PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-6 (6)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Using Hemoglobin A1c to Derive Mean Blood Glucose in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients 
American journal of nephrology  2013;37(5):10.1159/000349929.
Background
Although hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has been widely used as a clinical assessment tool for outcome analyses related to glycemic control, the relationship between HbA1c and average blood glucose (BG) specific to peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients with diabetes has not been characterized. We sought to develop HbA1c-BG equation models for PD patients.
Methods
We examined associations between HbA1c and random serum BG values over time in a contemporary 5-year (2001–2006) cohort of DaVita PD patients with diabetes. We identified 850 patients (mean age 58±13 years old and 56% male) with 4,566 paired measurements of HbA1c and BG. The bootstrapping method was used to estimate average BG and corresponding HbA1c.
Results
Linear regression analyses yielded the following HbA1c-BG equations: (1) BG (mg/dL)=24.1 + 28.6 × HbA1c – 12.2 × Albumin (R2adj=0.454), (2) BG = 55.3+ 28.8 × HbA1c-10.2 × Albumin −3.3 × Hemoglobin (R2adj=0.457), (3) and BG =69.5 +28.7 × HbA1c- 10.1 × Albumin- 3.7 × Hemoglobin- 0.1 × Age+ Race/Ethnicity (−10.1 African-Americans, −5.4 other race/ethnicities; R2adj=0.457). All models showed greater explanatory power of BG variation than previously established HbA1c-BG equation models defined within non-PD cohorts (R2adj=0.446 for both the DCCT and the ADAG equations).
Conclusions
The association between HbA1c and BG in PD patients is different than that of patients with normal kidney function. Our analysis suggests that equations incorporating serum albumin and/or hemoglobin values better estimate the HbA1c-BG relationship in PD patients compared to equations using HbA1c alone.
doi:10.1159/000349929
PMCID: PMC3844668  PMID: 23594745
Hemoglobin A1c; blood glucose; equation model; glycemic control; albumin; hemoglobin; peritoneal dialysis; race
2.  Mortality Associated with Dose Response of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents in Hemodialysis versus Peritoneal Dialysis Patients 
American Journal of Nephrology  2012;35(2):198-208.
Background
Several studies have shown an association between erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) responsiveness and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In our present study, we examined the association between prescribed ESA dose and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) and hemodialysis (HD) patients. We hypothesized that PD patients received lower ESA dose for the same achieved hemoglobin compared to HD patients and that ESA dose-mortality associations were different between PD and HD patients.
Methods
We compared the prescribed doses of ESA between 139,103 HD and 10,527 PD patients treated in DaVita dialysis clinics from 7/2001 through 6/2006 using adjusted Poisson regression and examined mortality-predictability of prescribed ESA dose and ESA responsiveness index (ESA/hemoglobin) in PD and HD with follow-up through 6/2007 using Cox regression models.
Results
Poisson adjusted ratio of ESA dose of HD to PD was 3.6 (95% CI 3.5–3.7). In PD patients, adjusted all-cause death hazard ratios (HR) for ESA doses of 3,000–5,999, 6,000–8,999 and ≥9,000 U/week (reference <3,000 U/week) were 0.97 (0.87–1.07), 0.85 (0.76–0.95) and 1.08 (0.98–1.18), respectively; whereas in HD patients across commensurate ESA dose increments of 10,000–19,999, 20,000–29,999 and ≥30,000 U/week (reference <10,000 U/week) were 1.14 (1.11–1.17), 1.54 (1.50–1.58) and 2.15 (2.10–2.21), respectively. In PD and HD patients, the adjusted death HR of the 4th to 1st quartile of ESA responsiveness index were 1.14 (1.04–1.26) and 2.37 (2.31–2.43), respectively.
Conclusions
Between 2001 and 2006, most PD patients received substantially lower ESA dose for same achieved hemoglobin levels, and low ESA responsiveness was associated with higher mortality in both HD and PD patients.
doi:10.1159/000335685
PMCID: PMC3326284  PMID: 22286821
Anemia; Hemoglobin; Erythropoietin-stimulating agent therapy; Peritoneal dialysis; Hemodialysis; Mortality; Cardiovascular mortality
3.  Association of Cumulatively Low or High Serum Calcium Levels with Mortality in Long-Term Hemodialysis Patients 
American Journal of Nephrology  2010;32(5):403-413.
Background
The outcome-predictability of baseline and instantaneously changing serum calcium in hemodialysis patients has been examined. We investigated the mortality-predictability of time-averaged calcium values to reflect the ‘cumulative’ effect of calcium burden over time.
Methods
We employed a Cox model using up-to-5-year (7/2001–6/2006) time-averaged values to examine the mortality-predictability of cumulative serum calcium levels in 107,200 hemodialysis patients prior to the use of calcimimetics, but during the time where other calcium-lowering interventions, including lower dialysate calcium, were employed.
Results
Both low (<9.0 mg/dl) and high (>10.0 mg/dl) calcium levels were associated with increased mortality (reference: 9.0 to <9.5 mg/dl). Whereas mortality of hypercalcemia was consistent, hypocalcemia mortality was most prominent with higher serum phosphorus (>3.5 mg/dl) and PTH levels (>150 pg/ml). Higher paricalcitol doses shifted the calcium range associated with the greatest survival to the right, i.e. from 9.0 to <9.5 to 9.5 to <10.0 mg/dl. African-Americans exhibited the highest death hazard ratio of hypocalcemia <8.5 mg/dl, being 1.35 (95% CI: 1.22–1.49). Both a rise and drop in serum calcium over 6 months were associated with increased mortality compared to the stable group.
