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1.  Total and Individual Coronary Artery Calcium Scores as Independent Predictors of Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients 
American Journal of Nephrology  2010;31(5):419-425.
Many traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to vascular calcification among maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. It is not clear whether coronary artery calcification (CAC) delineates a higher mortality risk independent of known risk factors. We examined 6-year (10/2001–9/2007) survival of 166 MHD patients, aged 53 ± 13 years, with baseline CAC scores. Patients were grouped into four CAC groups: 0, 1–100, 101–400, and 400+. The 101–400 and 400+ groups were associated with a significantly higher adjusted risk of death than CAC 0 with hazard ratios (HR) 8.5 (95% CI: 1.1–48.1, p = 0.02) and 13.3 (95% CI: 1.3–65.1, p = 0.01), respectively, independent of demographics, comorbidity, lipids and other cardiovascular risks, surrogates of bone disease, nutritional and inflammatory markers and dialysis dose. Total CAC [HR 6.7 (1.1–21.5, p = 0.03)] followed by the presence of CAC in the left main [4.6 (2.2–9.8, p = 0.001)] and left anterior descending artery [4.3 (2.1–14.2, p = 0.001)] were strong independent predictors of mortality even after adjusting for above covariates. Total and vessel-specific CAC predict mortality in MHD patients independent of traditional and nontraditional risk factors.
doi:10.1159/000294405
PMCID: PMC2883846  PMID: 20389057
Chronic kidney disease; Coronary artery calcium; Dialysis; Inflammation; Phosphorus binder; Sevelamer; Death risk
2.  Effects of Sevelamer and Calcium-Based Phosphate Binders on Lipid and Inflammatory Markers in Hemodialysis Patients 
American Journal of Nephrology  2007;28(2):275-279.
Introduction
Cardiovascular disease accounts for almost half of all deaths in individuals with chronic kidney disease stage 5 despite advances in both dialysis treatment and cardiology. A combination of lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects along with avoidance of hypercalcemia should be taken into account when choosing phosphorus binders for maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients.
Methods
We examined the association of sevelamer versus calcium-based phosphorus binders with lipid profile, inflammatory markers including C-reactive protein (CRP), and mineral metabolism in MHD patients who participated in the Nutritional and Inflammatory Evaluation of Dialysis Patients (NIED) study from October 2001 to July 2005.
Results
Of the 787 MHD patients in the NIED study, 697 were on either sevelamer, a calcium-based binder, or both and eligible for this study. We compared the groups based on taking sevelamer monotherapy (n = 283) or calcium binder monotherapy (n = 266) for serum phosphate control. There were no differences between the groups on dialysis vintage. There were significant differences in age, serum calcium and phosphorus levels, as well as intact parathyroid hormone levels. Using a logistic regression models, the sevelamer group had a higher odds of serum CRP <10 mg/l [odds ratio (OR): 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02–1.11] and LDL cholesterol <70 mg/dl (OR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.19–1.47) when compared to the calcium binder group independent of age, vintage, body mass index, statin use or other variables.
Conclusion
The improvements in multiple surrogate markers of inflammation and lipids in the NIED study make sevelamer a promising therapy for treatment in MHD patients with high risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality.
doi:10.1159/000111061
PMCID: PMC2785908  PMID: 17992011
End-stage renal disease; Cardiac computed tomography; Coronary calcium; Phosphate binders

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