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1.  Association of lung function with physical, mental and cognitive function in early old age 
Age  2010;33(3):385-392.
Lung function predicts mortality; whether it is associated with functional status in the general population remains unclear. This study examined the association of lung function with multiple measures of functioning in early old age. Data are drawn from the Whitehall II study; data on lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, height FEV1), walking speed (2.44 m), cognitive function (memory and reasoning) and self-reported physical and mental functioning (SF-36) were available on 4,443 individuals, aged 50–74 years. In models adjusted for age, 1 standard deviation (SD) higher height-adjusted FEV1 was associated with greater walking speed (beta = 0.16, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.19), memory (beta = 0.09, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.12), reasoning (beta = 0.16, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.19) and self-reported physical functioning (beta = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.16). Socio-demographic measures, health behaviours (smoking, alcohol, physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption), body mass index (BMI) and chronic conditions explained two-thirds of the association with walking speed and self-assessed physical functioning and over 80% of the association with cognitive function. Our results suggest that lung function is a good ‘summary’ measure of overall functioning in early old age.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9189-x
PMCID: PMC3168608  PMID: 20878489
Ageing; Lung function; Cognitive function; Physical function
2.  Association of lung function with physical, mental and cognitive function in early old age 
Age  2010;33(3):385-392.
Lung function predicts mortality, whether it is associated with functional status in the general population remains unclear. This study examined the association of lung function with multiple measures of functioning in early old age. Data are drawn from the Whitehall II study; data on lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second, height FEV1), walking speed (over 2.44 m), cognitive function (memory and reasoning), and self-reported physical and mental functioning (SF-36) were available on 4443 individuals, aged 50–74 years. In models adjusted for age, one standard deviation (SD) higher height-adjusted FEV1 was associated with greater walking speed (beta=0.16, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.19), memory (beta=0.09, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.12), reasoning (beta=0.16, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.19), and self-reported physical functioning (beta=0.13, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.16). Socio-demographic measures, health behaviours (smoking, alcohol, physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption), BMI and chronic conditions explained two-thirds of the association with walking speed and self-assessed physical functioning and over 80% of the association with cognitive function. Our results suggest that lung function is a good “summary” measure of overall functioning in early old age.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9189-x
PMCID: PMC3168608  PMID: 20878489
Aged; Aging; physiology; psychology; Cognition; physiology; Female; Health Status; Humans; Lung; physiology; Male; Middle Aged; Spirometry; Walking; physiology; ageing; lung function; cognitive function; physical function
3.  The importance of cognitive ageing for understanding dementia 
Age  2010;32(4):509-512.
A third of those over 80 years of age are likely to have dementia, the lack of a cure requires efforts directed at prevention and delaying the age of onset. We argue here for the importance of understanding the cognitive ageing process, seen as the decline in various cognitive functions from adulthood to old age. The impact of age on cognitive function is heterogeneous and the identification of risk factors associated with adverse cognitive ageing profiles would allow well-targeted interventions, behavioural or pharmacological, to delay and reduce the population burden of dementia. A shift away from binary outcomes such as dementia assessed at one point in time in elderly populations to research on cognitive ageing using repeated measures of cognitive function and starting earlier in the life course would allow the sources of variability in ageing to be better understood.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9147-7
PMCID: PMC2980594  PMID: 20454932
Alzheimer’s disease; Dementia; Cognitive ageing
4.  The importance of cognitive aging for understanding dementia 
Age  2010;32(4):509-512.
A third of those over 80 years of age are likely to have dementia, the lack of a cure requires efforts directed at prevention and delaying the age of onset. We argue here for the importance of understanding the cognitive ageing process, seen as the decline in various cognitive functions from adulthood to old age. The impact of age on cognitive function is heterogeneous and the identification of risk factors associated with adverse cognitive ageing profiles would allow well targeted interventions, behavioural or pharmacological, to delay and reduce the population burden of dementia. A shift away from binary outcomes such as dementia assessed at one point in time in elderly populations to research on cognitive ageing using repeated measures of cognitive function and staring earlier in the lifecourse would allow the sources of variability in ageing to be better understood.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9147-7
PMCID: PMC2980594  PMID: 20454932
Aging; Alzheimer Disease; epidemiology; physiopathology; Cognition; Dementia; diagnosis; epidemiology; physiopathology; prevention & control; therapy; France; epidemiology; Humans; Prevalence; Risk Factors; World Health Organization
5.  Human muscle satellite cells show age-related differential expression of S100B protein and RAGE 
Age  2010;33(4):523-541.
