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1.  Respectful encounters and return to work: empirical study of long-term sick-listed patients' experiences of Swedish healthcare 
BMJ Open  2011;1(2):e000246.
Aims
To study long-term sick-listed patients' self-estimated ability to return to work after experiences of healthcare encounters that made them feel either respected or wronged.
Methods
A cross-sectional and questionnaire-based survey was used to study a sample of long-term sick-listed patients (n=5802 respondents). The survey included questions about positive and negative encounters as well as reactions to these encounters, such as ‘feeling respected’ and ‘feeling wronged’. The questionnaire also included questions about the effects of these encounters on the patients' ability to return to work.
Results
Among patients who had experienced positive encounters, those who also felt respected (n=3327) demonstrated significantly improved self-estimated ability to return to work compared to those who did not feel respected (n=79) (62% (95% CI 60% to 64%) vs 34% (95% CI 28% to 40%)). Among patients with experiences of negative encounters, those who in addition felt wronged (n=993) claimed to be significantly more impeded from returning to work compared to those who did not feel wronged (n=410) (50% (95% CI 47% to 53%) vs 31% (95% CI 27% to 35%)).
Conclusions
The study indicates that positive encounters in healthcare combined with feeling respected significantly facilitate sickness absentees' self-estimated ability to return to work, while negative encounters combined with feeling wronged significantly impair it.
Article summary
Article focus
To what extent can positive and perceived respectful healthcare encounters influence long-term sick-listed patients' ability to return to work?
To what extent can negative and perceived unfair healthcare encounters influence long-term sick-listed patients' ability to return to work?
Key messages
Long-term sick-listed patients' self-estimated ability to return to work is significantly facilitated if healthcare encounters are perceived as respectful.
Long-term sick-listed patients' self-estimated ability to return to work is significantly impeded if healthcare encounters are perceived as unfair.
The net effect of feeling respected was highest among patients with somatic disorders, while the net effect of feeling wronged was highest among patients with psychiatric disorders.
Strengths and limitation of this study
The study sample was large and we obtained quite a high response rate.
The outcome measure was the respondents' self-estimated ability to return to work, not their actual ability.
The findings are based on the views of long-term sick-listed patients and so generalisation may not be possible.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000246
PMCID: PMC3211048  PMID: 22021890

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