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1.  18F-DOPA PET with and without MRI fusion, a receiver operator characteristics comparison 
This study is a retrospective analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of FDOPA PET with MRI fusion to FDOPA PET without MRI fusion. Clinical FDOPA PET scans obtained between 2000 and 2008 at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics were assessed using measures derived from regions of interest (ROI) generated with fused MRI (fused group) and again with ROIs derived solely from PET data (non-fused groups). The ROIs were used to calculate ratios (Striatum/Occipital cortex, Striatum/Cerebellum) pertinent to Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathology. The clinical records were assessed for demographic data, follow-up length, and diagnosis. Receiver Operator Characteristics with area under the curve (AUC) measures were calculated and compared using confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. 27 patients had FDOPA PET with median clinical follow-up of 4 years. Of these, 17 patients had FDOPA PET with a fusible MR image. Seven of the 27 had a non-PD movement disorder. AUCs for the ratio measures ranged from 0.97-1.0 (fused), 0.73-0.83 (non-fused), and 0.63-0.82 (matched non-fused). The fused images had improved accuracy compared to the matched non-fused and all non-fused groups for the striatum to occipital group (p=0.04, p=0.03), while the striatum to cerebellum ratio had improvement over the non-fused all group (p=0.041). MR fusion to FDOPA PET improves the accuracy of at least some measures (Striatum/Occiput, Striatum/Cerebellum) in the diagnosis of PD.
PMCID: PMC3484423  PMID: 23145363
18F-Fluorodopa; positron emission tomography; image fusion; receiver operator characteristics; Parkinson’s
2.  Impact of expectation-maximization reconstruction iterations on the diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy with PET 
There is a well known tradeoff between image noise and image sharpness that is dependent on the number of iterations performed in ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction of PET data. We aim to evaluate the impact of this tradeoff on the sensitivity and specificity of 18F-FDG PET for the diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy. A retrospective blinded reader study was performed on two OSEM reconstructions, using either 2 or 5 iterations, of 32 18F-FDG PET studies acquired at our institution for the diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy. The sensitivity and specificity of each reconstruction for identifying patients who were ultimately determined to be surgical candidates was assessed using an ROC analysis. The sensitivity of each reconstruction for identifying patients who showed clinical improvement following surgery was also assessed. Our results showed no significant difference between the two reconstructions studied for either the sensitivity and specificity of 18F-FDG PET for predicting surgical candidacy, or its sensitivity for predicting positive surgical outcomes. This implies that the number of iterations performed during OSEM reconstruction will have little impact on a reader based interpretation of 18F-FDG PET scans acquired for the diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy, and can be determined by physician and institutional preference.
PMCID: PMC3477742  PMID: 23133820
18F-FDG PET; temporal lobe epilepsy; OSEM reconstruction; ROC analysis

Results 1-2 (2)