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1.  Are Time- and Event-based Prospective Memory Comparably Affected in HIV Infection?† 
According to the multi-process theory of prospective memory (ProM), time-based tasks rely more heavily on strategic processes dependent on prefrontal systems than do event-based tasks. Given the prominent frontostriatal pathophysiology of HIV infection, one would expect HIV-infected individuals to demonstrate greater deficits in time-based versus event-based ProM. However, the two prior studies examining this question have produced variable results. We evaluated this hypothesis in 143 individuals with HIV infection and 43 demographically similar seronegative adults (HIV−) who completed the research version of the Memory for Intentions Screening Test, which yields parallel subscales of time- and event-based ProM. Results showed main effects of HIV serostatus and cue type, but no interaction between serostatus and cue. Planned pair-wise comparisons showed a significant effect of HIV on time-based ProM and a trend-level effect on event-based ProM that was driven primarily by the subset of participants with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Nevertheless, time-based ProM was more strongly correlated with measures of executive functions, attention/working memory, and verbal fluency in HIV-infected persons. Although HIV-associated deficits in time- and event-based ProM appear to be of comparable severity, the cognitive architecture of time-based ProM may be more strongly influenced by strategic monitoring and retrieval processes.
doi:10.1093/arclin/acr020
PMCID: PMC3081684  PMID: 21459901
AIDS dementia complex; Episodic memory; Executive functions; Neuropsychological assessment
2.  Prospective Memory in HIV Infection: Is “Remembering to Remember” a Unique Predictor of Self-reported Medication Management? 
Optimal adherence to antiretroviral medications is critical to the effective long-term management of HIV infection. Although prospective memory (ProM; i.e., “remembering to remember”) has long been theorized to play an important role in medication adherence, no prior studies have evaluated whether HIV-associated ProM impairment possesses unique predictive value in this regard. Results from this study demonstrate a robust association between ProM impairment and self-reported medication management in 87 HIV-infected persons currently prescribed antiretroviral medications. Specifically, more frequent ProM complaints and performance deficits on both laboratory and semi-naturalistic ProM tasks were all independently related to poorer self-reported medication management. A series of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that HIV-associated ProM impairment accounted for a significant amount of variance in self-reported medication management beyond that which was explained by other factors known to predict nonadherence, including mood disorders, psychosocial variables, environmental structure, and deficits on a traditional battery of neuropsychological tests. Overall, these findings support the hypothesis that ProM captures a unique and largely untapped aspect of cognition that is germane to optimal medication adherence. The potential benefits of individualized remediation strategies that are informed by conceptual models of ProM and specifically target medication adherence warrant further exploration.
doi:10.1016/j.acn.2007.12.006
PMCID: PMC2408931  PMID: 18243645
Human immunodeficiency virus; Neuropsychological assessment; Episodic memory; Treatment compliance

Results 1-2 (2)