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1.  Toe spreading ability in men with chronic pelvic pain syndrome 
BMC Urology  2005;5:11.
Background
We examined toe-spreading ability in subjects with chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) to test the hypothesis that subjects with CPPS could have deficiencies in lower extremity functions innervated by sacral spinal roots.
Methods
Seventy two subjects with CPPS and 98 volunteer controls were examined as part of a larger study on CPPS. All the subjects underwent a detailed urologic and neurological examination including a toe-spreading examination with a quantitative scoring system. We compared the groups in terms of ability of toe-spreading as either "complete" (all toes spreading) or "incomplete" (at least one interdigital space not spreading) and also by comparing the number of interdigital spaces. For CPPS subjects only, we also analyzed the variation of the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) scales by toe-spreading categories.
Results
CPPS subjects were less often able to spread all toes than subjects without CPPS (p = 0.005). None of the NIH-CPSI sub-scales (pain, urinary symptoms, and quality of life), nor the total score showed an association with toe spreading ability.
Conclusion
We found toe spreading to be diminished in subjects with CPPS. We hypothesize that incomplete toe spreading in subjects with CPPS may be related to subtle deficits involving the most caudal part of the spinal segments.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-5-11
PMCID: PMC1177972  PMID: 15949041
2.  Single session endoscopic management of intrinsic ureteropelvic junction obstruction and concomitant renal stone disease in a child: a case report 
BMC Urology  2002;2:11.
Background
Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a well known therapeutic modality for stone diseases of childhood. Antegrade and retrograde endopyelotomies are also well defined options of treatment for secondary ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Yet there are few reports regarding endoscopic therapy of intrinsic ureteropelvic junction obstruction. To our knowledge, there exist only a few reports of endosurgical treatment of children with stone disease and with concomitant intrinsic ureteropelvic junction obstruction, in the literature.
Case presentation
We present the endoscopic management of stone disease and concomitant intrinsic ureteropelvic junction obstruction of a child in one session.
Conclusion
Percutaneous nephrolithotomy and antegrade endopyelotomy is combined safely with successful outcome in a child.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-2-11
PMCID: PMC130023  PMID: 12296974
3.  Primary renal carcinoid natural history of the disease for ten years: case report 
BMC Urology  2002;2:1.
Background
Primary renal carcinoid is extremely rare and there are few reports on the natural history of the disease.
Case presentation
A 68-year-old male with a right renal mass who lost to follow-up for ten years has been presented. His only complaint was a mild flank pain. Upon admission to the hospital for his renal mass, he underwent a right radical nephrectomy and pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of primary renal carcinoid.
Conclusions
In light of the presented case, primary renal carcinoma may have a prolonged natural history with no distant metastasis and any change in the quality of life of the patient.
PMCID: PMC65042  PMID: 11818030
4.  Evrim Bougie: A new instrument in the management of urethral strictures 
BMC Urology  2001;1:1.
Background
In this study a new instrument and technique is described for the endoscopic treatment of complete posterior urethral strictures, which may result in serious complications and sometimes require troublesome treatments.
Methods
Three patients with complete posterior urethral obstruction were treated endoscopically with the guidance of a new instrument: Evrim Bougie. Evrim Bougie looks like a Guyon Bougie, has a curved end, which facilitates getting into the bladder through the cystostomy tract and with a built in channel of 1.5 mm in diameter for a sliding needle exiting at its tip. Having confirmed fluoroscopically and endoscopically that the sliding needle had passed across the strictured segment, the strictured segment was incised with internal urethrotomy, distal to the strictured segment, and urethral continuity was accomplished. At the end of the operation a Foley urethral catheter was easily placed into the bladder per urethra. Patients were instructed in self-catheterization after removal of the urethral catheter. All patients achieved normal voiding at postoperative 7th month follow-up evaluation.
Conclusion
Internal urethrotomy could be performed under the guidance of the sliding needle of Evrim Bougie advanced from above the posterior urethral strictures, which to our knowledge was described for the first time in the English literature. We also believe that there may be other possible indications of Evrim Bougie for different procedures in urethral surgery.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-1-1
PMCID: PMC55335  PMID: 11545678

Results 1-4 (4)