Conclusions
Whereas in hemodialysis patients cumulatively high or low calcium levels are associated with higher death risk, subtle but meaningful interactions with phosphorus, PTH, paricalcitol dose and race exist.
doi:10.1159/000319861
PMCID: PMC2941140  PMID: 20814200
Hypocalcemia; Hypercalcemia; Phosphorus; Hyperparathyroidism; Racial disparities; Mineral and bone disorder; Chronic kidney disease; Paricalcitol
4.  Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mortality of Hemodialysis Patients: Role of Dietary and Nutritional Status and Inflammation 
American Journal of Nephrology  2011;33(2):157-167.
Background
Racial/ethnic disparities prevail among hemodialysis patients. We hypothesized that significant differences exist between Black and non-Hispanic and Hispanic White hemodialysis patients in nutritional status, dietary intake and inflammation, and that they account for racial survival disparities.
Methods
In a 6-year (2001–2007) cohort of 799 hemodialysis patients, we compared diet and surrogates of nutritional-inflammatory status and their mortality-predictabilities between 279 Blacks and 520 Whites using matched and regression analyses and Cox with cubic splines.
Results
In age-, gender- and diabetes-matched analyses, Blacks had higher lean body mass and serum prealbumin, creatinine and homocysteine levels than Whites. In case-mix-adjusted analyses, dietary intakes in Blacks versus Whites were higher in energy (+293 ± 119 cal/day) and fat (+18 ± 5 g/day), but lower in fiber (−2.9 ± 1.3 g/day) than Whites. In both races, higher serum albumin, prealbumin and creatinine were associated with greater survival, whereas CRP and IL-6, but not TNF-α, were associated with increased mortality. The highest (vs. lowest) quartile of IL-6 was associated with a 2.4-fold (95% CI: 1.3–3.8) and 4.1-fold (2.2–7.2) higher death risk in Blacks and Whites, respectively.
Conclusions
Significant racial disparities exist in dietary, nutritional and inflammatory measures, which may contribute to hemodialysis outcome disparities. Testing race-specific dietary and/or anti-inflammatory interventions is indicated.
doi:10.1159/000323972
PMCID: PMC3202917  PMID: 21293117
Black race; Hispanic ethnicity; African Americans; Non-Hispanic White; Nutritional status; Inflammatory markers; Dietary intake; Survival
5.  Total and Individual Coronary Artery Calcium Scores as Independent Predictors of Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients 
American Journal of Nephrology  2010;31(5):419-425.
Many traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to vascular calcification among maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. It is not clear whether coronary artery calcification (CAC) delineates a higher mortality risk independent of known risk factors. We examined 6-year (10/2001–9/2007) survival of 166 MHD patients, aged 53 ± 13 years, with baseline CAC scores. Patients were grouped into four CAC groups: 0, 1–100, 101–400, and 400+. The 101–400 and 400+ groups were associated with a significantly higher adjusted risk of death than CAC 0 with hazard ratios (HR) 8.5 (95% CI: 1.1–48.1, p = 0.02) and 13.3 (95% CI: 1.3–65.1, p = 0.01), respectively, independent of demographics, comorbidity, lipids and other cardiovascular risks, surrogates of bone disease, nutritional and inflammatory markers and dialysis dose. Total CAC [HR 6.7 (1.1–21.5, p = 0.03)] followed by the presence of CAC in the left main [4.6 (2.2–9.8, p = 0.001)] and left anterior descending artery [4.3 (2.1–14.2, p = 0.001)] were strong independent predictors of mortality even after adjusting for above covariates. Total and vessel-specific CAC predict mortality in MHD patients independent of traditional and nontraditional risk factors.
doi:10.1159/000294405
PMCID: PMC2883846  PMID: 20389057
Chronic kidney disease; Coronary artery calcium; Dialysis; Inflammation; Phosphorus binder; Sevelamer; Death risk
6.  Association of Serum Total Iron-Binding Capacity and Its Changes Over Time with Nutritional and Clinical Outcomes in Hemodialysis Patients 
American Journal of Nephrology  2009;29(6):571-581.
Serum transferrin, estimated by total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), may be a marker of protein-energy wasting (PEW) in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. We hypothesized that low TIBC or its fall over time is associated with poor clinical outcomes. In 807 MHD patients in a prospective 5-year cohort, associations of TIBC and its changes over time with outcomes were examined after adjustment for case-mix and markers of iron stores and malnutrition-inflammation including serum interleukin-6, iron and ferritin. Patients with serum TIBC ≥250 mg/dl had higher body mass index, triceps and biceps skinfolds and mid-arm muscle circumference and higher serum levels of iron but lower ferritin and inflammatory markers. Some SF-36 quality of life (QoL) components were worse in the lowest and/or highest TIBC groups. Mortality was incrementally higher in lower TIBC levels (p-trend <0.001). Adjusted death hazard ratio was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.00–3.05, p = 0.05) for TIBC <150 compared to TIBC of 200–250 mg/dl. A fall in TIBC >20 mg/dl over 6 months was associated with a death hazard ratio of 1.57 (95% CI: 1.04–2.36, p = 0.03) compared to the stable TIBC group. Hence, low baseline serum TIBC is associated with iron deficiency, PEW, inflammation, poor QoL and mortality, and its decline over time is independently associated with increased death risk.
doi:10.1159/000191470
PMCID: PMC2818472  PMID: 19136818
Transferrin; Total iron-binding capacity; Chronic kidney disease; Hemodialysis; Protein-energy wasting

Results 1-6 (6)