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1.  Public acceptability of financial incentives for smoking cessation in pregnancy and breast feeding: a survey of the British public 
BMJ Open  2014;4(7):e005524.
Objective
To survey public attitudes about incentives for smoking cessation in pregnancy and for breast feeding to inform trial design.
Design
Cross-sectional survey.
Setting and participants
British general public.
Methods
Seven promising incentive strategies had been identified from evidence syntheses and qualitative interview data from service users and providers. These were shopping vouchers for: (1) validated smoking cessation in pregnancy and (2) after birth; (3) for a smoke-free home; (4) for proven breast feeding; (5) a free breast pump; (6) payments to health services for reaching smoking cessation in pregnancy targets and (7) breastfeeding targets. Ipsos MORI used area quota sampling and home-administered computer-assisted questionnaires, with randomised question order to assess agreement with different incentives (measured on a five-point scale). Demographic data and target behaviour experience were recorded. Analysis used multivariable ordered logit models.
Results
Agreement with incentives was mixed (ranging from 34% to 46%) among a representative sample of 1144 British adults. Mean agreement score was highest for a free breast pump, and lowest for incentives for smoking abstinence after birth. More women disagreed with shopping vouchers than men. Those with lower levels of education disagreed more with smoking cessation incentives and a breast pump. Those aged 44 or under agreed more with all incentive strategies compared with those aged 65 and over, particularly provider targets for smoking cessation. Non-white ethnic groups agreed particularly with breastfeeding incentives. Current smokers with previous stop attempts and respondents who had breast fed children agreed with providing vouchers for the respective behaviours. Up to £40/month vouchers for behaviour change were acceptable (>85%).
Conclusions
Women and the less educated were more likely to disagree, but men and women of childbearing age to agree, with incentives designed for their benefit. Trials evaluating reach, impact on health inequalities and ethnic groups are required prior to implementing incentive interventions.
Trial registration number
CRD42012001980.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005524
PMCID: PMC4120368  PMID: 25037645
Preventive Medicine; PUblic Health; Social Medicine
2.  Process evaluation for the FEeding Support Team (FEST) randomised controlled feasibility trial of proactive and reactive telephone support for breastfeeding women living in disadvantaged areas 
BMJ Open  2012;2(2):e001039.
Objective
To assess the feasibility, acceptability and fidelity of a feeding team intervention with an embedded randomised controlled trial of team-initiated (proactive) and woman-initiated (reactive) telephone support after hospital discharge.
Design
Participatory approach to the design and implementation of a pilot trial embedded within a before-and-after study, with mixed-method process evaluation.
Setting
A postnatal ward in Scotland.
Sample
Women initiating breast feeding and living in disadvantaged areas.
Methods
Quantitative data: telephone call log and workload diaries. Qualitative data: interviews with women (n=40) with follow-up (n=11) and staff (n=17); ward observations 2 weeks before and after the intervention; recorded telephone calls (n=16) and steering group meetings (n=9); trial case notes (n=69); open question in a telephone interview (n=372). The Framework approach to analysis was applied to mixed-method data.
Main outcome measures
Quantitative: telephone call characteristics (number, frequency, duration); workload activity. Qualitative: experiences and perspectives of women and staff.
Results
A median of eight proactive calls per woman (n=35) with a median duration of 5 min occurred in the 14 days following hospital discharge. Only one of 34 control women initiated a call to the feeding team, with women undervaluing their own needs compared to others, and breast feeding as a reason to call. Proactive calls providing continuity of care increased women's confidence and were highly valued. Data demonstrated intervention fidelity for woman-centred care; however, observing an entire breast feed was not well implemented due to short hospital stays, ward routines and staff–team–woman communication issues. Staff pragmatically recognised that dedicated feeding teams help meet women's breastfeeding support needs in the context of overstretched and variable postnatal services.
Conclusions
Implementing and integrating the FEeding Support Team (FEST) trial within routine postnatal care was feasible and acceptable to women and staff from a research and practice perspective and shows promise for addressing health inequalities.
