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1.  Comparative physico-chemical profile of Gunja (Abrus precatorius Linn.) seeds processed through water and Nimbu Swarasa (lemon juice) 
Ayu  2013;34(4):411-416.
Gunja (Abrus precatorius Linn.), known as Indian liquorice, is reputed as one of the world's most deadly but most beautiful seed belonging to the family Fabaceae, characterised under the Upavisha (semi-poisonous drugs) and used extensively in various Ayurvedic formulations with great therapeutic significance. Ayurveda recommended the administration of Gunja only after proper Shodhana (purification procedures) in different media such as Godugdha (cow's milk), Kanji (sour gruel), etc., Apart from the classical methods, some traditional practitioners use Nimbu Swarasa for the Shodhana of Gunja seeds. In this study, an attempt has been made to carry out Shodhana of Gunja seeds using Nimbu Swarasa and water. This study revealed differences in physico-chemical parameters of purified samples, in comparison to raw drugs.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.127725
PMCID: PMC3968706  PMID: 24696580
Abrin; Abrus precatorius; Gunja; Nimbu Swarasa; Shodhana
2.  Phytochemical evaluation of the wild and cultivated varieties of Eranda Mula (Roots of Ricinus communis Linn.) 
Ayu  2013;34(2):200-203.
In Ayurveda, the roots of Eranda (Ricinus communis Linn.) are used in the treatment Amavata (rheumatism), Sotha (inflammation), Katisula (backache), Udararoga (disease of abdomen), Jwara (fever), etc, Due to high demand, root of the cultivated variety is mainly used in place of wild. But, a comparative phytochemical profile of both varieties is not available till date. Considering this, a preliminary study has been done to ensure basic phytochemical profile of both the varieties. Preliminary physicochemical parameters, phytochemical screening, quantitative estimation of alkaloid, high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), and heavy metal analysis were carried-out in the study. Analysis of physicochemical data reveals no significant difference in between both varieties of roots, while alkaloid was found to be more in cultivated variety (0.34%) than wild one (0.15%). Though, the analytical profiles are almost identical, except the quantity of alkaloid; inferences should be made through well designed pharmacological and clinical studies.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.119679
PMCID: PMC3821251  PMID: 24250131
Alkaloid; Eranda; high-performance thin layer chromatography; Ricinus communis
3.  Analgesic activity of Nelsonia canescens (Lam.) Spreng.root in albino rats 
Ayu  2013;34(2):226-228.
Present study was undertaken to evaluate analgesic activity of root of Nelsonia canescens (Lam.) Spreng, a folklore medicinal plant used as the one of the source plant of Rasna. Study was carried out at two dose levels (270 mg/kg and 540 mg/kg) in albino rats. Analgesic activity was evaluated in formalin induced paw licking, and tail flick methods whereas indomethacin and pentazocine were used as standard analgesic drugs, respectively. At both the dose levels, test drug non-significantly decreased paw licking response at both time intervals. In tail flick model, the administration of the test drug increased pain threshold response in a dose dependent manner. In therapeutically equivalent dose level, analgesic activity was observed only after 180 min while in TED ×2 treated group analgesia was observed at 30 min and lasted even up to 240 min. The results suggested that N.canescens root possess moderate analgesic activity.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.119688
PMCID: PMC3821256  PMID: 24250136
Analgesic; folklore; gandhamardana hills; Nelsonia canescens; Rasna
4.  In vitro evaluation of antioxidant activity of Cordia dichotoma (Forst f.) bark 
Ayu  2013;34(1):124-128.
Cordia dichotoma Forst. f. bark, identified as botanical source of Shleshmataka in Ayurvedic pharmacopoeia. Present investigation was undertaken to evaluate possible antioxidant potential of methanolic and butanol extract of C. dichotoma bark. In vitro antioxidant activity of methanolic and butanol extract was determined by 1,1, diphenyl–2, picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay. The extracts were also evaluated for their phenolic contents and antioxidant activity. Phenolic content was measured using Folin–Ciocalteu reagent and was calculated as Gallic acid equivalents. Antiradical activity of methanolic extract was measured by DPPH assay and was compared to ascorbic acid and ferric reducing power of the extract was evaluated by Oyaizu method. In the present study three in vitro models were used to evaluate antioxidant activity. The first two methods were for direct measurement of radical scavenging activity and remaining one method evaluated the reducing power. The present study revealed that the C. dichotoma bark has significant radical scavenging activity.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.115451
PMCID: PMC3764870  PMID: 24049418
Antioxidant; anti–radical; Cordia dichotoma; diphenyl–2; picrylhydrazyl; reducing power; Shleshmataka
5.  Pharmacognostical evaluation of Launaea sarmentosa (Willd.) schultz-bip.ex Kuntze root 
Ayu  2013;34(1):90-94.
