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1.  Should disadvantaged people be paid to take care of their health? Yes. 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;337(7662):140.
Many countries are turning to cash incentives to encourage people to look after their health. Richard Cookson argues that such schemes can save money in the long run, but Jennie Popay (doi: 10.1136/bmj.a594) believes the problems need a deeper solution
doi:10.1136/bmj.a589
PMCID: PMC2483903  PMID: 18614508
2.  Should disadvantaged people be paid to take care of their health? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;337(7662):141.
Many countries are turning to cash incentives to encourage people to look after their health. Richard Cookson (doi: 10.1136/bmj.a589) argues that such schemes can save money in the long run, but Jennie Popay believes the problems need a deeper solution
doi:10.1136/bmj.a594
PMCID: PMC2483905  PMID: 18614509
3.  Should geriatric medicine remain a specialty? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;337(7661):78.
The development of geriatricshas greatly improved care for older people. Leon Flicker believesspecialist care remains important for this vulnerable group,butC P Denaro and A Mudge (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39533.696076.AD) argue that age divisions are no longer relevant
doi:10.1136/bmj.39538.481273.AD
PMCID: PMC2453251  PMID: 18595935
4.  Should geriatric medicine remain a specialty? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;337(7661):79.
The development of geriatricshas greatly improved care for older people. Leon Flicker (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39538.481273.AD) believesspecialist care remains important for this vulnerable group,butC P Denaro and A Mudge argue that age divisions are no longer relevant
doi:10.1136/bmj.39533.696076.AD
PMCID: PMC2453252  PMID: 18595934
5.  Are international medical conferences an outdated luxury the planet can’t afford? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7659):1466.
Every year thousands of doctors and scientists fly to meetings at distant locations. Malcolm Green argues that this is no longer justifiable or necessary, but James Drife (doi: 10.1136/bmj.a351)believes face to face contact is hard to replace
doi:10.1136/bmj.a358
PMCID: PMC2440857  PMID: 18583676
6.  Are international medical conferences an outdated luxury the planet can’t afford? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7659):1467.
Every year thousands of doctors and scientists fly to meetings at distant locations. Malcolm Green (doi: 10.1136/bmj.a358) argues that this is no longer justifiable or necessary, but James Drife believes face to face contact is hard to replace
doi:10.1136/bmj.a351
PMCID: PMC2440858  PMID: 18583677
7.  Should the drug industry work with key opinion leaders? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7658):1404.
Industry commonly works with experts to put across its message. Charlie Buckwell believes that such interaction is essential for medical advancement, but Giovanni Fava (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39541.731493.59) argues that it risks scientific integrity
doi:10.1136/bmj.39541.702870.59
PMCID: PMC2432129  PMID: 18566075
8.  Should the drug industry work with key opinion leaders? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7658):1405.
Industry commonly works with experts to put across its message. Charlie Buckwell (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39541.702870.59) believes that such interaction is essential for medical advancement, but Giovanni Fava argues that it risks scientific integrity
doi:10.1136/bmj.39541.731493.59
PMCID: PMC2432130  PMID: 18566076
9.  Should we pay donors to increase the supply of organs for transplantation? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7657):1343.
Paymentfor livingkidney donation is illegal in most countries. Arthur Matas (doi: 10.1136/bmj.a157) believes that legalisation is needed to shorten waiting times, but Jeremy Chapman argues that it will reduce the supply of all organs
doi:10.1136/bmj.a179
PMCID: PMC2427080  PMID: 18556314
10.  Should we pay donors to increase the supply of organs for transplantation? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7657):1342.
Paymentfor livingkidney donation is illegal in most countries. Arthur Matas believes that legalisation is needed to shorten waiting times, but Jeremy Chapman (doi: 10.1136/bmj.a179) argues that it will reduce the supply of all organs
doi:10.1136/bmj.a157
PMCID: PMC2427086  PMID: 18556313
11.  Should we use large scale healthcare interventions without clear evidence that benefits outweigh costs and harms? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7656):1276.
Obtaining definitive evidence on the effects of large scale interventions can be difficult. Bernard Crump believes that implementation with careful monitoring is justified but Seth Landefeld and colleagues (doi: 10.1136/bmj.a144) argue that acting without proof of net benefit is both costly and potentially damaging to health
doi:10.1136/bmj.a145
PMCID: PMC2413344  PMID: 18535068
12.  Should we use large scale healthcare interventions without clear evidence that benefits outweigh costs and harms? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7656):1277.
Obtaining definitive evidence on the effects of large scale interventions can be difficult. Bernard Crump (doi: 10.1136/bmj.a145) believes that implementation with careful monitoring is justified but Seth Landefeld and colleagues argue that acting without proof is both costly and potentially damaging to health
doi:10.1136/bmj.a144
PMCID: PMC2413345  PMID: 18535069
13.  Will polyclinics deliver real benefits for patients? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7654):1164.
