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1.  Spontaneous Strategy Use Protects Against Visual Working Memory Deficits in Older Adults Infected with HIV 
Recent studies suggest that older human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults are at particular risk for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), including dementia. Deficits in attention/working memory are posited to play a central role in the development of HAND among older adults. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible protective benefits of spontaneous strategy use during a visual working memory task in 46 older and 42 younger adults infected with HIV. Results revealed a significant interaction between age and strategy use, with older adults who used a meta-cognitive strategy demonstrating superior working memory performance versus non-strategy users. This effect was not observed in the younger HIV-infected sample and was not better explained by possible confounding factors, such as education, comorbid medical conditions, or HIV disease severity. Within the older group, strategy use was associated with better executive functions and higher estimated verbal intelligence. Findings from this study suggest that working memory declines in older HIV-infected adults are moderated by the use of higher-level mnemonic strategies and may inform cognitive neurorehabilitation efforts to improve cognitive and everyday functioning outcomes in older persons living with HIV infection.
doi:10.1093/arclin/acq069
PMCID: PMC2979348  PMID: 20876195
Human immunodeficiency virus; Working memory; Aging; Strategies; Neuropsychology
2.  Prospective Memory in HIV Infection: Is “Remembering to Remember” a Unique Predictor of Self-reported Medication Management? 
Optimal adherence to antiretroviral medications is critical to the effective long-term management of HIV infection. Although prospective memory (ProM; i.e., “remembering to remember”) has long been theorized to play an important role in medication adherence, no prior studies have evaluated whether HIV-associated ProM impairment possesses unique predictive value in this regard. Results from this study demonstrate a robust association between ProM impairment and self-reported medication management in 87 HIV-infected persons currently prescribed antiretroviral medications. Specifically, more frequent ProM complaints and performance deficits on both laboratory and semi-naturalistic ProM tasks were all independently related to poorer self-reported medication management. A series of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that HIV-associated ProM impairment accounted for a significant amount of variance in self-reported medication management beyond that which was explained by other factors known to predict nonadherence, including mood disorders, psychosocial variables, environmental structure, and deficits on a traditional battery of neuropsychological tests. Overall, these findings support the hypothesis that ProM captures a unique and largely untapped aspect of cognition that is germane to optimal medication adherence. The potential benefits of individualized remediation strategies that are informed by conceptual models of ProM and specifically target medication adherence warrant further exploration.
doi:10.1016/j.acn.2007.12.006
PMCID: PMC2408931  PMID: 18243645
Human immunodeficiency virus; Neuropsychological assessment; Episodic memory; Treatment compliance
3.  Frequency and predictors of self-reported prospective memory complaints in individuals infected with HIV 
Failures of episodic retrospective memory (RetM) are among the most frequently reported cognitive complaints endorsed by individuals living with HIV infection. The present study sought to examine the nature, frequency, and determinants of self-reported complaints of prospective memory (ProM) in HIV, which is a singly dissociable and ecologically relevant aspect of episodic memory involving the execution of future intentions. Seventy-five HIV seropositive individuals and 60 seronegative volunteers were administered the Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PMRQ) as part of extensive neuropsychological, psychiatric, and medical research assessments. The HIV sample endorsed more frequent ProM complaints in daily life than the seronegative group, particularly on items requiring self-initiated cue detection and retrieval. Within both study groups, ProM complaints were significantly more frequent than RetM complaints. Although the HIV sample was impaired relative to the seronegative group on an objective, performance-based ProM test, self-reported ProM complaints did not correspond to actual ProM abilities. However, greater frequency of self-reported ProM complaints was moderately associated with increased fatigue, as well as with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Consistent with prior research on RetM in HIV, results indicate that affective distress contributes to a metamemory deficit for HIV-associated ProM impairment, which highlights the potential importance of assessing both self-reported and performance-based ProM in clinical and research neuroAIDS evaluations.
doi:10.1016/j.acn.2006.12.006
PMCID: PMC1851919  PMID: 17289343
Human immunodeficiency virus; Neuropsychological assessment; Self-report; Fatigue; Episodic memory; Metacognition

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