Launaea sarmentosa (Willd) Schultz-Bip.ex Kuntze (Asteraceae), locally known as Kulhafila in the Maldives, is a creeping herb, native to tropical Indian coastlines. According to anecdotal evidence from locals in the Maldives, the roots of this plant are used as an ingredient of a popular medicinal preparation (Hilibeys) taken by mothers after childbirth. It is also used in various other ailments in different parts of the Maldives, as well as in India. So far, there has been no scientific documentation of this plant. The only source of information available is held by natives and traditional medical practitioners. The present study was conducted on the root of L. sarmentosa for its pharmacognostical and phytochemical characteristics as per Ayurvedic Pharmacopoea of India (API) parameters. The microscopic characteristics of the root show prismatic crystals, multiseriate medullary rays, laticiferous cells, and pitted parenchyma. Qualitative analyses, such as loss on drying, ash value, pH, etc., were conducted. Preliminary phytochemical screening shows the presence of alkaloids, tannin, steroids, etc.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.115439
PMCID: PMC3764888  PMID: 24049412
Asteraceae; Kulhafila; Launaea sarmentosa; pharmacognosy; phytochemistry
6.  Diuretic activity of Linaria ramosissima (wall.) Janch. leaves in albino rats 
Ayu  2012;33(4):576-578.
Linaria ramosissima (Wall.) Janch., Scrophulariaceae, a folklore plant, has been claimed for its diuretic activities by traditional practitioners. The present study was undertaken to investigate the diuretic activity of L. ramosissima leaves in albino rats. Suspension of leaf powder in 2% gum acacia was administered to experimental rats orally at doses of 450 mg/kg. The diuretic effect was evaluated by measuring the urine volume, pH of urine, and urinary electrolyte excretion. Administration of the test drug increased the urine volume in a non-significant manner, while it enhanced the urinary excretion of sodium, chloride, and potassium significantly, in comparison to the control group. From the present study it can be concluded that the leaves of L. ramosissima have a significant diuretic activity.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.110517
PMCID: PMC3665199  PMID: 23723679
Diuretic activity; electrolyte excretion; folklore plant; Linaria ramosissima
7.  Phyto-chemical evaluation of dried aqueous extract of Jivanti [Leptadenia reticulata (Retz.) Wt. et Arn] 
Ayu  2012;33(4):557-560.
Jivanti (Leptadenia reticulata (Retz.) Wt. et Arn) is a well known climber used for its innumerable therapeutic properties like antioxidant, antibacterial, vasodilator, galactogogue, Jivaniya, etc., Its use in veterinary practice is tremendous due to its lactogenic effect. The Ghana (dried aqueous extract) of the whole plant was prepared and evaluated phyto-chemically by subjecting it to various tests like physico-chemical, qualitative analysis; TLC and HPTLC. Qualitative tests revealed the presence of flavonoids and TLC also inferred positive Rf value (0.30), indicating the presence of quercetin in the Ghana.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.110525
PMCID: PMC3665201  PMID: 23723676
Dried extract; Ghana; Jivanti; Leptadenia reticulata; quercetin
8.  Mootrala Karma of Kusha [Imperata cylindrica Beauv.] and Darbha [Desmostachya bipinnata Stapf.] - A comparative study 
Ayu  2012;33(3):387-390.
Kusha (Imperata cylindrica Beauv.) and Darbha (Desmostachya bipinnata Stapf.) are enlisted among Trinapanchamoola, which is a well-known diuretic and are individually enumerated in the Mootravirechaneeya Dashemani. The article deals with the evaluation and comparison of the individual Mootrala (diuretic) action of the two drugs in healthy volunteers. In this study, 29 healthy volunteers were divided into three groups administered with Darbha Moola Churna, Kusha Moola Churna, and placebo in each group for 14 days. The volunteers were subjected to evaluation of diuretic activity by maintaining the daily total input–output charts during the course of the study. The volunteers were advised to consume a minimum 2 l of water daily. Results show that Darbha and Kusha leaded to a percentage increase in urine volume as compared to placebo group, but the result was statistically insignificant.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.108829
PMCID: PMC3665103  PMID: 23723646
Darbha; Desmostachya bipinnata; diuretic; Imperata cylindrica; Kusha; Mootrala
9.  Development of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA markers for authentification of Cissus repanda vahl. 
Ayu  2012;33(2):279-283.
