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1.  INTEGRATIVE FASCIAL RELEASE & FUNCTIONAL TESTING 
Soft tissue techniques, including Integrative Myofascial Release (IFR) can be more effective if the area of treatment can be determined by functional testing. The patient’s source of pain may not necessarily be located at the area of complaint and functional testing helps in pinpointing the source. Post-treatment functional testing will provide feedback to both the patient and the doctor as to whether the technique was effective. This paper will describe some typical functional tests and treatment using IFR of the posterior cervical/thoracolumbar fascia.
PMCID: PMC2050814  PMID: 17987166
Soft tissue; chiropractic
2.  A CASE OF A PATHOGENIC ACTIVE SCAR 
Soft tissues follow every movement of bones and joints. Their free movement is essential for normal functioning of the motor system. Scars form mainly in the soft tissues, and if abnormal, or ‘active’, can interfere with the function of the motor system as well. For diagnosis and treatment the barrier phenomenon is a most useful concept: a pathological barrier restricts movement and does not spring when engaged. After engaging the barrier and waiting, release, relief and normal mobility are obtained. An illustrative case with an active appendectomy scar is presented, with both low back and abdominal pain. Extensive and costly examination were all negative. After diagnosis and treatment of the active scar symptoms were promptly relieved. Diagnosis and treatment of active scars should become part of the physical therapist’s approach to the patient’s problems.
PMCID: PMC2050813  PMID: 17987167
Soft tissue; chiropractic
3.  SPECIFIC SEQUENTIAL MYOFASCIAL TRIGGER POINT THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF A PATIENT WITH MYOFASCIAL PAIN SYNDROME ASSOCIATED WITH REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY 
A patient with traumatic rotator cuff tear of the left shoulder developed severe myofascial pain syndrome with reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) involving the left upper extremity. He was unable to tolerate any type of manual therapy or needle treatment due to severe allodynia in the whole left upper limb. This patient presented for treatment approximately 6 months after the onset of trauma. Treatment consisting of specific myofascial trigger point (MTrP) therapy, beginning with desensitization and gentle massage on the MTrP of the first dorsal interosseous muscle, followed by treatment of MTrPs of the wrist-finger extensors and anterior deltoid muscles was commenced. Allodynia was remarkably reduced and further physical therapy with modalities was administered. After 2 weeks of daily MTrP therapy, he received local steroid injection to the left shoulder and continued MTrP therapy 2-3 times per week. Approximately 2 months after the injection the patient was almost pain free with nearly full range of motion in his left shoulder. The mechanism of MTrPs and their association with RSD is discussed in this paper.
PMCID: PMC2050812  PMID: 17987165
Manual therapy; muscle pain; Myofascial Trigger Points; Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy
4.  SOFT TISSUE & ANCILLARY TECHNIQUES 
PMCID: PMC2050811
Soft tissue techniques; chiropractic

Results 1-4 (4)