During aging, skeletal muscles show reduced mass and functional capacity largely due to loss of the regenerative ability of satellite cells (SCs), the quiescent stem cells located beneath the basal lamina surrounding each myofiber. While both the external environment and intrinsic properties of SCs appear to contribute to the age-related SC deficiency, the latter ones have been poorly investigated especially in humans. In the present work, we analyzed several parameters of SCs derived from biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle from healthy non-trained young (28.7 ± 5.9 years; n = 10) and aged (77.3 ± 6.4 years; n = 11) people. Compared with young SCs, aged SCs showed impaired differentiation when cultured in differentiation medium, and exhibited the following: (1) reduced proliferation; (2) higher expression levels of S100B, a negative regulator of myoblast differentiation; (3) undetectable levels in growth medium of full-length RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products), a multiligand receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, the engagement of which enhances myoblast differentiation; and (4) lower expression levels of the transcription factors, MyoD and Pax7. Also, either overexpression of full-length RAGE or knockdown of S100B in aged SCs resulted in enhanced differentiation, while overexpression of either a non-transducing mutant of RAGE (RAGEΔcyto) or S100B in young SCs resulted in reduced differentiation compared with controls. Moreover, while aged SCs maintained the ability to respond to mitogenic factors (e.g., bFGF and S100B), they were no longer able to secrete these factors, unlike young SCs. These data support a role for intrinsic factors, besides the extracellular environment in the defective SC function in aged skeletal muscles.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9197-x
PMCID: PMC3220399  PMID: 21140295
Muscle satellite cells; Aging; Proliferation; Differentiation; S100B; RAGE
6.  Postprandial antioxidant effect of the Mediterranean diet supplemented with coenzyme Q10 in elderly men and women 
Age  2010;33(4):579-590.
Postprandial oxidative stress is characterized by an increased susceptibility of the organism towards oxidative damage after consumption of a meal rich in lipids and/or carbohydrates. We have investigated whether the quality of dietary fat alters postprandial cellular oxidative stress and whether the supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) lowers postprandial oxidative stress in an elderly population. In this randomized crossover study, 20 participants were assigned to receive three isocaloric diets for periods of 4 week each: (1) Mediterranean diet supplemented with CoQ (Med+CoQ diet), (2) Mediterranean diet (Med diet), and (3) saturated fatty acid-rich diet (SFA diet). After a 12-h fast, the volunteers consumed a breakfast with a fat composition similar to that consumed in each of the diets. CoQ, lipid peroxides (LPO), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), protein carbonyl (PC), total nitrite, nitrotyrosine plasma levels, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and ischemic reactive hyperaemia (IRH) were determined. Med diet produced a lower postprandial GPx activity and a lower decrease in total nitrite level compared to the SFA diet. Med and Med+CoQ diets induced a higher postprandial increase in IRH and a lower postprandial LPO, oxLDL, and nitrotyrosine plasma levels than the SFA diet. Moreover, the Med+CoQ diet produced a lower postprandial decrease in total nitrite and a greater decrease in PC levels compared to the other two diets and lower SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the SFA diet.
In conclusion, Med diet reduces postprandial oxidative stress by reducing processes of cellular oxidation and increases the action of the antioxidant system in elderly persons and the administration of CoQ further improves this redox balance.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9199-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9199-8
PMCID: PMC3220401  PMID: 21170684
Aging; Mediterranean diet; Coenzyme Q10; Oxidative stress; Postprandial phase
7.  Melatonin is able to delay endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in leukocytes from elderly humans 
Age  2010;33(4):497-507.
The mechanisms regulating neutrophil apoptosis are basically unaffected by the aging process. However, a significant impairment of cell survival occurs in elderly individuals following neutrophil challenge with pro-inflammatory stimuli, such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The goal of the present study was to prove the effects of melatonin supplementation on apoptosis induced by calcium signaling in human leukocytes from elderly volunteers. Treatments with the specific inhibitor of cytosolic calcium re-uptake, thapsigargin, and/or the calcium mobilizing agonist, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, and DNA fragmentation in leukocytes from both young and elderly volunteers, although such effects were much more evident in aged leukocytes. Importantly, melatonin treatment substantially preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, reversed caspase activation, reduced PS exposure and forestalled DNA fragmentation in leukocytes from both age groups. In conclusion, melatonin is able to delay endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in aged leukocytes and may counteract, at the cellular level, age-related degenerative phenomena linked to oxidative stress.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9194-0
PMCID: PMC3220404  PMID: 21086186
Melatonin; Aging; Leukocytes; Apoptosis
8.  Influence of two methods of dietary restriction on life history features and aging of the cricket Acheta domesticus 
Age  2010;33(4):509-522.
