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1.  Impact of Age, Race and Ethnicity on Dialysis Patient Survival and Kidney Transplantation Disparities 
American journal of nephrology  2014;39(3):183-194.
Prior studies show that African-American and Hispanic dialysis patients have lower mortality risk than whites. Recent age-stratified analyses suggest this survival advantage may be limited to younger age groups, but did not concurrently compare Hispanic, African-American, and white patients, nor account for differences in nutritional and inflammatory status as potential confounders. Minorities experience inequities in kidney transplantation access, but it is unknown whether these racial/ethnic disparities differ across age groups.
The associations between race/ethnicity with all-cause mortality and kidney transplantation were separately examined among 130,909 adult dialysis patients from a large national dialysis organization (entry period 2001-2006, follow-up through 2009) within 7 age categories using Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for case-mix and malnutrition and inflammatory surrogates.
African-Americans had similar mortality vs. whites in younger age groups (18-40 years), but decreased mortality in older age groups (>40 years). In contrast, Hispanics had lower mortality vs. whites across all ages. In sensitivity analyses using competing risk regression to account for differential kidney transplantation rates across racial/ethnic groups, the African-American survival advantage was limited to >60 year old age categories. African-Americans and Hispanics were less likely to undergo kidney transplantation from all donor types vs. whites across all ages, and these disparities were even more pronounced for living donor kidney transplantations (LDKT).
Hispanic dialysis patients have greater survival vs. whites across all ages; in African-Americans, this survival advantage is limited to patients >40 years old. Minorities are less likely to undergo kidney transplantation, particularly LDKT, across all ages.
PMCID: PMC4024458  PMID: 24556752
Race; Ethnicity; Disparities; Survival; Transplantation
2.  Using Hemoglobin A1c to Derive Mean Blood Glucose in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients 
American journal of nephrology  2013;37(5):10.1159/000349929.
Although hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has been widely used as a clinical assessment tool for outcome analyses related to glycemic control, the relationship between HbA1c and average blood glucose (BG) specific to peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients with diabetes has not been characterized. We sought to develop HbA1c-BG equation models for PD patients.
We examined associations between HbA1c and random serum BG values over time in a contemporary 5-year (2001–2006) cohort of DaVita PD patients with diabetes. We identified 850 patients (mean age 58±13 years old and 56% male) with 4,566 paired measurements of HbA1c and BG. The bootstrapping method was used to estimate average BG and corresponding HbA1c.
Linear regression analyses yielded the following HbA1c-BG equations: (1) BG (mg/dL)=24.1 + 28.6 × HbA1c – 12.2 × Albumin (R2adj=0.454), (2) BG = 55.3+ 28.8 × HbA1c-10.2 × Albumin −3.3 × Hemoglobin (R2adj=0.457), (3) and BG =69.5 +28.7 × HbA1c- 10.1 × Albumin- 3.7 × Hemoglobin- 0.1 × Age+ Race/Ethnicity (−10.1 African-Americans, −5.4 other race/ethnicities; R2adj=0.457). All models showed greater explanatory power of BG variation than previously established HbA1c-BG equation models defined within non-PD cohorts (R2adj=0.446 for both the DCCT and the ADAG equations).
The association between HbA1c and BG in PD patients is different than that of patients with normal kidney function. Our analysis suggests that equations incorporating serum albumin and/or hemoglobin values better estimate the HbA1c-BG relationship in PD patients compared to equations using HbA1c alone.
PMCID: PMC3844668  PMID: 23594745
Hemoglobin A1c; blood glucose; equation model; glycemic control; albumin; hemoglobin; peritoneal dialysis; race

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