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1.  Prediction of clinical manifestations of transurethral resection syndrome by preoperative ultrasonographic estimation of prostate weight 
BMC Urology  2014;14:67.
Background
This study aimed to investigate the relationship between preoperative estimated prostate weight on ultrasonography and clinical manifestations of transurethral resection (TUR) syndrome.
Methods
The records of patients who underwent TUR of the prostate under regional anesthesia over a 6-year period were retrospectively reviewed. TUR syndrome is usually defined as a serum sodium level of < 125 mmol/l combined with clinical cardiovascular or neurological manifestations. This study focused on the clinical manifestations only, and recorded specific central nervous system and cardiovascular abnormalities according to the checklist proposed by Hahn. Patients with and without clinical manifestations of TUR syndrome were compared to determine the factors associated with TUR syndrome. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the optimal cutoff value of estimated prostate weight for the prediction of clinical manifestations of TUR syndrome.
Results
This study included 167 patients, of which 42 developed clinical manifestations of TUR syndrome. There were significant differences in preoperative estimated prostate weight, operation time, resected prostate weight, intravenous fluid infusion volume, blood transfusion volume, and drainage of the suprapubic irrigation fluid between patients with and without clinical manifestations of TUR syndrome. The preoperative estimated prostate weight was correlated with the resected prostate weight (Spearman’s correlation coefficient, 0.749). Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed that the optimal cutoff value of estimated prostate weight for the prediction of clinical manifestations of TUR syndrome was 75 g (sensitivity, 0.70; specificity, 0.69; area under the curve, 0.73).
Conclusions
Preoperative estimation of prostate weight by ultrasonography can predict the development of clinical manifestations of TUR syndrome. Particular care should be taken when the estimated prostate weight is > 75 g.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-14-67
PMCID: PMC4143887  PMID: 25128188
TUR syndrome; Hyponatremia; Transurethral resection of prostate
2.  Surgical correction of buried penis after traffic accident – a case report 
BMC Urology  2004;4:6.
Background
Buried penis, most commonly seen in children, is particularly debilitating in adults, resulting in inability to void while standing and it also affects vaginal penetration. We report a case of buried penis due to a traffic accident, which caused dislocation of the fractured pubic bone that shifted inside and pulled the penis by its suspensory ligament.
Case presentation
A 55-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of hidden penis while in the sitting position. He had suffered a pelvic fracture in a traffic accident four years previously, and his penis was covered with suprapubic fat when he was in a sitting position. He was unable to have sexual intercourse. We performed a penile lengthening procedure, including inverse V-Y-plasty of the dorsal skin of the penile root, suspensory desmotomy and fat removal, under general anesthesia. There was a good cosmetic result with satisfactory penile erection, which allowed successful sexual intercourse after surgery.
Conculsion
We performed penile elongation surgery with inverse V-Y-plasty of the dorsal skin of the penile root, suspensory desmotomy, and fat removal. Surgical treatment of buried penis achieves marked aesthetic and functional improvement, and benefits the majority of patients, resulting in satisfactory erection and successful sexual intercourse.
doi:10.1186/1471-2490-4-6
PMCID: PMC434514  PMID: 15182380
pelvic fracture; buried penis; V-Yplasty

Results 1-2 (2)