PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-4 (4)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Acute Intravenous Injection Toxicity Study of Escherichia coli-Derived Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Rat 
Asian Spine Journal  2014;8(2):113-118.
Study Design
Prospective in vivo toxicity study.
Purpose
To evaluate the conducted acute toxicity study of Escherichia coli (E. coli)-derived recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) with 6-weeks old Sprague-Dawley rats.
Overview of Literature
rhBMP-2 has well-known osteoinductivity and it is used as a bone graft substitute. E. coli-derived rhBMP-2 can be mass-produced with relatively low costs. E. coli-derived rhBMP-2 facilitates osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation in vitro and in vivo. However, studies regarding side effects or toxicity of E. coli-derived rhBMP-2 have not been published. Thus, we conducted the acute toxicity study of E. coli-derived rhBMP-2 on 6-weeks old Sprague-Dawley rats.
Methods
One mg of BMP-2 was diluted in 0.285 mL of glycine buffer to prepare high BMP-2 concentrations (3.5 mg/mL). Intermediate (0.9 mg/mL) or low (0.35 mg/mL) concentrations of BMP-2 solution was prepared by serial dilutions. The compound was administrated at a dose of 0, 0.7, 1.8, 7 mg/kg by single intravenous injection to five of male and female rats. After the injection, the gross general observations including changes of body weight and histopathological analysis was performed for 14 days.
Results
No animal was found dead during the experiment and the body weight changes were both statistically insignificant in the control and experimental groups. No abnormal sign was shown in general observations and autopsy examinations.
Conclusions
Thus, the lethal dose of E. coli-derived rhBMP-2 should be higher than 7 mg/kg with a single intravenous injection.
doi:10.4184/asj.2014.8.2.113
PMCID: PMC3996333  PMID: 24761191
Recombinant human-bone morphogenetic protein-2; Acute toxicity test; Mortality; Intravenous injection
2.  Adjacent Segment Degeneration after Single-Level PLIF: Comparison between Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis, Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Spinal Stenosis 
Asian Spine Journal  2011;5(2):82-90.
Study Design
A retrospective study.
Purpose
To comparatively investigated the rate of the adjacent segment degeneration and the clinical outcomes in patients with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis or degenerative spondylolisthesis.
Overview of Literature
There have been few studies reported on the adjacent segment degeneration following posterior lumbar interbody fusion(PLIF). Many risk factors for the adjacent segment degeneration following PLIF have been proposed. The range of decompression has been presented as one of the risk factors, yet controversial.
Methods
This study enrolled sixty-three patients who had been treated with single-level PLIF and who were followed up for more than two years. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the preoperative diagnosis. We analyzed the difference between the preoperative and postoperative intervertebral disc heights of the superior adjacent segments. The incidence rates of instability and the clinical outcomes were comparatively analyzed between each group.
Results
The average age of the patients was 55.8 years in the spondylolytic spondylolisthesis group, 65.9 years in the degenerative spondylolisthesis group and 60.4 years in the spinal stenosis group. The average follow-up period was 44 months, 43 months and 42 months, respectively. At the last follow-up, compared to the preoperative period, the intervertebral disc height decreased in all three groups. A statistically significant decrease (p < 0.01) was observed only in the spondylolytic spondylolisthesis group and no significant difference was observed between each group (p = 0.41). The incidence rate of instability and the clinical outcome were not significantly different between each group.
Conclusions
Spondylolytic spondylolisthesis with total laminectomy and single-level PLIF showed no significant difference in the superior adjacent segment degeneration and instability, and the clinical outcome as compared to that of partial laminectomy with single-level PLIF for treating degenerative spondylolisthesis or spinal stenosis.
doi:10.4184/asj.2011.5.2.82
PMCID: PMC3095806  PMID: 21629482
Spondylolytic spondylolisthesis; Adjacent segment disease; Posterior lumbar interbody fusion
3.  Prevalence and Morphologic Features of Ponticulus Posticus in Koreans: Analysis of 312 Radiographs and 225 Three-dimensional CT Scans 
Asian Spine Journal  2007;1(1):27-31.
Study Design
A retrospective review of three-dimensional CT scan images and radiographs.
Purpose
To investigate the prevalence and morphologic features of ponticulus posticus in Koreans.
Overview of Literature
There has been little reported on the prevalence or morphologic characteristics of ponticulus posticus in Asians, predisposing them to vertebral artery injury during screw placement in the lateral mass of the atlas.
Methods
The presence and types of ponticulus posticus were investigated on 225 consecutive cervical three-dimensional CT scans and 312 consecutive digital lateral cephalometric head radiographs.
Results
Various spectra of ponticulus posticus were found in 26% of the CT scans and 14% of the radiographs.
Conclusions
Ponticulus posticus is a relatively common anomaly in Koreans. Therefore, the presence of this anomaly should be carefully examined for on radiographs before lateral mass screw placement. If ponticulus posticus is suspected or confirmed on radiographs, three-dimensional CT scanning should be considered before placement of lateral mass screws into the posterior arch, especially given its wide variation of size and shape.
doi:10.4184/asj.2007.1.1.27
PMCID: PMC2857493  PMID: 20411149
Ponticulus posticus; Atlas; Lateral mass screw
4.  High-Intensity Zone on L-spine MRI: Clinical Relevance and Association with Trauma History 
Asian Spine Journal  2007;1(1):38-42.
Study Design
This is a retrospective study.
Purpose
We wanted to investigate the clinical relevance of the lumbar high intensity zone (HIZ) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the relationship of trauma history to internal disc disruption (IDD).
Overview of Literature
HIZs on lumbar spine (L-spine) MRI have been suggested as a reliable marker of IDD by some authors. The prevalence and type of spinal trauma in IDD have not yet been carefully analyzed.
Methods
L-spine MRIs of 737 patients with low back pain with or without associated leg pain were reviewed for the presence of HIZs. HIZs on T2-weighted MR images were determined according to the Aprill and Bogduk criteria. A review of medical records and a telephone interview were performed for further analyses of pain.
Results
HIZs were found in 117 patients and 153 discs among a total of 737 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Both a medical record review and a telephone interview were possible with 99 patients. Among these, 42 patients had had an episode of trauma. Seventeen of these had a relatively high-energy injury such as a traffic accident or a fall. Regarding back pain, 27 patients complained of typical discogenic back pain. Only 11 patients had both a trauma history and typical discogenic pain and 41 patients (42%) had neither a trauma history nor typical natural pain.
Conclusions
Given the low incidence of discogenic pain, a HIZ on an L-spine MRI appears less meaningful than often assumed as a specific marker of IDD. Trauma, such as a traffic accident, seems unlikely to be the main cause of IDD.
doi:10.4184/asj.2007.1.1.38
PMCID: PMC2857501  PMID: 20411151
High-intensity zone; Trauma history; Discogenic pain; Internal disc disruption

Results 1-4 (4)