Cissus repanda Vahl. belongs to the family Vitaceae, commonly known in Hindi as “Panivel,” is a large climber distributed all over India. The crushed or powder of root is prescribed by tribal people and traditional medical practitioners of Orissa for its healing properties in cases of bone fracture, cuts and wounds, swellings, and so on. In spite of its reputation, its leaves have not been investigated scientifically. The present study deals with pharmacognostical and molecular characterization by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and their role in laying down standardization and pharmacopoeial parameters. Genomic isolation of DNA from fresh leaves was amplified by RAPD markers. The diagnostic characters are mucilage, calcium oxalate rosette crystals, spiral vessels, and fibers. The unique bands obtained in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification clearly discriminated having, many bright and light bands indicating the genuinity of the plant. RAPD may serve as a complementary tool in quality control of many herbal sources.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.105252
PMCID: PMC3611653  PMID: 23559804
Cissus repanda; pharmacognosy; RAPD
10.  Anti-inflammatory activity of two varieties of Pippali (Piper longum Linn.) 
Ayu  2012;33(2):307-310.
The present study has beenundertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of two varieties of Pippali in acute and sub-acute experimental models of inflammation in albino rats. Four different market samples of each variety of Pippali were procured from different regions of India. The samples collected from South India which have given more extractive values were selected for screening of anti-inflammatory activity. Randomly selected animals were divided into four groups of six animals each. The test drugs were administered orally at a dose of 200 mg/kg and the activity was compared with standard anti-inflammatory drugs in both models. Among the two different test samples studied, it was found that Chhoti variety of Pippali suppressed inflammation of both acute and sub acute phase, while Badi variety of Pippali only of acute phase. Thus for the therapeutic utility, Chhoti variety of Pippali may be considered over the Badi variety.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.105258
PMCID: PMC3611634  PMID: 23559810
Anti-inflammatory; carrageenan; Chhoti Pippali; Pippali; plethysmograph
11.  Effect of Shodhana (processing) on Kupeelu (Strychnos nux-vomica Linn.) with special reference to strychnine and brucine content 
Ayu  2011;32(3):402-407.
Kupeelu (Strychnos nux-vomica Linn.) commonly known as nux vomica is a poisonous plant used extensively in various ayurvedic formulations, with great therapeutic significance. Ayurveda recommended the administration of Kupeelu only after purification in different media like cow's urine (Go mutra), cow's milk (Go dugdha), cow's ghee (Go ghrita), Kanji (sour gruel), and so on. Apart from the classical methods some other methods are also adopted by the traditional practitioners using castor oil (Eranda taila), ginger juice (Ardraka swarasa), in the purification of Kupeelu seeds. In the present study an attempt has been made to purify the seeds by performing two different methods (one classical and another traditional) using Kanji and Ardraka swarasa as Shodhana media. This study reveals that both the methods studied reduce the strychnine and brucine contents in comparison to the raw seeds as determined by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC). After purification in Kanji and Ardraka swarasa, the strychnine content was reduced by 39.25% and 67.82%, respectively, and the brucine content in the purified seeds was also found to have decreased by 17.60% and 40.06%, in comparison to the raw seeds.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.93923
PMCID: PMC3326892  PMID: 22529660
Ardraka swarasa; brucine; kanji; kupeelu; shodhana; strychnine
12.  Critical analysis of herbs acting on Mutravaha srotas 
Ayu  2010;31(2):167-169.
Ayurveda has given prime importance to Mutravaha srotas (urinary system) and Srotogata Vikaras (urinary disorders). Being a system responsible for homeostasis of fluids in the body it also detoxifies the body by eliminating certain waste products through urine. When diseased, people produce symptoms such as, increased or decreased urine production, painful maturition, formation of stones, and thereby obstructed micturition, increased frequency of micturition, and so on. There are many herbs with varied actions specifically aimed at mitigating urinary system disorders. Drugs such as Jambu, Amrasthi, and the like, reduce the increased flow of urine, and hence, are considered as Mutrasangrahaneeya, whereas, drugs like Ikshu, Kustha, and so on, increase the flow of urine, and hence, are considered as Mutravirechaneeya. There are drugs like Padma, Utpala, and so on, which impart normal color to the urine and are known as Mutravirajaneeya dravyas. Asmarighna dravyas break down the calculi and remove them through the urine. These dravyas, when used under proper direction, help in relieving the pain and apathy caused by the disease.
doi:10.4103/0974-8520.72379
PMCID: PMC3215359  PMID: 22131705
Ashmarighna dravya; Mutrasangrahaneeya dravya; Mutravirajaneeya dravya; Mutravirechaneeya dravya; urinary system; herbs

Results 1-12 (12)