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1.  Oral health in the Japan self-defense forces - a representative survey 
BMC Oral Health  2011;11:14.
The oral health of military populations is usually not very well characterized compared to civilian populations. The aim of this study was to investigate two physical oral health characteristics and one perceived oral health measure and their correlation in the Japan self-defense forces (JSDF).
Number of missing teeth, denture status, and OHRQoL as evaluated by the Japanese 14-item version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-J14) as well as the correlation between these oral health measures was investigated in 911 personnel in the JSDF.
Subjects did not have a substantial number of missing teeth and only 4% used removable dentures. The mean OHIP-J14 score was 4.6 ± 6.7 units. The magnitude of the correlation between the number of missing teeth with OHIP-J14 scores was small (r = 0.22, p < 0.001). Mean OHIP-J14 scores differed between subjects with and without dentures (8.6 and 4.4, p < 0.001).
Compared to Japanese civilian populations, personnel of the JSDF demonstrated good oral health. Two physical oral health characteristics were associated with perceived oral health.
PMCID: PMC3100240  PMID: 21501526
2.  Validating an alternate version of the chewing function questionnaire in partially dentate patients 
BMC Oral Health  2009;9:9.
The aim of this study was to investigate the dimensionality, reliability, and validity of an alternate version of the chewing function questionnaire in partially dentate patients in Japan.
Subjects were partially dentate patients who attended the prosthodontic clinic at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (N = 491, 71% women, mean age (± SD): 63.0 ± 11.5 years). The questionnaire asked each subject to rate his or her ability to chew 20 common Japanese foods. For each individual, responses were combined to yield a chewing function summary score, with higher scores indicating better self-reported chewing ability. We used exploratory factor analysis to investigate the scores' dimensionality. For validity assessment, we computed the correlations between the chewing function score and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL, as measured by the Japanese 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14)) Internal consistency of scores and test-retest reliability were investigated by asking a subset of subjects (N = 62) to complete the questionnaire twice, 2 weeks apart.
Exploratory factor analysis provided some evidence that self-reported chewing ability can be characterized by a summary score as the original authors suggest. Support for the validity of chewing function scores using the alternate version of the questionnaire was derived from correlations with OHIP-14 scores (r = -0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.53 to -0.39); thus, better chewing ability was associated with less impaired OHRQoL. Internal consistency was 'satisfactory,' with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.90 (lower limit of 95% CI: 0.89). The test-retest reliability was 'good,' with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.56 to 0.82).
The alternate version of the chewing function questionnaire can be used as a stand-alone instrument because of the demonstrated reliability and validity of scores obtained using the questionnaire in partially dentate patients.
PMCID: PMC2667387  PMID: 19291293

Results 1-2 (2)