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Journals
Year of Publication
1.  Reflections on a tsuba 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1598.
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PMCID: PMC2359109
2.  Sloth. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1596.
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PMCID: PMC2359106  PMID: 8991000
3.  Envy. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1592-1593.
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PMCID: PMC2359102  PMID: 8990996
4.  Cover story 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1591.
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PMCID: PMC2359100
5.  And God will fill the bullet holes with candy. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1585-1587.
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PMCID: PMC2359098  PMID: 9011287
6.  Falling back on charity. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1566.
PMCID: PMC2359086  PMID: 8990982
8.  Don't leave a mess, call Triple S! 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1603-1605.
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PMCID: PMC2359112  PMID: 9011289
9.  Narcosis and nightshade. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1630-1632.
Although this year marks the 150th anniversary of the discovery of modern surgical anaesthesia, surgery itself has a much longer history. It is well known that extracts from the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, were used to dull the pain of surgery during ancient times but less well known that extracts from plants with sedative powers often accompanied them, producing primitive anaesthesia. Most of these sedative plants were members of a large botanical family, the Solanaceae. This paper describes some of them and discusses the ways in which they were administered. It also explains why, during the middle ages, these primitive techniques went out of use but how none the less they provided Shakespeare with the inspiration for some of his greatest plays. When the active principal of the Solanaceae was identified as scopolamine, it came to play a part in 20th century anaesthesia. The combination of omnopon and scopolamine lives on as a premedication, and the presence of poppy heads and mandrake roots on the arms of today's Association of Anaesthetists serves to remind us of the speciality's links with its past.
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PMCID: PMC2359130  PMID: 8991015
10.  Promoting attachment, providing memories. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1615.
PMCID: PMC2359121  PMID: 8991007
11.  Egil's or Paget's disease? 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1613-1614.
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PMCID: PMC2359120  PMID: 8991006
12.  Commentaries 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1612.
PMCID: PMC2359119
13.  Commentaries 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1612.
PMCID: PMC2359118
14.  Commentaries 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1611-1612.
PMCID: PMC2359117
15.  Commentaries 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1611.
PMCID: PMC2359116
16.  Rowlandson's Death in the Nursery. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1605.
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PMCID: PMC2359113  PMID: 9011290
17.  Oh, for a little humanity. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1601-1603.
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PMCID: PMC2359111  PMID: 9011288
18.  Bears, academia, and anaesthesia: a controlled study. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1643-1644.
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PMCID: PMC2359135  PMID: 9011292
19.  Poignant medicines 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1656.
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PMCID: PMC2359148
21.  Minerva 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1653.
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PMCID: PMC2359139
22.  Is this what we really want? 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1643.
PMCID: PMC2359134  PMID: 9011291
23.  A training culture in surgery. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1635-1639.
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PMCID: PMC2359132  PMID: 8991016
24.  A trio of treasurers 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  1996;313(7072):1633.
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PMCID: PMC2359131

Results 1-25 (2933)