisure time physical activity.
Key messages
This study shows that men with high occupational physical activity have an increased risk of all-cause mortality.
Leisure time physical activity was found to modify the positive association between occupational physical activity and risk of all-cause mortality. High occupational physical activity imposes harmful effects particularly among men with low levels of leisure time physical activity.
Strengths and limitations of this study
Study strengths include the long follow-up time, repeated assessment of the occupational physical activity, objective measures of several covariates from clinical examinations, information on outcomes obtained from valid registers, and participation of both sexes. Some limitations are the lack of control for psychosocial work factors and the self-reported exposures.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000556
PMCID: PMC3282285  PMID: 22331387

Results 1-3 (3)