Government proposalstoestablish polyclinics are intended to reshape NHS services. Michael Dixon believes they will deliver more patient centred care, but Stewart Kay (doi: 10.1136/bmj.a130)thinks they are an unnecessary change
doi:10.1136/bmj.39577.488507.AD
PMCID: PMC2394592  PMID: 18497413
14.  Will polyclinics deliver real benefits for patients? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7654):1165.
Government proposalstoestablish polyclinics are intended to reshape NHS services. Michael Dixon (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39577.488507.AD) believes they will deliver more patient centred care, but Stewart Kay thinks they are an unnecessary change
doi:10.1136/bmj.a130
PMCID: PMC2394593  PMID: 18497414
15.  Should patients be able to pay top-up fees to receive the treatment they want? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7653):1104.
Decisions not to fund some treatments under the NHS have been vigorously contested. James Gubb argues that patients should be able to buy such treatments privately, but Karen Bloor (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39563.493218.AD)believes this will undermine the whole health system
doi:10.1136/bmj.39563.453183.AD
PMCID: PMC2386634  PMID: 18460556
16.  Should patients be able to pay top-up fees to receive the treatment they want? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7653):1105.
Decisions not to fund some treatments under the NHS have been vigorously contested. James Gubb (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39563.453183.AD) argues that patients should be able to buy such treatments privately, but Karen Bloor believes this will undermine the whole health system
doi:10.1136/bmj.39563.493218.AD
PMCID: PMC2386643  PMID: 18460555
17.  Does it matter that medical graduates don’t get jobs as doctors? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7651):990.
Last year’s shortfall in training places looks set to be repeated. Graham Winyard believes this is a betrayal of students’ expectations, but Alan Maynard (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39555.500613.AD) thinks it is inevitable if patients are to get the best care
doi:10.1136/bmj.39555.457060.AD
PMCID: PMC2364816  PMID: 18456628
18.  Does it matter that medical graduates don’t get jobs as doctors? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7651):991.
Last year’s shortfall in training places looks set to be repeated. Graham Winyard (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39555.457060.AD) believes this is a betrayal of students’ expectations, but Alan Maynard thinks it is inevitable if patients are to get the best care
doi:10.1136/bmj.39555.500613.AD
PMCID: PMC2364817  PMID: 18456629
19.  Should we screen for aortic aneurysm? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7649):863.
In January, the government announced pilot screening programmes for men aged 65 in England, with national screening to follow. Stephen Brearley (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39517.443796.AD) describes the rationale for this proposal while James Johnson argues that it is not without pitfalls
doi:10.1136/bmj.39514.494167.AD
PMCID: PMC2323076  PMID: 18420692
20.  Should we screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7649):862.
In January, the government announced five pilot screening programmes for aortic aneurysm in men aged 65 in England. Stephen Brearley describes the rationale for this proposal while James Johnson (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39514.494167.AD) argues that it is not without pitfalls
doi:10.1136/bmj.39517.443796.AD
PMCID: PMC2323088  PMID: 18420691
21.  Are there too many female medical graduates? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7647):749.
UK universities are now producing more female doctors than male. Brian McKinstry (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39505.491065.94) argues we are risking future staffing problems, but Jane Dacre thinks there is still some way to go before we reach true equality
doi:10.1136/bmj.39505.566701.94
PMCID: PMC2287237  PMID: 18390525
22.  Are there too many female medical graduates? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7647):748.
UK universities are now producing more female doctors than male. Brian McKinstry argues we are risking future staffing problems, but Jane Dacre (doi: 10.1136/bmj.39505.566701.94) thinks there is still some way to go before we reach true equality
doi:10.1136/bmj.39505.491065.94
PMCID: PMC2287266  PMID: 18390524
23.  Should we dump the metabolic syndrome?: Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7645):640.
The number of people with the metabolic syndrome is rising alongside obesity. Nevertheless, Edwin Gale believes the diagnosis has little practical value. George Alberti and P Z Zimmet, however, think it increases the detection of people at high risk of diabetes and heart disease
doi:10.1136/bmj.39477.500197.AD
PMCID: PMC2270943  PMID: 18356231
24.  Should we dump the metabolic syndrome? No 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7645):641.
The number of people with the metabolic syndrome is rising alongside obesity. Nevertheless, Edwin Gale believes the diagnosis has little practical value. George Alberti and P Z Zimmet, however, think it increases the detection of people at high risk of diabetes and heart disease
doi:10.1136/bmj.39484.636586.94
PMCID: PMC2270945  PMID: 18356232
25.  Has the hunt for conflicts of interest gone too far? Yes 
BMJ : British Medical Journal  2008;336(7642):476.
Thomas Stossel argues that restrictions on doctors’ and academics’ interaction with commercial companies are damaging research, but Kirby Lee believes it is a price worth paying to maintain public trust
doi:10.1136/bmj.39493.489213.AD
PMCID: PMC2258346  PMID: 18309999

Results 1-25 (102)