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1.  Congenital bronchopulmonary malformations: A single-center experience and a review of literature 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2008;3(4):135-139.
PURPOSE:
To present a single-center experience with 25 cases of bronchopulmonary malformations and the review the literature.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients with congenital bronchopulmonary malformations who were operated between July 1997 and July 2007 in our institute; we examined the modes of presentations, management, and outcome. Outcome of all patients was assessed over a short follow-up period (average 1.8 months).
RESULTS:
Out of 25 patients, 18 (72%) were male and 7 (28%) were female. Age of patients ranged from 1 day to 11 years. The histopathological diagnosis was congenital cystic adenomatoid malformations [CCAM; n = 14 (56%)], congenital lobar emphysema [CLE; n = 5 (20%)], pulmonary sequestrations [PS; n = 3 (12%)], and bronchogenic cysts [BC; n = 3 (12%)]. Antenatal diagnosis was available in only 2 (8%) patients. The common presenting symptoms were respiratory distress and chest infections. Lobectomy was the procedure of choice . Mortality was 16% (n = 4; M: F = 3: 1). Two patients died because of overwhelming sepsis, one from compromised cardiac function, and one from aspiration which might possibly have been prevented.
CONCLUSION:
Patients with progressive respiratory distress due to these anomalies may require urgent surgical intervention regardless of age. The surgical outcome is favorable, with manageable complications. Plain x-ray chest and CT of thorax are usually sufficient for diagnosis and planning of treatment. Pathological diagnosis may differ from the imaging diagnosis. Mortality is found to be more in neonates. Apart from initial stabilization, resection of lesion and careful postoperative care is necessary to reduce mortality and morbidity.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.43080
PMCID: PMC2700447  PMID: 19561895
BC; CCAM; CLE; congenital bronchopulmonary malformations; lobectomy; PS
2.  Ectopia cordis associated with Cantrell's pentalogy 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2008;3(4):152-153.
Cantrell's pentalogy with ectopia cordis is an extremely rare and lethal congenital anomaly, with a reported incidence of 1:100000 births in developed countries. We report a neonate who presented with ectopia cordis along with cleft lower sternum, upper abdominal wall defect, ectopic umbilicus, diaphragmatic defect, and interventricular septal defect. The neonate had respiratory distress with peripheral cyanosis and died because of acidosis and electrolyte imbalance before surgical intervention could be undertaken. We discuss the case and present a brief review of literature and of embryogenesis
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.43084
PMCID: PMC2700445  PMID: 19561899
Abdominal wall defect; Cantrell's pentalogy; ectopia cordis
3.  Unusual variant of Cantrell's pentalogy? 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2008;3(3):106-107.
A 12-hour-old male infant presented with prolapsed abdominal content through a defect on left side of chest wall with respiratory distress. A thorough clinical examination suggested absence of ectopia cordis, abdominal wall defect, and any bony anomaly. The child expired after 6 hours of admission because of respiratory distress and electrolyte imbalance. Is congenital defect of chest wall associated with diaphragmatic hernia without ectopia cordis and omphalocele, an unusual variant of Cantrell's pentalogy?
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.41916
PMCID: PMC2700442  PMID: 19561890
Cantrell's pentalogy; chest wall defect; congenital diaphragmatic hernia

Results 1-3 (3)