Trial registration
ISRCTN27207603. The study protocol and final report is available on request.
Article summary
Article focus
To use a participatory approach to design, deliver and implement a feeding support team intervention integrated into routine postnatal ward care and to deliver a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) of proactive and reactive telephone support for breast feeding for up to 14 days after hospital discharge for women living in more disadvantaged areas.
To use a mixed qualitative and quantitative methods process evaluation to assess the study acceptability, feasibility and intervention fidelity from the perspectives of women and National Health Service staff.
To inform the design of a future definitive RCT.
Key messages
Women living in disadvantaged areas are unlikely to initiate calls for help with breast feeding and proactive telephone calls may help to counteract the inverse care law.
Women undervalue both breast feeding and their own needs compared with the needs of others as a reason to ask for help in the context of overstretched maternity services.
A caring, reassuring woman-centred communication style with continuity of care from hospital to home was valued and increased women's confidence.
Strengths and limitations of this study
The participatory approach embedding a rigorous RCT within a before-and-after cohort study with mixed-methods data to evaluate implementation processes and costs are strengths that will enable us to design a feasible and acceptable definitive trial.
The contribution of the personal characteristics and skills of the feeding team to the intervention was important and may be challenging to replicate.
The low number of women who reported having an entire breast feed observed is a limitation and warrants further investigation.
More research is required before feeding teams and proactive calls are widely implemented as there are likely to be unintended consequences to such an organisational change in postnatal care.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001039
PMCID: PMC3341595  PMID: 22535794
3.  The FEeding Support Team (FEST) randomised, controlled feasibility trial of proactive and reactive telephone support for breastfeeding women living in disadvantaged areas 
BMJ Open  2012;2(2):e000652.
Objective
To assess the feasibility of implementing a dedicated feeding support team on a postnatal ward and pilot the potential effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of team (proactive) and woman-initiated (reactive) telephone support after discharge.
Design
Randomised controlled trial embedded within a before-and-after study. Participatory approach and mixed-method process evaluation.
Setting
A postnatal ward in Scotland.
Sample
Women living in disadvantaged areas initiating breast feeding.
Methods
Eligible women were recruited to a before-and-after intervention study, a proportion of whom were independently randomised after hospital discharge to intervention: daily proactive and reactive telephone calls for ≤14 days or control: reactive telephone calls ≤ day 14. Intention-to-treat analysis compared the randomised groups on cases with complete outcomes at follow-up.
Main outcome measures
Primary outcome: any breast feeding at 6–8 weeks assessed by a telephone call from a researcher blind to group allocation. Secondary outcomes: exclusive breast feeding, satisfaction with care, NHS costs and cost per additional woman breast feeding.
Results
There was no difference in feeding outcomes for women initiating breast feeding before the intervention (n=413) and after (n=388). 69 women were randomised to telephone support: 35 intervention (32 complete cases) and 34 control (26 complete cases). 22 intervention women compared with 12 control women were giving their baby some breast milk (RR 1.49, 95% CI 0.92 to 2.40) and 17 intervention women compared with eight control women were exclusively breast feeding (RR 1.73, 95% CI 0.88 to 3.37) at 6–8 weeks after birth. The incremental cost of providing proactive calls was £87 per additional woman breast feeding and £91 per additional woman exclusively breast feeding at 6–8 weeks; costs were sensitive to service organisation.
Conclusions
Proactive telephone care delivered by a dedicated feeding team shows promise as a cost-effective intervention for improving breastfeeding outcomes. Integrating the FEeding Support Team (FEST) intervention into routine postnatal care was feasible.
Trial registration number
ISRCTN27207603. The study protocol and final report are available on request.
Article summary
Article focus
To pilot the potential effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of continuing proactive and reactive telephone support for breast feeding for up to 14 days after hospital discharge for women living in more disadvantaged areas.
To assess the feasibility of implementing a dedicated feeding team on a postnatal ward.
To design an effective health service intervention for infant feeding by re-organising how routine care is provided to inform a larger programme of research.
