Search tips
Search criteria

Results 1-2 (2)

Clipboard (0)
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Structural studies of the Enterococcus faecalis SufU [Fe-S] cluster protein 
BMC Biochemistry  2009;10:3.
Iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous and evolutionarily ancient inorganic prosthetic groups, the biosynthesis of which depends on complex protein machineries. Three distinct assembly systems involved in the maturation of cellular Fe-S proteins have been determined, designated the NIF, ISC and SUF systems. Although well described in several organisms, these machineries are poorly understood in Gram-positive bacteria. Within the Firmicutes phylum, the Enterococcus spp. genus have recently assumed importance in clinical microbiology being considered as emerging pathogens for humans, wherein Enterococcus faecalis represents the major species associated with nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phylogenetic analysis in Enterococcus faecalis V583 and a structural and conformational characterisation of it SufU protein.
BLAST searches of the Enterococcus genome revealed a series of genes with sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SUF machinery of [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis, namely sufB, sufC, sufD and SufS. In addition, the E. coli IscU ortholog SufU was found to be the scaffold protein of Enterococcus spp., containing all features considered essential for its biological activity, including conserved amino acid residues involved in substrate and/or co-factor binding (Cys50,76,138 and Asp52) and, phylogenetic analyses showed a close relationship with orthologues from other Gram-positive bacteria. Molecular dynamics for structural determinations and molecular modeling using E. faecalis SufU primary sequence protein over the PDB:1su0 crystallographic model from Streptococcus pyogenes were carried out with a subsequent 50 ns molecular dynamic trajectory. This presented a stable model, showing secondary structure modifications near the active site and conserved cysteine residues. Molecular modeling using Haemophilus influenzae IscU primary sequence over the PDB:1su0 crystal followed by a MD trajectory was performed to analyse differences in the C-terminus region of Gram-positive SufU and Gram-negative orthologous proteins, in which several modifications in secondary structure were observed.
The data describe the identification of the SUF machinery for [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis present in the Firmicutes genome, showing conserved sufB, sufC, sufD and sufS genes and the presence of the sufU gene coding for scaffold protein, instead of sufA; neither sufE nor sufR are present. Primary sequences and structural analysis of the SufU protein demonstrated its structural-like pattern to the scaffold protein IscU nearby on the ISC machinery. E. faecalis SufU molecular modeling showed high flexibility over the active site regions, and demonstrated the existence of a specific region in Firmicutes denoting the Gram positive region (GPR), suggested as a possible candidate for interaction with other factors and/or regulators.
PMCID: PMC2644719  PMID: 19187533
2.  The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2540c DNA sequence encodes a bifunctional chorismate synthase 
BMC Biochemistry  2008;9:13.
The emergence of multi- and extensively-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has created an urgent need for new agents to treat tuberculosis (TB). The enzymes of shikimate pathway are attractive targets to the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential for M. tuberculosis and is absent from humans. Chorismate synthase (CS) is the seventh enzyme of this route and catalyzes the NADH- and FMN-dependent synthesis of chorismate, a precursor of aromatic amino acids, naphthoquinones, menaquinones, and mycobactins. Although the M. tuberculosis Rv2540c (aroF) sequence has been annotated to encode a chorismate synthase, there has been no report on its correct assignment and functional characterization of its protein product.
In the present work, we describe DNA amplification of aroF-encoded CS from M. tuberculosis (MtCS), molecular cloning, protein expression, and purification to homogeneity. N-terminal amino acid sequencing, mass spectrometry and gel filtration chromatography were employed to determine identity, subunit molecular weight and oligomeric state in solution of homogeneous recombinant MtCS. The bifunctionality of MtCS was determined by measurements of both chorismate synthase and NADH:FMN oxidoreductase activities. The flavin reductase activity was characterized, showing the existence of a complex between FMNox and MtCS. FMNox and NADH equilibrium binding was measured. Primary deuterium, solvent and multiple kinetic isotope effects are described and suggest distinct steps for hydride and proton transfers, with the former being more rate-limiting.
This is the first report showing that a bacterial CS is bifunctional. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects show that C4-proS hydrogen is being transferred during the reduction of FMNox by NADH and that hydride transfer contributes significantly to the rate-limiting step of FMN reduction reaction. Solvent kinetic isotope effects and proton inventory results indicate that proton transfer from solvent partially limits the rate of FMN reduction and that a single proton transfer gives rise to the observed solvent isotope effect. Multiple isotope effects suggest a stepwise mechanism for the reduction of FMNox. The results on enzyme kinetics described here provide evidence for the mode of action of MtCS and should thus pave the way for the rational design of antitubercular agents.
PMCID: PMC2386126  PMID: 18445278

Results 1-2 (2)