Studying aging is constrained using vertebrates by their longevity, size, ethical restrictions, and expense. The key insect model, Drosophila melanogaster, is holometabolous. Larvae feed on yeast in moist media and adults sponge food. Most aging studies are restricted to adults. Another key model, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, feeds on bacteria in moist media. For either invertebrate refreshing test materials, preventing degradation and obtaining accurate dosing are difficult even with synthetic media. The cricket Acheta domesticus has a short lifespan (∼120 days at 30°C) and is omnivorous. Age-matched cohorts are easily obtained from eggs. The life cycle is hemimetabolous and nymphs eat the same foods as adults. Growth is easily monitored, gender can be differentiated before maturity, and maturation is indicated by wings and mature genitalia. Crickets can be reared in large numbers at low cost. Test materials can be mixed into food and ingestion rates or mass budgets easily assessed. Here, we validate the cricket as a model of aging by testing two fundamental methods of restricting food intake: time-restricted access to food and dietary dilution. Growth, maturation, survivorship, and longevity varied with treatments and genders. Intermittent feeding (which is ineffective in flies) significantly extended longevity of crickets. Dietary dilution also extended longevity via remarkable prolongation of the juvenile period.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9195-z
PMCID: PMC3220405  PMID: 21120631
Acheta domesticus; Aging; Dietary restriction; Growth; Maturation; Compensation
9.  Tight binding of proteins to membranes from older human cells 
Age  2010;33(4):543-554.
The lens is an ideal model system for the study of macromolecular aging and its consequences for cellular function, since there is no turnover of lens fibre cells. To examine biochemical processes that take place in the lens and that may also occur in other long-lived cells, membranes were isolated from defined regions of human lenses that are synthesised at different times during life, and assayed for the presence of tightly bound cytosolic proteins using quantitative iTRAQ proteomics technology. A majority of lens beta crystallins and all gamma crystallins became increasingly membrane bound with age, however, the chaperone proteins alpha A and alpha B crystallin, as well as the thermally-stable protein, βB2 crystallin, did not. Other proteins such as brain-associated signal protein 1 and paralemmin 1 became less tightly bound in the older regions of the lens. It is evident that protein–membrane interactions change significantly with age. Selected proteins that were formerly cytosolic become increasingly tightly bound to cell membranes with age and are not removed even by treatment with 7 M urea. It is likely that such processes reflect polypeptide denaturation over time and the untoward binding of proteins to membranes may alter membrane properties and contribute to impairment of communication between older cells.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9198-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9198-9
PMCID: PMC3220407  PMID: 21181282
Human lens; Aging; Protein denaturation; Membrane binding; Lens barrier
10.  Middle age aggravates myocardial ischemia through surprising upholding of complex II activity, oxidative stress, and reduced coronary perfusion 
Age  2010;33(3):321-336.
Aging compromises restoration of the cardiac mechanical function during reperfusion. We hypothesized that this was due to an ampler release of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study aimed at characterising ex vivo the mitochondrial ROS release during reperfusion in isolated perfused hearts of middle-aged rats. Causes and consequences on myocardial function of the observed changes were then evaluated. The hearts of rats aged 10- or 52-week old were subjected to global ischemia followed by reperfusion. Mechanical function was monitored throughout the entire procedure. Activities of the respiratory chain complexes and the ratio of aconitase to fumarase activities were determined before ischemia and at the end of reperfusion. H2O2 release was also evaluated in isolated mitochondria. During ischemia, middle-aged hearts displayed a delayed contracture, suggesting a maintained ATP production but also an increased metabolic proton production. Restoration of the mechanical function during reperfusion was however reduced in the middle-aged hearts, due to lower recovery of the coronary flow associated with higher mitochondrial oxidative stress indicated by the aconitase to fumarase ratio in the cardiac tissues. Surprisingly, activity of the respiratory chain complex II was better maintained in the hearts of middle-aged animals, probably because of an enhanced preservation of its membrane lipid environment. This can explain the higher mitochondrial oxidative stress observed in these conditions, since cardiac mitochondria produce much more H2O2 when they oxidize FADH2-linked substrates than when they use NADH-linked substrates. In conclusion, the lower restoration of the cardiac mechanical activity during reperfusion in the middle-aged hearts was due to an impaired recovery of the coronary flow and an insufficient oxygen supply. The deterioration of the coronary perfusion was explained by an increased mitochondrial ROS release related to the preservation of complex II activity during reperfusion.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9186-0
PMCID: PMC3168590  PMID: 20878490
Myocardial aging; Ischemia; Oxidative stress; Respiratory chain complexes
11.  Carotid body function in aged rats: responses to hypoxia, ischemia, dopamine, and adenosine 
Age  2010;33(3):337-350.