Key messages
Proactive telephone care delivered by a dedicated feeding team shows promise for increasing breastfeeding rates 6–8 weeks after birth.
Only having a dedicated feeding team on a postnatal ward did not appear to make any difference to feeding outcomes at 6–8 weeks after birth.
We have demonstrated the feasibility of (1) implementing the FEeding Support Team intervention as part of routine postnatal care and (2) the recruitment and data collection processes for a proposed definitive trial.
Strengths and limitations of this study
Using a participatory approach and embedding a rigorous randomised control trial within a before-and-after cohort study with mixed methods data to evaluate costs are strengths that will enable us to design a definitive trial.
It is likely that the effect sizes are overestimated as the sample size was small and no sample size calculation was performed prior to the study.
Our sample included women requiring longer hospital stays due to birth complications.
The reactive call service was only free to those who had the same mobile phone network provider.
The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios presented represent the most favourable set of assumptions for proactive telephone support and are sensitive to how the service is organised.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000652
PMCID: PMC3341594  PMID: 22535790
4.  A serial qualitative interview study of infant feeding experiences: idealism meets realism 
BMJ Open  2012;2(2):e000504.
Objective
To investigate the infant feeding experiences of women and their significant others from pregnancy until 6 months after birth to establish what would make a difference.
Design
Qualitative serial interview study.
Setting
Two health boards in Scotland.
Participants
72 of 541 invited pregnant women volunteered. 220 interviews approximately every 4 weeks with 36 women, 26 partners, eight maternal mothers, one sister and two health professionals took place.
Results
The overarching theme was a clash between overt or covert infant feeding idealism and the reality experienced. This is manifest as pivotal points where families perceive that the only solution that will restore family well-being is to stop breast feeding or introduce solids. Immediate family well-being is the overriding goal rather than theoretical longer term health benefits. Feeding education is perceived as unrealistic, overly technical and rules based which can undermine women's confidence. Unanimously families would prefer the balance to shift away from antenatal theory towards more help immediately after birth and at 3–4 months when solids are being considered. Family-orientated interactive discussions are valued above breastfeeding-centred checklist style encounters.
Conclusions
Adopting idealistic global policy goals like exclusive breast feeding until 6 months as individual goals for women is unhelpful. More achievable incremental goals are recommended. Using a proactive family-centred narrative approach to feeding care might enable pivotal points to be anticipated and resolved. More attention to the diverse values, meanings and emotions around infant feeding within families could help to reconcile health ideals with reality.
Article summary
Article focus
To investigate the perspectives of women and their wider family and social network on infant feeding from pregnancy until 6 months after birth.
To ascertain what would make a difference to their experiences of breast feeding and the introduction of other fluids and solids.
To focus on health inequalities and to understand interactions between women, professionals, organisations and systems to inform policy, practice and the design of complex intervention trials to improve infant feeding outcomes.
Key messages
Clashes between overt or covert idealism and realism within and between families and the health service occur at pivotal points particularly in the early weeks after birth and around the introduction of solids.
At pivotal points, families often perceive the only solution within their control that will restore family well-being is to stop breast feeding or introduce solids or other fluids. Using a family-centred narrative approach could enable pivotal points to be anticipated and resolved.
Translating global policy goals like exclusive breast feeding until 6 months into practice is unhelpful and achievable incremental goal setting is recommended.
Strengths and limitations of this study
Original interpretation using robust and transparent methods in a relatively large data set of serial interviews about infant feeding, with recruitment of women living in more disadvantaged areas.
Findings which are relevant to current policy and practice, particularly the Unicef Baby Friendly initiative.
An explicit aim to elicit the views of women and their significant others to inform future intervention studies, policy and practice.
Our findings are hypothesis generating rather than hypothesis testing.
It is uncertain how transferable our data is outside the UK context, particularly to countries where breast feeding prevalence is high.
Although we targeted more disadvantaged areas for recruitment, our sample was more economically advantaged than we would have liked.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2011-000504
PMCID: PMC3307036  PMID: 22422915

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