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1.  Rivastigmine in moderately severe-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease: Severe Impairment Battery factor analysis 
Introduction
The Severe Impairment Battery (SIB) is validated for assessing cognition in patients with severe dementia. The current analysis aimed to further investigate the cognitive efficacy of rivastigmine capsules, as assessed by SIB factor scores, in patients with moderately severe-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease (AD).
Methods
This was a retrospective analysis of a 26-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of oral rivastigmine conducted in Spain. Previously reported outcome measures included the full SIB. Current analyses examined calculated scores and effect sizes for the change from baseline at Week 26 on: newly defined SIB subscales (derived by a factor analysis of the 40 SIB items, using the PROC FACTOR function (SAS)); previously defined memory, language and praxis subscales (derived by previous analysis of the nine SIB domains); and the individual SIB items. Treatment differences were assessed.
Results
SIB data were provided by 104 rivastigmine-treated patients and 106 patients receiving placebo (Intent-To-Treat Last Observation Carried Forward population). Significantly less decline was observed on the previously defined memory and language subscales, and the newly defined working memory/memory subscale in rivastigmine-treated patients (all P < 0.05 versus placebo). Calculation of effect sizes demonstrated numerically greater efficacy of rivastigmine versus placebo on each of the subscales, and a broad range of SIB items; greatest effect sizes were observed on SIB items assessing the current month (effect size = 0.30) and digit span series (effect size = 0.33).
Conclusions
These data suggest the observed efficacy of rivastigmine in moderately severe-to-severe AD is likely a cumulative effect across a range of tasks. Rivastigmine demonstrates broad cognitive efficacy in this patient population.
doi:10.1186/alzrt229
PMCID: PMC3978681  PMID: 24351447
2.  Effects of donepezil 23 mg on Severe Impairment Battery domains in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease: evaluating the impact of baseline severity 
Introduction
The US Food and Drug Administration approved a 23 mg daily dose of donepezil for treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on outcomes from a large trial comparing the 23 mg/day dose with the standard 10 mg/day dose. Results from this study indicated that after 24 weeks, donepezil 23 mg/day provided significant cognitive benefits over donepezil 10 mg/day, measured using the Severe Impairment Battery (SIB). In the analyses reported herein, we further characterize the range of cognitive domains impacted by treatment with donepezil 23 mg/day.
Methods
A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from a 24-week, randomized, double-blind trial comparing donepezil 23 mg/day versus 10 mg/day in 1,467 patients with moderate to severe AD (baseline Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score 0 to 20). Changes from baseline to week 24 in the nine SIB domain scores were analyzed in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population (baseline MMSE 0 to 20), in patients with more severe baseline AD (MMSE 0 to 16), and in severity strata based on baseline MMSE scores (0 to 5, 6 to 10, 11 to 15, 16 to 20).
Results
In the ITT population, changes in six of the nine SIB domains favored donepezil 23 mg/day over donepezil 10 mg/day. LS mean treatment differences were significant for the language, visuospatial ability, and construction domains. In the more advanced cohort of patients (MMSE 0 to 16 at baseline), LS mean treatment differences were statistically significant favoring donepezil 23 mg/day in five of the nine domains: language, memory, visuospatial ability, attention, and construction. Descriptive analysis of LS mean changes in SIB domain scores in the four baseline severity strata showed variable patterns of response; overall, cognitive benefits of donepezil 23 mg/day were greatest in patients with MMSE scores of 0 to 15.
Conclusions
These results suggest that donepezil 23 mg/day provides benefits over 10 mg/day across a range of cognitive domains. The magnitude of benefit and domains impacted varied depending on the stage of AD; significant benefits with higher dose donepezil were most apparent at more advanced stages of AD and were most prominent in the language domain.
doi:10.1186/alzrt166
PMCID: PMC4055003  PMID: 23433097
3.  Validation of the relevant outcome scale for Alzheimer's disease: a novel multidomain assessment for daily medical practice 
Introduction
The Relevant Outcome Scale for Alzheimer's Disease (ROSA) is a new observer rating instrument recently developed for routine medical practice. The validity and reliability of ROSA as well as sensitivity to changes due to intervention were examined in an open-label, single-arm, multicenter clinical study in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Methods
The study enrolled 471 patients with a diagnosis of AD consistent with the criteria of the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disease and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association or with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Disorders criteria for dementia of Alzheimer's type. Following assessments of the ROSA and other standard assessments (Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - cognitive subscale, Severe Impairment Battery, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and Disability Assessment for Dementia), patients were treated with memantine for 12 weeks. Factor analysis of the baseline ROSA total scores was performed based on the principal components method using the varimax orthogonal rotational procedure. The psychometric analyses of the ROSA included internal consistency, test-retest reliability, inter-rater reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness to changes over time.
Results
All items showed adequate factor loadings and were retained in the final ROSA as Factor 1 (all items related to cognition, communication, function, quality of life and caregiver burden) and Factor 2 (all behavior items). The ROSA demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.93), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.93), and inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.91). The correlation coefficients between the ROSA and each of the validated scales ranged between 0.4 and 0.7, confirming the ROSA construct validity. Nonsubstantial floor and ceiling effects were found in middle and late disease stages, whereas a small ceiling effect was observed in the early stage. The ROSA responsiveness to change was high (responsiveness index ≥0.8) for all severity stages.
Conclusions
The ROSA is a valid and reliable instrument to aid medical practitioners in sensitively assessing AD-relevant symptoms over time in their clinical practice.
doi:10.1186/alzrt89
PMCID: PMC3218804  PMID: 21914212
4.  Review of Alzheimer's disease scales: is there a need for a new multi-domain scale for therapy evaluation in medical practice? 
Introduction
The present review of Alzheimer's disease (AD) rating scales aims to outline the need for a new rating scale to be used in routine clinical practice for long-term medical care of AD patients. An ideal scale would be: 1) practical, easy and quick to administer for an experienced clinician; 2) validated for AD; 3) multi-domain: covering the AD-relevant areas of cognition, activities of daily living, behavior, communication/social interaction, and quality of life; 4) applicable to all AD severity stages; 5) able to monitor disease progression; and 6) sensitive to measure therapy effects.
Methods
The National Library of Medicines' MEDLINE database was searched for the years 1981 to September 2008, using a set of keywords aiming to select instruments which cover at least some of the requirements for an ideal practical AD scale for therapy evaluation. Measures for AD staging and screening tests were not considered for review.
Results
Of 1,902 articles resulting from the literature search, 68 relevant AD scales were identified. Most of them were scales that predominantly measure the severity of major dysfunctions in particular AD domains. Only five scales met some of the requirements for a practical multi-domain AD scale, but did not possess all required characteristics.
Conclusions
Despite the multitude of AD scales for various purposes, there remains a need for a new multi-domain and easy to administer AD scale for assessment of disease progression and response to therapy in daily medical practice.
doi:10.1186/alzrt48
PMCID: PMC2949590  PMID: 20796301

Results 1-4 (4)