The carotid body (CB) is the main arterial chemoreceptor with a low threshold to hypoxia. CB activity is augmented by A2-adenosine receptors stimulation and attenuated by D2-dopamine receptors. The effect of aging on ventilatory responses mediated by the CB to hypoxia, ischemia, and to adenosine and dopamine administration is almost unknown. This study aims to investigate the ventilatory response to ischemia and to adenosine, dopamine, and their antagonists in old rats, as well as the effect of hypoxia on adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in the aged CB. In vivo experiments were performed on young and aged rats anesthetized with pentobarbitone and breathing spontaneously. CB ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid occlusions. cAMP content was measured in CB incubated with different oxygen concentrations. Hyperoxia caused a decrease in cAMP in the CB at all ages, but no differences were found between normoxia and hypoxia or between young and old animals. The endogenous dopaminergic inhibitory tonus is slightly reduced. However, both the ventilation decrease caused by exogenous dopamine and the increase mediated by A2A-adenosine receptors are not impaired in aged animals. The bradycardia induced by adenosine is attenuated in old rats. The CB’s peripheral control of ventilation is preserved during aging. Concerns have also arisen regarding the clinical usage of adenosine to revert supraventricular tachycardia and the use of dopamine in critical care situations involving elderly people.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9187-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9187-z
PMCID: PMC3168591  PMID: 20922488
Aging; Peripheral chemoreceptors; Ventilation; Domperidone; cAMP; Adenosine A2A receptors
12.  Prevention of bone resorption by intake of phytoestrogens in postmenopausal women: a meta-analysis 
Age  2010;33(3):421-431.
Phytoestrogens as selective estrogen receptor modulators like compounds may consider as a therapeutic option in osteoporosis. In this regard, the effect of phytoestrogens on bone biomarkers was examined in several trials which their results are controversial. We aimed this meta-analysis to evaluate the net effect of phytoestrogens on bone markers. A thorough search was conducted from 2000 to 2010 in English articles. All randomized clinical trials were reviewed, and finally, 11 eligible randomized clinical trials were selected for meta-analysis. Totally 1,252 postmenopausal women were enrolled in the study by considering the changes of pyridinoline (Pyd), desoxypyridinoline (Dpyd), bone alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin concentrations in urine and serum after phytoestrogens consumption. The urine Pyd and Dpyd levels decreased significantly in phytoestrogens consumers. Effect size and effect size for weighted mean difference of urine Pyd levels showed −1.229171 (95% confidence interval (CI) = −1.927639 to −0.530703) and −9.780623 (95% CI = −14.240401 to −5.320845), respectively, a significant results in comparison to control group and significant results for Dpyd −0.520132 (95% CI = −0.871988 to −0.168275) and −0.818582 (95% CI = −1.247758 to −0.389407), respectively. Meta-analysis indicates that phytoestrogens intake can prevent bone resorption, but its benefits on bone formation are not significant. This favorable effect was observed in low doses and in at least 3 weeks of phytoestrogens intake.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9180-6
PMCID: PMC3168592  PMID: 20827510
Phytoestrogens; Soy isoflavone; Meta-analysis; Pyridinoline; Desoxypyridinoline; Bone-specific alkaline posphatase; Osteoporosis; Oxidative stress
13.  Neurobiology of the aging dog 
Age  2010;33(3):485-496.
Aged canines naturally accumulate several types of neuropathology that may have links to cognitive decline. On a gross level, significant cortical atrophy occurs with age along with an increase in ventricular volume based on magnetic resonance imaging studies. Microscopically, there is evidence of select neuron loss and reduced neurogenesis in the hippocampus of aged dogs, an area critical for intact learning and memory. The cause of neuronal loss and dysfunction may be related to the progressive accumulation of toxic proteins, oxidative damage, cerebrovascular pathology, and changes in gene expression. For example, aged dogs naturally accumulate human-type beta-amyloid peptide, a protein critically involved with the development of Alzheimer’s disease in humans. Further, oxidative damage to proteins, DNA/RNA and lipids occurs with age in dogs. Although less well explored in the aged canine brain, neuron loss, and cerebrovascular pathology observed with age are similar to human brain aging and may also be linked to cognitive decline. Interestingly, the prefrontal cortex appears to be particularly vulnerable early in the aging process in dogs and this may be reflected in dysfunction in specific cognitive domains with age.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9183-3
PMCID: PMC3168593  PMID: 20845082
Atrophy; Beagle; Beta-amyloid; Neurogenesis; Oxidative damage
14.  Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotypes and disability in hospitalized older patients 
Age  2010;33(3):409-419.
