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1.  A prospective study for prevalence and/or development of transfusion-transmitted infections in multiply transfused thalassemia major patients 
Objective:
To evaluate the rate of seropositivity to hepatitis B and C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections among children with β-thalassemia major receiving multiple transfusions in Ahmedabad, India, compared with healthy controls.
Materials and Methods:
The study was performed during January 2007 to January 2009 on multi-transfused children suffering with β-thalassemia major registered in the Prathama Blood Centre, Ahmedabad; Jeevandeep hospital, Ahmedabad; and Red Cross Blood Centre, Ahmedabad, and investigated for the prevalence and development of transfusion-transmitted infections. Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg), anti-Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Antibodies (Ab), and HIV Ab were checked using a fourth-generation Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Positive tests were confirmed by western blots. Healthy blood donors were used for the control group.
Results:
Hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV Ab, and HIV Ab were positive in one of 96 (1.04%; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.17–1.3), 24 of 96 (25%; 95% CI = 11.4–14.2), and one of 96 (1.04%; 95% CI = 0.12–1.3), respectively. The rate of anti-HCV Ab was significantly higher in multi-transfused children suffering with β-thalassemia major. In thalassemia patients, the rate of positive anti-HCV Ab was significantly higher than that for positive HBsAg (P<0.001) and HIV Ab (P<0.001).
Conclusion:
It is concluded that HCV is the current major problem in multi-transfused children with thalassemia major and more careful pretransfusion screening of blood for anti-HCV must be introduced in blood centers.
doi:10.4103/0973-6247.98919
PMCID: PMC3439754  PMID: 22988380
Hepatitis B; hepatitis C; Human immunodeficiency virus; β-thalassemia major; seroprevalence
3.  Serial follow-up of repeat voluntary blood donors reactive for anti-HCV ELISA 
Background:
Voluntary non-remunerated repeat blood donors are perceived to be safer than the first time blood donors. This study was planned for follow-up of previous hepatitis C virus (HCV) test results of anti-HCV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) reactive repeat blood donors. The aim was to suggest a protocol for re-entry of the blood donors who are confirmed HCV negative by nucleic acid test (NAT) and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA). A group of repeat voluntary donors were followed retrospectively who became reactive on a cross sectional study and showed HCV reactivity while donating blood regularly.
Material and Methods:
A total of 51,023 voluntary non remunerated blood donors were screened for anti-HCV ELISA routinely. If anybody showed positivity, they were tested by two ELISA kits (screening and confirmatory) and then confirmed infection status by NAT and or RIBA. The previous HCV test results of repeat donors reactive by anti-HCV ELISA were looked back from the records. Data of donors who were repeat reactive with single ELISA kit (in the present study) were analyzed separately from those reactive with two ELISA kits (in the present study).
Results:
In this study, 140 (0.27%) donors who were reactive by anti HCV ELISA were included. Out of them, 35 were repeat voluntary donors and 16 (11.43%) were reactive with single ELISA kit. All 16 donors were reactive by single ELISA kit occasionally in previous donations. Their present ELISA positive donations were negative for HCV NAT and RIBA. A total of 19 (13.57%) donors were reactive with two ELISA kits. In their previous donations, the donors who were reactive even once with two ELISA kits were consistently reactive by the same two ELISA kits in their next donations also.
Conclusion:
Donor sample reactive by only single ELISA kit may not be considered as infectious for disposal as they were negative by NAT and or RIBA. One time ELISA positivity was found probably due to ELISA kit specificity and sensitivity. Donors reactive with two ELISA kit should be discarded as there is a high positivity with NAT/ RIBA. However, donors reactive by two ELISA kits and negative by NAT and RIBA should be followed up and may not be deferred permanently.
doi:10.4103/0973-6247.75979
PMCID: PMC3082711  PMID: 21572711
Anti-HCV ELISA; repeat voluntary blood donor; occult infections; donor follow-up; nucleic acid test; recombinant immunoblot assay
4.  Visual detection of hemolysis in a blood bag before issue 
doi:10.4103/0973-6247.76013
PMCID: PMC3082726  PMID: 21572725
5.  Management in Indian blood banking system: True reality 
doi:10.4103/0973-6247.53871
PMCID: PMC2920472  PMID: 20808646
6.  Can there be blood units of high and low quality? 
doi:10.4103/0973-6247.45254
PMCID: PMC2798773  PMID: 20041087
7.  Prices of blood units in South East Asia 
doi:10.4103/0973-6247.42690
PMCID: PMC2798761  PMID: 20041075
8.  Transfusion Medicine in the year 2025: Facts or Fantasy? 
doi:10.4103/0973-6247.39501
PMCID: PMC2798755  PMID: 20041068

Results 1-8 (8)