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1.  Neuropsychological Profile of Executive Function in Girls with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder 
The majority of research on neurobehavioral functioning among children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is based on samples comprised primarily (or exclusively) of boys. Although functional impairment is well established, available research has yet to specify a neuropsychological profile distinct to girls with ADHD. The purpose of this study was to examine performance within four components of executive function (EF) in contemporaneously recruited samples of girls and boys with ADHD. Fifty-six children with ADHD (26 girls) and 90 controls (42 girls), ages 8–13, were administered neuropsychological tests emphasizing response inhibition, response preparation, working memory, and planning/shifting. There were no significant differences in age or SES between boys or girls with ADHD or their sex-matched controls; ADHD subtype distribution did not differ by sex. Compared with controls, children with ADHD showed significant deficits on all four EF components. Girls and boys with ADHD showed similar patterns of deficit on tasks involving response preparation and working memory; however, they manifested different patterns of executive dysfunction on tasks related to response inhibition and planning. Girls with ADHD showed elevated motor overflow, while boys with ADHD showed greater impairment during conscious, effortful response inhibition. Girls, but not boys with ADHD, showed impairment in planning. There were no differences between ADHD subtypes on any EF component. These findings highlight the importance of studying boys and girls separately (as well as together) when considering manifestations of executive dysfunction in ADHD.
doi:10.1093/arclin/acq050
PMCID: PMC2957961  PMID: 20639299
Attention; Response control; Working memory; Inhibition; Planning; Childhood; Development
2.  Prediction of ADHD in Boys and Girls Using the D-KEFS 
To examine patterns of executive dysfunction associated with ADHD, 123 children (54 ADHD, 69 controls) ages 8–16 years were administered selected subtests from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS). Children with ADHD performed significantly worse than controls on measures of both basic (less executive demand) skills and those with more executive demand from the Color-Word Interference and Tower subtests; however, no group differences were noted on any of the D-KEFS contrast scores. Most subtype comparisons yielded no differences; however, children with the Combined subtype outperformed children with the Inattentive subtype on measures of both basic and executive skills from the Trail Making Test. Children with ADHD demonstrate executive dysfunction that is identified by both D-KEFS summary, but not contrast scores. In this carefully screened sample of children with ADHD, few significant differences were found between groups suggesting limited sensitivity or specificity of the D-KEFS for classifying children with ADHD.
doi:10.1016/j.acn.2007.12.004
PMCID: PMC2427435  PMID: 18243646
ADHD; Subtype; Executive Function; Classification; Children; Pediatrics

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