PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-5 (5)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Sleep medicine services in Saudi Arabia: The 2013 national survey 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2014;9(1):45-47.
BACKGROUND:
We conducted this national survey to quantitatively assess sleep medicine services in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and to identify obstacles that specialists and hospitals face, precluding the establishment of this service.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
A self-administered questionnaire was designed to collect the following: General information regarding each hospital, information regarding sleep medicine facilities (SFs), the number of beds, the number of sleep studies performed and obstacles to the establishment of SFs. The questionnaire and a cover letter explaining the study objectives were mailed and distributed by respiratory care practitioners to 32 governmental hospitals and 18 private hospitals and medical centers in the KSA.
RESULTS:
The survey identified 18 SFs in the KSA. The estimated per capita number of beds/year/100,000 people was 0.11 and the per capita polysomnography (PSG) rate was 18.0 PSG/year/100,000 people. The most important obstacles to the progress of sleep medicine in the KSA were a lack of trained sleep technologists and a lack of sleep medicine specialists.
CONCLUSION:
The sleep medicine services provided in the KSA have improved since the 2005 survey; however, these services are still below the level of service provided in developed countries. Organized efforts are needed to overcome the identified obstacles and challenges to the progress of sleep medicine in the KSA.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.124444
PMCID: PMC3912688  PMID: 24551019
Polysomnography; quantitative assessment; sleep disorders center; sleep medicine service; sleep technologists
2.  Clinical characteristics of amyloidosis with isolated respiratory system involvement: A review of 13 cases 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2012;7(4):243-249.
BACKGROUND:
Isolated pulmonary amyloidosis is a very rare disease.
METHODS:
We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with pathologically proven isolated pulmonary amyloidosis treated at our hospital from 1990 to 2011.
RESULTS:
There were 9 males and 4 females with a mean age of 54.7 years (range, 45–72 years) and the mean course of disease was 46.5 months (range, 5 months–15 years). The most common symptoms were cough (10/13), expectoration (8/13), hemoptysis (4/13), chest tightness (12/13), dyspnea (10/13), chest pain (3/13), fever (5/13), and body weight loss (2/13). Radiological findings included tracheal stenosis (2/13), bronchial stenosis with atelectasis (5/13), pulmonary nodules (3/13), lung consolidation (1/13), and lymph node enlargement with pleural effusion (2/13). Treatments included endotracheal stenting, endoscopic resection of tracheal and bronchial lesions, lung resection, and drug therapy with glucocorticoids, antineoplastic agents, or antibiotics. Four patients died of the disease within 1 year of diagnosis, 2 died of pneumonia at 3–4 years after original treatment, and the remaining patients are alive with follow-up ranging from 3 to 15 years.
CONCLUSIONS:
Isolated pulmonary amyloidosis is a rare disease with a relatively high mortality and its various manifestations make diagnosis challenging. Surgical resection of lesions and chemotherapy tend to be effective treatments.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.102186
PMCID: PMC3506106  PMID: 23189103
Amyloidosis; colchicines; mediastinum; melphalan; isolated pulmonary amyloidosis; respiratory system
3.  Novel approach for the management of sub-massive pulmonary embolism 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2012;7(3):157-161.
BACKGROUND:
Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction has been identified as a poor prognostic indicator in sub-massive pulmonary embolism (SPE). We hypothesized that using selective vasodilator agent is beneficial in improving RV function in patients with this condition.
METHODS:
We used inhaled prostacyclin analogue (Iloprost, Ventavis®) in five patients with SPE. Helical computerized tomography angiogram was confirmatory for pulmonary embolism and echocardiography was used to evaluate the RV status. All patients received inhaled Iloprost, 2.5 to 5 μg every 4 hours for 3 weeks.
RESULTS:
Patients were prospectively followed for 3 months. They were assessed at baseline before starting Iloprost treatment and at 3 days, 3 weeks, and 3 months after treatment. All patients showed significant improvement in their functional class, Borg dyspnea score, NT pro-BNP level, and echocardiographic parameters.
CONCLUSION:
In SPE, directing therapy toward decreasing pulmonary vascular resistance improves the associated pulmonary hemodynamic compromise and improves RV function.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.98850
PMCID: PMC3425049  PMID: 22924075
Iloprost; pulmonary hypertension; pulmonary vascular resistance; right ventricular function; sub-massive pulmonary embolism
4.  Pleural effusion following ventriculopleural shunt: Case reports and review of the literature 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2010;5(3):166-170.
Ventriculo-pleural shunt (VPLS) is an acceptable alternative in the management of hydrocephalus. Imbalance between the production and absorption of cerebrospinal fluid an lead to formation of pleural effusion in patient with VPLS and on occasion produce symptoms. Pleural effusion could be a transudate or a non-specific exudate. We report our experience with this modality in relation to formation of pleural effusion and review the literature to make recommendation for its management. Information related to patients’ demographics, smoking history, prior pulmonary and occupational history, indication, duration and complications of the VPLS and their management was gathered to substantiate current recommendation with our experience.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.65048
PMCID: PMC2930656  PMID: 20835312
Hydrocephalus; pleural effusion; ventriculo-pleural shunt
5.  Hypocalcemia in a Saudi intensive care unit 
Annals of Thoracic Medicine  2008;3(2):57-59.
OBJECTIVE:
Hypocalcemia has been a common abnormality in the West, seen in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). It has also been linked with disease severity. We undertook this study to determine the frequency of hypocalcemia in patients admitted to the intensive care unit.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
In a retrospective chart review from January 2004 till December 2004, patients admitted to our ICU were reviewed. Patients’ age, sex, diagnosis, acute physiology and chronic health score APACHE II and ionized calcium were recorded. Patients were divided into three groups based on disease severity as measured by APACHE II. Hypocalcemia was defined as ionized Ca level less than 1.18 mmol/L. Frequency was determined in each group and correlation of hypocalcemia with disease severity was explored.
RESULTS:
Hypocalcemia was seen in 22.2% in group A (APACHE II < 10), 40.4% in group B (APACHE II 10–19) and 53.9% in group C (APACHE II > 19). Hypocalcemia and disease severity (APACHE II scores) were negatively correlated (P = 0.02).
Mean ionized Ca levels in groups A, B and C were 1.22 mmol/L (±0.10), 1.19 mmol/L (±0.11) and 1.25 mmol/L (±0.24) respectively.
CONCLUSIONS:
Hypocalcemia is a common finding in critically ill patients. It is correlated with worsening disease severity. Mechanisms underlying hypocalcemia and the possible relationship of hypocalcemia with mortality need further consideration.
doi:10.4103/1817-1737.39638
PMCID: PMC2700460  PMID: 19561907
Hypocalcemia; intensive care

Results 1-5 (5)