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1.  Single session endoscopic management of intrinsic ureteropelvic junction obstruction and concomitant renal stone disease in a child: a case report 
BMC Urology  2002;2:11.
Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a well known therapeutic modality for stone diseases of childhood. Antegrade and retrograde endopyelotomies are also well defined options of treatment for secondary ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Yet there are few reports regarding endoscopic therapy of intrinsic ureteropelvic junction obstruction. To our knowledge, there exist only a few reports of endosurgical treatment of children with stone disease and with concomitant intrinsic ureteropelvic junction obstruction, in the literature.
Case presentation
We present the endoscopic management of stone disease and concomitant intrinsic ureteropelvic junction obstruction of a child in one session.
Percutaneous nephrolithotomy and antegrade endopyelotomy is combined safely with successful outcome in a child.
PMCID: PMC130023  PMID: 12296974
2.  Severe renal bleeding caused by a ruptured renal sheath: case report of a rare complication of percutaneous nephrolithotomy 
BMC Urology  2002;2:10.
Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a minimally invasive intervention for renal stone disease. Complications, which are rare and usually presented as case reports, are diversified as the utilization of the procedure is expanded. The procedure causes less blood loss and less morbidity when compared to open surgical procedures. Yet, there are some reports involving severe bleeding and relevant morbidity during surgery. These are usually related with the surgical technique or experience of the surgeon.
Renal sheaths are designed to cause minimal trauma inside the kidney and, to our knowledge, there are no reports presenting the rupture of a sheath causing severe bleeding during the procedure.
Case report
We present an adult patient who had severe bleeding during percutaneous nephrolithotomy due to parenchymal injury caused by a ruptured renal sheath. During retrieval, due probably to rough handling of the equipment, a piece of stone with serrated edges ruptured the tip of the sheath, and this tip caused damage inside the kidney. The operation was terminated and measures were taken to control bleeding. The patient was transfused with a total of 1600 ml of blood, and the stones were cleared in a second look operation.
Although considered to be a minimally invasive procedure, some unexpected complications may arise during percutaneous nephrolithotomy. After being fragmanted, stone pieces may damage surgical equipment, causing acute and severe harm to the kidney. Surgeons must manipulate the equipment with fine and careful movements in order to prevent this situation.
PMCID: PMC128810  PMID: 12236904
3.  Primary renal carcinoid natural history of the disease for ten years: case report 
BMC Urology  2002;2:1.
Primary renal carcinoid is extremely rare and there are few reports on the natural history of the disease.
Case presentation
A 68-year-old male with a right renal mass who lost to follow-up for ten years has been presented. His only complaint was a mild flank pain. Upon admission to the hospital for his renal mass, he underwent a right radical nephrectomy and pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of primary renal carcinoid.
In light of the presented case, primary renal carcinoma may have a prolonged natural history with no distant metastasis and any change in the quality of life of the patient.
PMCID: PMC65042  PMID: 11818030

Results 1-3 (3)