The association between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotypes and functional decline in older adults remains controversial. To assess if ACE gene variations influences functional abilities at older age, the present study explored the association between the common ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and disability measured with activities of daily living (ADL) in hospitalized older patients. We analyzed the frequency of the ACE genotypes (I/I, I/D, and D/D) in a population of 2,128 hospitalized older patients divided according to presence or absence of ADL disability. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for possible confounding factors, identified an association between the I/I genotype with ADL disability (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.04–2.29). This association was significant in men (OR = 2.01, 95% CI 1.07–3.78), but not in women (OR = 1.36, 95% CI 0.82–2.25). These results suggested a possible role of the ACE polymorphism as a genetic marker for ADL disability in hospitalized older patients.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9192-2
PMCID: PMC3168594  PMID: 21076879
Angiotensin-converting enzyme; Disability; Aging; Hospitalized patients
15.  Age-related cataract in dogs: a biomarker for life span and its relation to body size 
Age  2010;33(3):451-460.
Clinical data from 72 dog breeds of varying size and life expectancy were grouped according to breed body mass and tested for prevalence at ages 4 to 5, ages 7 to 10, and lifetime incidence of non-hereditary, age-related cataract (ARC). The incidence of ARC was found to be directly related to the relative life expectancies in the breed groups: The smallest dog breeds had a lower ARC prevalence between ages 4 and 5 than mid-size breeds and these, in turn, a lower prevalence than the giant breeds. A similar sequence was evident for ages 7 to 10 and for overall lifetime incidence of ARC. These differences became more significant when comparing small and giant breeds only. We could also confirm the inverse relationship between body size and life expectancy in these same sets of dog breeds. Our results show that body size, life expectancy, and ARC incidence are interrelated in dogs. Given that ARC has been shown to be at least partially caused by oxidative damage to lens epithelial cells and the internal lens, we suggest that it can be considered not only as a general biomarker for life expectancy in the canine and possibly other species, but also for the systemic damages produced by reactive oxygen species. This suggests new approaches to examine the gene expression pathways affecting the above-noted linkages.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9158-4
PMCID: PMC3168595  PMID: 20607428
Dog; Age-related cataract; Breeds; Size; Life span
16.  Advanced glycation end products in diabetic and non-diabetic human subjects suffering from cataract 
Age  2010;33(3):377-384.
Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play a pivotal role in loss of lens transparency, i.e., cataract. AGEs formation occurs as a result of sequential glycation and oxidation reaction between reducing sugars and protein. AGEs production takes place throughout the normal aging process but its accumulation is found to be more rapid in diabetic patients. In this study, we quantified AGEs and N-(carboxyethyl) lysine (CEL) in human cataractous lenses from non-diabetic (n = 50) and diabetic patients (n = 50) using ELISA. We observed significantly higher (p < 0.001) levels of lens AGEs and CEL in diabetic patients with cataract as compared with their respective controls. The presence of AGEs and CEL was also determined by western blotting and immuno-histochemical analysis. Furthermore, isolated β-crystallin from cataractous lenses of non-diabetic and diabetic patients was incubated with different sugars to evaluate the extent of glycation in a time dependent manner. Our data indicated more pronounced glycation in patients suffering from diabetes as compared to non-diabetics subjects demonstrating the need to focus on developing normoglycemic approaches. Such studies may provide an insight in developing therapeutic strategies and may have clinical implications.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9177-1
PMCID: PMC3168597  PMID: 20842534
AGEs; Cataract; Diabetes; CEL; Non-enzymatic glycation
17.  Aging and movement errors when lifting and lowering light loads 
Age  2010;33(3):393-407.
