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1.  Outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in Chinese, South Asian and white patients with acute myocardial infarction: administrative data analysis 
Background
Little is known on whether there are ethnic differences in outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABG) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We compared 30-day and long-term mortality, recurrent AMI, and congestive heart failure in South Asian, Chinese and White patients with AMI who underwent PCI and CABG.
Methods
Hospital administrative data in British Columbia (BC), Canada were linked to the BC Cardiac Registry to identify all patients with AMI who underwent PCI (n = 4729) or CABG (n = 1687) (1999–2003). Ethnicity was determined from validated surname algorithms. Logistic regression for 30-day mortality and Cox proportional-hazards models were adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, severity of coronary disease, comorbid conditions, time from AMI to a revascularization procedure and distance to the nearest hospital.
Results
Following PCI, Chinese had higher short-term mortality (Odds Ratio (OR): 2.36, 95% CI: 1.12-5.00; p = 0.02), and South Asians had a higher risk for recurrent AMI (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.08-1.67, p = 0.007) and heart failure (OR 1.81, 95% CI: 1.00-3.29, p = 0.05) compared to White patients. Risk of heart failure was higher in South Asian patients who underwent CABG compared to White patients (OR (95% CI) = 2.06 (0.92-4.61), p = 0.08). There were no significant differences in mortality following CABG between groups.
Conclusions
Chinese and South Asian patients with AMI and PCI or CABG had worse outcomes compared to their White counterparts. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and investigate potential underlying causes.
doi:10.1186/1471-2261-13-121
PMCID: PMC3890497  PMID: 24369071
PCI; CABG; Ethnicity; AMI; Outcomes
2.  Cardiac medication prescribing and adherence after acute myocardial infarction in Chinese and South Asian Canadian patients 
Background
Failure to adhere to cardiac medications after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is associated with increased mortality. Language barriers and preference for traditional medications may predispose certain ethnic groups at high risk for non-adherence. We compared prescribing and adherence to ACE-inhibitors (ACEI), beta-blockers (BB), and statins following AMI among elderly Chinese, South Asian, and Non-Asian patients.
Methods
Retrospective-cohort study of elderly AMI survivors (1995-2002) using administrative data from British Columbia. AMI cases and ethnicity were identified using validated ICD-9/10 coding and surname algorithms, respectively. Medication adherence was assessed using the 'proportion of days covered' (PDC) metric with a PDC ≥ 0.80 indicating optimal adherence. The independent effect of ethnicity on adherence was assessed using multivariable modeling, adjusting for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics.
Results
There were 9926 elderly AMI survivors (258 Chinese, 511 South Asian patients). More Chinese patients were prescribed BBs (79.7% vs. 73.1%, p = 0.04) and more South Asian patients were prescribed statins (73.5% vs. 65.2%, p = 0.001). Both Chinese (Odds Ratio [OR] 0.53; 95%CI, 0.39-0.73; p < 0.0001) and South Asian (OR 0.78; 95%CI, 0.61-0.99; p = 0.04) patients were less adherent to ACEI compared to Non-Asian patients. South Asian patients were more adherent to BBs (OR 1.3; 95%CI, 1.04-1.62; p = 0.02). There was no difference in prescribing of ACEI, nor adherence to statins among the ethnicities.
Conclusion
Despite a higher likelihood of being prescribed evidence-based therapies following AMI, Chinese and South Asian patients were less likely to adhere to ACEI compared to their Non-Asian counterparts.
doi:10.1186/1471-2261-11-56
PMCID: PMC3189887  PMID: 21923931
medication adherence; acute myocardial infarction; ethnicity
3.  Ethnic and sex differences in the incidence of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction: British Columbia, Canada 1995-2002 
Background
As populations in Western countries continue to change in their ethnic composition, there is a need for regular surveillance of diseases that have previously shown some health disparities. Earlier data have already demonstrated high rates of cardiovascular mortality among South Asians and relatively lower rates among people of Chinese descent. The aim of this study was to describe the differences in the incidence of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction (AMI) among the three largest ethnic groups in British Columbia (BC), Canada.
Methods
Using hospital administrative data, we identified all patients with incident AMI in BC between April 1, 1995, and March 31, 2002. Census data from 2001 provided the denominator for the entire BC population. Ethnicity was determined using validated surname analysis and applied to the census and hospital administrative datasets. Direct age standardization was used to compare incidence rates.
Results
A total of 34,848 AMI cases were identified. Among men, South Asians had the highest age standardized rate of AMI hospitalization at 4.97/1000 population/year, followed by Whites at 3.29, and then Chinese at 0.98. Young South Asian men, in particular, showed incidence rates that were double that of young Whites and ten times that of young Chinese men. South Asian women also had the highest age-standardized rate of AMI hospitalization at 2.35/1000 population/year, followed by White women (1.53) and Chinese women (0.49).
Conclusions
South Asians continue to have a higher incidence of hospitalized AMI while incidence rates among Chinese remain low. Ethnic differences are most notable among younger men.
doi:10.1186/1471-2261-10-38
PMCID: PMC2933615  PMID: 20723259
4.  Differences in need for antihypertensive drugs among those aware and unaware of their hypertensive status: a cross sectional survey 
Background
Lack of antihypertensive use among hypertensive individuals is a major public health problem. It remains unclear as to how much of this lack of treatment is because of failure to diagnose hypertension or failure to initiate drug treatment for those with a diagnosis of hypertension. The primary aim of this study was to determine the proportion of those untreated individuals who would be recommended to start drug therapy for control of blood pressure among those aware or unaware of their diagnosis of hypertension.
Methods
The Canadian Heart Health Surveys (1986 – 1992), a national, cross-sectional descriptive survey (n = 23 129), was used to determine the proportion of individuals who were untreated, yet satisfied the 2004 Canadian hypertension guidelines for initiating drug therapy. Patients were divided into subgroups of those aware and unaware of having a diagnosis of hypertension according to self reported awareness from the survey.
Results
Of those with untreated hypertension (= 140/90 mmHg), only 37% were aware of their diagnosis. 74% of untreated individuals aware of their diagnosis of hypertension would require drug therapy, compared to 57% of those who were unaware. Of those >65 years of age, 52% of aware individuals needed drug therapy whereas only 34% of unaware elderly would need drug treatment.
Conclusion
In both unaware and aware subgroups, the majority of patients with untreated hypertension would benefit from antihypertensive drug therapy according to the 2004 Canadian Hypertension recommendations. The proportion of untreated patients that still need drug therapy was higher among those who were aware compared to those who were unaware. This finding suggests that the major gap in hypertension control may be in initiating drug therapy rather than in diagnosing hypertension. Further studies are needed to confirm these results to ultimately help strategize public health efforts in controlling hypertension.
doi:10.1186/1471-2261-5-4
PMCID: PMC548688  PMID: 15691376

Results 1-4 (4)