PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-7 (7)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Pictorial review of intrathoracic manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2014;9(4):193-202.
Intra-thoracic manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) are not well known particularly the imaging features, which forms the basis of accurate and timely diagnosis. The aim of this study is to familiarize the physicians and radiologists with these features. The diagnosis can remain elusive because of the non-specific nature of symptoms which mimic many common conditions. Thus, the diagnosis of PSS can be missed leading to continuous morbidity if the correct imaging is not pursued. The authors examined the records of rheumatology patient referrals of over a 5 year period. A hundred and seventy patients with systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disorders were chosen for detailed study of the imaging available, which form the basis of this review. The images included conventional chest radiographs, digital radiographs computed radiography (CT) and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Where applicable computed pulmonary angiography (CTPA) and radionuclide scans were also interrogated.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.140121
PMCID: PMC4166065  PMID: 25276237
Imaging; mixed connective tissue disorders; progressive systemic sclerosis; systemic sclerosis
2.  Atypical radiological manifestations of thoracic sarcoidosis: A review and pictorial essay 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2013;8(4):186-196.
Thoracic sarcoidosis is a common disease, with well-described and recognizable radiographic features. Nevertheless, most physicians are not familiar with the rare atypical often-confusing manifestations of thoracic sarcoid. Although these findings have been previously reviewed, but more recent advances in imaging and laboratory science, need to be incorporated. We present a review of literature and illustrate the review with unpublished data, intended to provide a more recent single comprehensive reference to assist with the diagnosis when atypical radiographic findings of thoracic sarcoidosis are encountered. Thoracic involvement accounts for most of morbidity and mortality associated with sarcoidosis. An accurate timely identification is required to minimize morbidity and mortality. It is essential to recognize atypical imaging findings and relate these to clinical manifestations and histology.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.118490
PMCID: PMC3821277  PMID: 24250731
Atypical; cardiology; chest; radiology; sarcoidosis
3.  Pulmonary vascular complications of chronic liver disease: Pathophysiology, imaging, and treatment 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2011;6(2):57-65.
To review the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular complications of liver disease, we discuss their clinical implications, and therapeutic considerations, with emphasis on potential reversibility of the hepatopulmonary syndrome after liver transplantation. In this review, we also discuss the role of imaging in pulmonary vascular complications associated with liver disease.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.78412
PMCID: PMC3081557  PMID: 21572693
Hepatopulmonary syndrome; portopulmonary hypertension; pulmonary arteriovenous shunts; Yttrium-90 microsphere embolization hepatocellular carcinoma
4.  Imaging lung manifestations of HIV/AIDS 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2010;5(4):201-216.
Advances in our understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have led to improved care and incremental increases in survival. However, the pulmonary manifestations of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Respiratory complaints are not infrequent in patients who are HIV positive. The great majority of lung complications of HIV/AIDS are of infectious etiology but neoplasm, interstitial pneumonias, Kaposi sarcoma and lymphomas add significantly to patient morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of lung of complications associated with HIV. Accurate diagnosis is based on an understanding of the pathogenesis of the processes involved and their imaging findings. Imaging also plays an important role in selection of the most appropriate site for tissue sampling, staging of disease and follow-ups. We present images of lung manifestations of HIV/AIDS, describing the salient features and the differential diagnosis.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.69106
PMCID: PMC2954374  PMID: 20981180
HIV/AIDS; imaging lung; mediastinal manifestations
5.  The calcified lung nodule: What does it mean? 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2010;5(2):67-79.
The aim of this review is to present a pictorial essay emphasizing the various patterns of calcification in pulmonary nodules (PN) to aid diagnosis and to discuss the differential diagnosis and the pathogenesis where it is known. The imaging evaluation of PN is based on clinical history, size, distribution and the gross appearance of the nodule as well as feasibility of obtaining a tissue diagnosis. Imaging is instrumental in the management of PN and one should strive not only to identify small malignant tumors with high survival rates but to spare patients with benign PN from undergoing unnecessary surgery. The review emphasizes how to achieve these goals. One of the most reliable imaging features of a benign lesion is a benign pattern of calcification and periodic follow-up with computed tomography showing no growth for 2 years. Calcification in PN is generally considered as a pointer toward a possible benign disease. However, as we show here, calcification in PN as a criterion to determine benign nature is fallacious and can be misleading. The differential considerations of a calcified lesion include calcified granuloma, hamartoma, carcinoid, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma and lung metastases or a primary bronchogenic carcinoma among others. We describe and illustrate different patterns of calcification as seen in PN on imaging.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.62469
PMCID: PMC2883201  PMID: 20582171
Benign pulmonary nodules; malignant pulmonary nodules; calcification
6.  Reading chest radiographs in the critically ill (Part II): Radiography of lung pathologies common in the ICU patient 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2009;4(3):149-157.
This is part II of two series review of reading chest radiographs in the critically ill. Conventional chest radiography remains the cornerstone of day to day management of the critically ill occasionally supplemented by computed tomography or ultrasound for specific indications. In this second review we discuss radiographic findings of cardiopulmonary disorders common in the intensive care patient and suggest guidelines for interpretation based not only on imaging but also on the pathophysiology and clinical grounds.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.53349
PMCID: PMC2714572  PMID: 19641649
Chest x-ray; intensive care unit; cardiopulmonary disorders

Results 1-7 (7)