The purpose was to determine the influence of movement variability and level of muscle activation on the accuracy of targeted movements performed with the index finger by young and older adults. Twelve young (27.4 ± 4.4 years) and 12 older adults (74.5 ± 8.9 years) attempted to match the end position of an index finger movement to a target position when lifting and lowering a light load (10% of the maximum). Visual feedback was provided after each trial. Movement error was calculated as the absolute distance from the target. Movement variability was quantified as the standard deviation of finger acceleration and the variability of end position across trials. The EMG activity of first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and second palmar interosseus (SPI) muscles was measured with intramuscular electrodes. Older adults exhibited greater spatial and temporal errors and greater variability in finger acceleration and end position during both the lifting and lowering tasks. Older adults lifted the load by activating FDI less but SPI the same as young adults, whereas they lowered the load by activating SPI less and FDI the same as young adults. In addition, older adults exhibited lower variability across trials in SPI activation when lifting the load and lower variability for FDI activation when lowering the load. The findings demonstrate that the decrease in spatial and temporal accuracy observed in older adults when lifting and lowering a light load to a target position was due to greater movement variability and differences in antagonistic muscle activity.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9190-4
PMCID: PMC3168598  PMID: 20945163
Motor output variability; Older adults; Movement control; EMG; Muscle synergy; Antagonist muscles
18.  Remodeling of heterochromatin induced by heavy metals in extreme old age 
Age  2010;33(3):433-438.
The levels of chromosome instability and heat absorption of chromatin have been studied in cultured lymphocytes derived from blood of 80–93- and 18–30-year-old individuals, under the effect of heavy metal Cu(II) and Cd(II) salts. The analysis of the results obtained indicates that 50 μM Cu(II) induced a significantly higher level of cells with chromosome aberrations in old donors (13.8 ± 1.5% vs control, 3.8 ± 1.7%), whereas treatment with 100 μM Cd(II) did not induce any changes in the background index. Analysis of the lymphocyte melting curves showed that Cu(II) ions caused more effective condensation of heterochromatin in old healthy individuals compared with young donors, which was expressed by the increase of the Tm of elderly chromatin by ~3°C compared with the norm. Treatment of lymphocyte chromatin of old individuals with 100 μM Cd(II) caused decondensation (deheterochromatinization) of both the facultative and constitutive domains of heterochromatin. The deheterochromatinization Tm was decreased by ~3–3.5°C compared with the Tm observed for young individuals. Thus, the chromatin of cultured lymphocytes from the old-aged individuals underwent modification under the influence of copper and cadmium salts. Cu(II) caused additional heterochromatinization of heterochromatin, and Cd(II) caused deheterochromatinization of facultative and constitutive heterochromatin. Our data may be important as new information on the remodeling of constitutive and facultative heterochromatin induced by heavy metals in aging, aging pathology, and pathology linked with metal ions.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9185-1
PMCID: PMC3168599  PMID: 20865337
Aberration; Aging; Cadmium; Chromosome; Copper; Heterochromatin; Heterochromatinization; Microcalorimetry
19.  Aging-related kidney damage is associated with a decrease in klotho expression and an increase in superoxide production 
Age  2010;33(3):261-274.
The purpose of this study was to determine changes in klotho, endothelin (ET) receptors, and superoxide production in kidneys of aged rats and whether these changes are exacerbated in aged rats with cognitive impairment. Twenty aged rats (male, 27 months) were divided into an Old Impaired group (n = 9) and an Old Intact group (n = 11) according to a cognitive function test. A group of 12-month-old rats (n = 10) was used as a Young Intact group. Serum creatinine was increased significantly in the Old Impaired group, suggesting impaired renal function. Aged rats showed glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitialfibrosis. These pathological changes were markedly aggravated in the old cognitively impaired than in the old cognitively intact animals. Notably, aged rats demonstrated a significant decrease in klotho protein expression in renal cortex and medulla. Protein expression of IL-6, Nox2, ETa receptors and superoxide production were increased whereas mitochondrial SOD (MnSOD) and ETb receptors expression were decreased in kidneys of the aged rats. Interestingly, these changes were more pronounced in the old impaired than in the old intact rats. In conclusion, the aging-related kidney damage was exacerbated in aged rats with cognitive impairment. Klotho, ETB, and MnSOD were downregulated but ETa, IL-6, Nox2, and superoxide production were upregulated in the aging-related kidney damage. These changes were more pronounced in rats with cognitive impairment.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9176-2
PMCID: PMC3168600  PMID: 20830528
Aging; Klotho; Glomerusclerosis; ET receptor; Superoxide; Interleukin-6
20.  Caloric restriction does not alter effects of aging in cardiac side population cells 
Age  2010;33(3):351-361.
