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1.  Unusual manifestations of acute Q fever: autoimmune hemolytic anemia and tubulointerstitial nephritis 
Q fever is a worldwide zoonotic infection that caused by Coxiella burnetii, a strict intracellular bacterium. It may be manifested by some of the autoimmune events and is classified into acute and chronic forms. The most frequent clinical manifestation of acute form is a self-limited febrile illness which is associated with severe headache, muscle ache, arthralgia and cough. Meningoencephalitis, thyroiditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, mesenteric lymphadenopathy, hemolytic anemia, and nephritis are rare manifestations. Here we present a case of acute Q fever together with Coombs’ positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and tubulointerstitial nephritis treated with chlarithromycin, steroids and hemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of such rare manifestations of the disease.
doi:10.1186/1476-0711-11-14
PMCID: PMC3410774  PMID: 22607576
Q fever; Pneumonia; Autoimmune hemolytic anemia; Tubulointerstitial nephritis
2.  Assessment of the requisites of microbiology based infectious disease training under the pressure of consultation needs 
Background
Training of infectious disease (ID) specialists is structured on classical clinical microbiology training in Turkey and ID specialists work as clinical microbiologists at the same time. Hence, this study aimed to determine the clinical skills and knowledge required by clinical microbiologists.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was carried out between June 1, 2010 and September 15, 2010 in 32 ID departments in Turkey. Only patients hospitalized and followed up in the ID departments between January-June 2010 who required consultation with other disciplines were included.
Results
A total of 605 patients undergoing 1343 consultations were included, with pulmonology, neurology, cardiology, gastroenterology, nephrology, dermatology, haematology, and endocrinology being the most frequent consultation specialties. The consultation patterns were quite similar and were not affected by either the nature of infections or the critical clinical status of ID patients.
Conclusions
The results of our study show that certain internal medicine subdisciplines such as pulmonology, neurology and dermatology appear to be the principal clinical requisites in the training of ID specialists, rather than internal medicine as a whole.
doi:10.1186/1476-0711-10-38
PMCID: PMC3260124  PMID: 22177310
Infectious disease; clinical microbiology; training; consultation

Results 1-2 (2)