PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-3 (3)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Cobb Angle Measurement of Scoliosis Using Computer Measurement of Digitally Acquired Radiographs-Intraobserver and Interobserver Variability 
Asian Spine Journal  2008;2(2):90-93.
Study Design
We evaluated computer assisted digital measurement of radiographic parameters in patients with idiopathic scoliosis.
Purpose
To assess the reliability of digital measurements.
Overview of Literature
Various authors analyzed scoliotic deformities by conventional radiographs, but very few studies have addressed the reliability of digital radiographic measurement using computer software.
Methods
Three independent, blinded observers measured 318 whole spine pre-operative antero-posterior radiograms of children with varying degrees of idiopathic scoliosis. Only one curve per radiograph was measured. Each observer measured the Cobb angle three times with a 1-week gap between each measurement. The computer system, picture archiving and communication system (PACS, PiViewSTAR version 5) was used in all cases. The end vertebrae were pre-selected to avoid this as a potential source of error. The results were statistically analyzed for intraobserver and interobserver reliability and variability.
Results
The 95% confidence intervals for intraobserver and interobserver variability were ±1.30 and ±1.260, respectively. There was better reliability in larger curves.
Conclusions
Measurement using a digitized system may help to minimize measurement discrepancies by eliminating an intrinsic cause of error.
doi:10.4184/asj.2008.2.2.90
PMCID: PMC2852087  PMID: 20404962
Scoliosis; Digital imaging; Cobb angle; Intraobserver and interobserver variability
2.  Comparison of Apical Axial Derotation between Adolescent Idiopathic and Neuromuscular Scoliosis with Pedicle Screw Instrumentation 
Asian Spine Journal  2008;2(2):74-80.
Study Design
A retrospective study.
Purpose
To compare outcomes of apical derotation with pedicle screws in idiopathic and neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS).
Overview of Literature
No information about apical derotation in NMS with pedicle screws is available.
Methods
We performed deformity correcting surgery using pedicle screw constructs on 12 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients (mean age 14.1 years) and 16 NMS patients (mean age 16.5 years). Preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up radiographs were analyzed for Cobb's angle and pelvic obliquity, while apical rotation was measured on CT scans using the Aaro-Dahlborn method.
Results
For AIS, the mean preoperative Cobb's angle, pelvic obliquity, and apical rotation values were 57.3°, 2.8°, and 20.4°, respectively, and postoperatively they were 16.8°, 1.1° and 14.7°, respectively, showing significant correction. For NMS, the mean preoperative Cobb's angle, pelvic obliquity, and apical rotation values were 75.6°, 13.7°, and 42.9°, respectively, and postoperatively they were 27.1°, 5.8°, and 34.1°, respectively, also showing significant correction. There were no significant differences between AIS and NMS patients Cobb's angle p=0.306, pelvic obliquity p=0.887 and apical derotation p=0.113°. There were no differences in curve severity in the three groups (AIS, NMS >80°and NMS <80°); or the correction of apical rotation (p=0.25), although less correction was achieved in the Cobb's angle in the >80 NMS group (p=0.04).
Conclusions
Apical axial derotation can be achieved with posterior only pedicle screw fixation in NMS without anterior release, with comparable results in idiopathic scoliosis.
doi:10.4184/asj.2008.2.2.74
PMCID: PMC2852093  PMID: 20404960
Idiopathic scoliosis and neuromuscular scoliosis; Posterior only pedicle screw fixation; Computed tomography scan; Apical derotation
3.  Muscle Imbalance in Volleyball Players Initiates Scoliosis in Immature Spines: A Screening Analysis 
Asian Spine Journal  2008;2(1):38-43.
Study Design
Retrospective comparative study using radiographs and clinical findings.
Purpose
To test the hypothesis that asymmetric loading of immature spines in young athletes initiates scoliosis.
Overview of Literature
Scoliosis in athletes has been reported in the literature, but its causative factors have not been investigated.
Methods
We compared the incidence, type and magnitude of scoliotic curves in volleyball players with those in the non-player population. One hundred sixteen adolescent volleyball players were grouped for selective screening. Data regarding their playing duration, handedness, age, height, and menarchal status (in girls) were recorded, along with clinical examination and radiological investigation when necessary. We analyzed data from 46,428 non-player school children, and their data were compared to athletes to determine differences.
Results
Volleyball players had a statistically significant increase in the incidence of scoliotic spinal curves. Playing hand dominance was related to the curve direction. Cobb angle had no significant correlation with the duration of playing.
Conclusions
There is a five-fold increase in the incidence of mild scoliosis in volleyball players. A high percentage (41%) of asymmetry was present on the Adams forward bending test, as compared to controls. The curves were either thoracic or thoracolumbar.
doi:10.4184/asj.2008.2.1.38
PMCID: PMC2857490  PMID: 20411141
Volleyball players; Asymmetric loading; Column buckling; Scoliosis; Etiology

Results 1-3 (3)