The aged heart displays a loss of cardiomyocyte number and function, possibly due to the senescence and decreased regenerative potential that has been observed in some cardiac progenitor cells. An important cardiac progenitor that has not been studied in the context of aging is the cardiac side population (CSP) cell. To address this, flow cytometry-assisted cell sorting was used to isolate CSP cells from adult (6–10 months old) and aged (24–32 months old) C57Bl/6 mice that were fed either a control diet or an anti-aging diet (caloric restriction, CR). Aging caused a 2.3-fold increase in the total number of CSP cells and a 3.2-fold increase in the cardiomyogenic sca1+/CD31− subpopulation. Aging did not affect markers of proliferation or senescence, including telomerase activity and expression of cell cycle genes, in sca1+/CD31− CSP cells. In contrast, the aged cells had reduced expression of genes associated with differentiation, including smooth muscle actin and cardiac muscle actin (5.1- and 3.2-fold, respectively). None of these age effects were altered by CR diet. Therefore, it appears that the manner in which CSP cells age is distinct from the aging of post-mitotic tissue (and perhaps other progenitor cells) that can often be attenuated by CR.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9188-y
PMCID: PMC3168602  PMID: 20922487
Adult stem cell; Cardiac regeneration; CR; CSP; Sca1; CD31
21.  Hippocampal M1 receptor function associated with spatial learning and memory in aged female rhesus macaques 
Age  2010;33(3):309-320.
Of the acetylcholine muscarinic receptors, the type 1 (M1) and type 2 (M2) receptors are expressed at the highest levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus, brain regions important for cognition. As equivocal findings of age-related changes of M1 and M2 in the nonhuman primate brain have been reported, we first assessed age-related changes in M1 and M2 in the PFC and hippocampus using saturation binding assays. Maximum M1 receptor binding, but not affinity of M1 receptor binding, decreased with age. In contrast, the affinity of M2 receptor binding, but not maximum M2 receptor binding, increased with age. To determine if in the elderly cognitive performance is associated with M1 or M2 function, we assessed muscarinic function in elderly female rhesus macaques in vivo using a scopolamine challenge pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging and in vitro using saturation binding assays. Based on their performance in a spatial maze, the animals were classified as good spatial performers (GSP) or poor spatial performers (PSP). In the hippocampus, but not PFC, the GSP group showed a greater change in T2*-weighted signal intensity after scopolamine challenge than the PSP group. The maximum M1 receptor binding and receptor binding affinity was greater in the GSP than the PSP group, but no group difference was found in M2 receptor binding. Parameters of circadian activity positively correlated with the difference in T2*-weighted signal intensity before and after the challenge, the maximum M1 receptor binding, and the M1 receptor binding affinity. Thus, while in rhesus macaques, there are age-related decreases in M1 and M2 receptor binding, in aged females, hippocampal M1, but not M2, receptor function is associated with spatial learning and memory and circadian activity.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9184-2
PMCID: PMC3168603  PMID: 20890730
M1 receptor; Scopolamine phMRI; Spatial maze
22.  Connecting serum IGF-1, body size, and age in the domestic dog 
Age  2010;33(3):475-483.
Many investigations in recent years have targeted understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of aging. Collectively, genetic factors and biological mechanisms appear to influence longevity in general and specifically; reduction of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling cascade has extended life span in diverse species. Genetic alteration of mammals for life extension indicates correlation to serum IGF-1 levels in mice, and IGF-1 levels have been demonstrated as a physiological predictor of frailty with aging in man. Longevity and aging data in the dog offer a close measure of the natural multifactorial longevity interactions of genetic influence, IGF-1 signaling, and environmental factors such as exposure, exercise, and lifestyle. The absence of genetic alteration more closely represents the human longevity status, and the unique species structure of the canine facilitates analyses not possible in other species. These investigations aimed to measure serum IGF-1 in numerous purebred and mixed-breed dogs of variable size and longevity in comparison to age, gender, and spay/neuter differences. The primary objective of this investigation was to determine plasma IGF-1 levels in the adult dog, including a wide range of breeds and adult body weight. The sample set includes animals ranging from just a few months of age through 204 months and ranging in size from 5 to 160 lb. Four groups were evaluated for serum IGF-1 levels, including intact and neutered males, and intact and spayed females. IGF-1 loss over time, as a function of age, decreases in all groups with significant differences between males and females. The relationship between IGF-1 and weight differs depending upon spay/neuter status, but there is an overall increase in IGF-1 levels with increasing weight. The data, currently being interrogated further for delineation of IGF-1 receptor variants and sex differences, are being collected longitudinally and explored for longevity associations previously unavailable in non-genetically modified mammals.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9182-4
PMCID: PMC3168604  PMID: 20865338
Longevity; IGF-1; Canine; Aging; Insulin signaling
23.  Age relationships of postmortem observations in Portuguese Water Dogs 
Age  2010;33(3):461-473.
A dog model has been used to evaluate histological changes arising from senescence. Autopsies of 145 Portuguese Water Dogs have been used to evaluate the individual and group “state of health” at time of death. For each dog, weights or dimensions of organs or tissues were obtained, together with histological evaluation of tissues. Twenty-three morphological metrics correlated significantly to age at death. Many of these involved muscles; others were associated with derivatives of embryonic foregut. The latter included lengths of the small intestine and trachea as well as weights of the stomach and some lung lobes. Nearly all of the dogs examined had histological changes in multiple tissues, ranging from two to 12 per dog. Associations among pathologies included inflammatory bowel disease with osteoporosis and dental calculus/periodontitis with atherosclerosis and amyloidosis. In addition, two clusters of histological changes were correlated to aging: hyperplasia, frequency of adenomas, and hemosiderosis constituted one group; inflammation, plasmacytic and lymphocytic infiltration, fibrosis, and atrophy, another. Heritability analysis indicated that many of the changes in tissue/organ morphology or histology could be heritable and possibly associated with IGF1, but more autopsies will be required to substantiate these genetic relationships.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9181-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9181-5
PMCID: PMC3168605  PMID: 20845083
Age of death; Autopsy; Dog; Pathology; Histology
24.  Chronic resveratrol intake reverses pro-inflammatory cytokine profile and oxidative DNA damage in ageing hybrid mice 
Age  2010;33(3):229-246.
Thymic involution and shrinkage of secondary lymphoid organs are leading causes of the deterioration of the T-cell compartment with age. Inflamm-aging, a sustained inflammatory status has been associated with chronic diseases and shortened longevity. This is the first study to investigate the effect of treating aging hybrid mice with long-term, low-dose resveratrol (RSV) in drinking water by assessing multiple immunological markers and profiles in the immune system. We found that hybrid mice exhibited marked age-related changes in the CD3+CD4+, C3+CD8+, CD4+CD25+, CD4M and CD8M surface markers. RSV reversed surface phenotypes of old mice to that of young mice by maintaining the CD4+ and CD8+ population in splenocytes as well as reducing CD8+CD44+ (CD8M) cells in the aged. RSV also enhanced the CD4+CD25+ population in old mice. Interestingly, pro-inflammatory status in young mice was transiently elevated by RSV but it consequently mitigated the age-dependent increased pro-inflammatory cytokine profile while preserving the anti-inflammatory cytokine condition in the old mice. Age-dependent increase in 8OHdG, an oxidative DNA damage marker was ameliorated by RSV. Immunological-focused microarray gene expression analysis showed that only the CD72 gene was significantly downregulated in the 12-month RSV-treated mice compared to age-matched controls. Our study indicates that RSV even at low physiological relevant levels is able to affect the immune system without causing marked gene expression changes.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9174-4
PMCID: PMC3168607  PMID: 20730501
Resveratrol; Aging; Cytokines; Inflammation; Oxidative DNA damage; T lymphocytes; Surface markers
25.  Plasma biomarkers of mouse aging 
Age  2010;33(3):291-307.
Normal aging is accompanied by a series of physiological changes such as gray hair, cataracts, reduced immunity, and increased susceptibility to disease. To identify novel biomarkers of normal aging, we analyzed plasma proteins of male mice longitudinally from 2 to 19 months of age. Plasma proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified using mass spectrometry (MS), MS/MS and liquid chromatography MS/MS. We found that many plasma proteins exist as multiple isoforms with different masses and/or charges. Thirty-nine protein spots (corresponding to six distinct proteins) have been identified, 13 of which exhibited significant changes with age. For example, several proteins increased significantly during aging including one isoform of transthyretin, two isoforms of haptoglobin, and three isoforms of immunoglobulin kappa chain. Conversely, several proteins decreased significantly during aging including peroxiredoxin-2, serum amyloid protein A-1, and five isoforms of albumin. Identification of these proteins provides new biomarkers of normal aging in mice. If validated in humans, these biomarkers may facilitate therapeutic interventions to identify premature aging, delay aging, and/or improve healthspan of the elderly.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9179-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9179-z
PMCID: PMC3168609  PMID: 20842533
Mouse aging; Biomarkers; Proteomics; Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; Plasma

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