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1.  Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incident frailty: The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing 
Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands)  2014;36(4):9692.
Cross-sectional studies show that frailty is common in older people with cardiovascular disease. Whether older people at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease are more likely to become frail is unclear. We used multinomial logistic regression to examine the prospective relation between Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incidence of physical frailty or pre-frailty, defined according to the Fried criteria, in 1726 men and women aged 60 to over 90 years from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing who had no history of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Men and women with higher Framingham cardiovascular risk scores were more likely to become frail over the 4-year follow-up period. For a standard deviation higher score at baseline, the relative risk ratio (95% confidence interval) for incident frailty, adjusted for sex and baseline frailty status, was 2.76 (2.18, 3.49). There was a significant association between Framingham cardiovascular risk score and risk of pre-frailty: 1.69 (1.46, 1.95). After further adjustment for other potential confounding factors the relative risk ratios for frailty and pre-frailty were 2.15 (1.68, 2.75) and 1.50 (1.29, 1.74) respectively. The associations were unchanged after excluding incident cases of cardiovascular disease. Separate adjustment for each component of the risk score suggested that no single component was driving the associations between cardiovascular risk score and incident pre-frailty or frailty. Framingham cardiovascular risk scores may be useful for predicting the development of physical frailty in older people. We now need to understand the biological mechanisms whereby cardiovascular risk increases the risk of frailty.
doi:10.1007/s11357-014-9692-6
PMCID: PMC4129936  PMID: 25085033
frailty; cardiovascular risk; cohort; longitudinal study
2.  Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incident frailty: the English longitudinal study of ageing 
Age  2014;36(4):9692.
Cross-sectional studies show that frailty is common in older people with cardiovascular disease. Whether older people at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease are more likely to become frail is unclear. We used multinomial logistic regression to examine the prospective relation between Framingham cardiovascular disease risk scores and incidence of physical frailty or pre-frailty, defined according to the Fried criteria, in 1,726 men and women aged 60 to over 90 years from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing who had no history of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Men and women with higher Framingham cardiovascular risk scores were more likely to become frail over the 4-year follow-up period. For a standard deviation higher score at baseline, the relative risk ratio (95 % confidence interval) for incident frailty, adjusted for sex and baseline frailty status, was 2.76 (2.18, 3.49). There was a significant association between Framingham cardiovascular risk score and risk of pre-frailty: 1.69 (1.46, 1.95). After further adjustment for other potential confounding factors, the relative risk ratios for frailty and pre-frailty were 2.15 (1.68, 2.75) and 1.50 (1.29, 1.74), respectively. The associations were unchanged after excluding incident cases of cardiovascular disease. Separate adjustment for each component of the risk score suggested that no single component was driving the associations between cardiovascular risk score and incident pre-frailty or frailty. Framingham cardiovascular risk scores may be useful for predicting the development of physical frailty in older people. We now need to understand the biological mechanisms whereby cardiovascular risk increases the risk of frailty.
doi:10.1007/s11357-014-9692-6
PMCID: PMC4129936  PMID: 25085033
Frailty; Cardiovascular risk; Cohort; Longitudinal study
3.  Physical capability and subsequent positive mental wellbeing in older people: findings from five HALCyon cohorts 
Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands)  2013;36(1):10.1007/s11357-013-9553-8.
Objective measures of physical capability are being used in a growing number of studies as biomarkers of healthy ageing. However, very little research has been done to assess the impact of physical capability on subsequent positive mental wellbeing, the maintenance of which is widely considered to be an essential component of healthy ageing. We aimed to test the associations of grip strength and walking, timed get up and go and chair rise speeds (assessed at ages 53 to 82 years) with positive mental wellbeing assessed using the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) five to ten years later. Data were drawn from five British cohorts participating in the HALCyon research collaboration. Data from each study were analysed separately and then combined using random-effects meta-analyses. Higher levels of physical capability were consistently associated with higher subsequent levels of wellbeing; for example, a 1SD increase in grip strength was associated with an age and sex-adjusted mean difference in WEMWBS score of 0.81 (0.25, 1.37), equivalent to 10% of a standard deviation (3 studies, N=3,096). When adjusted for body size, health status, living alone, socioeconomic position and neuroticism the associations remained albeit attenuated. The finding of these consistent modest associations across five studies, spanning early and later old age, highlights the importance of maintaining physical capability in later life and provides additional justification for using objective measures of physical capability as markers of healthy ageing.
doi:10.1007/s11357-013-9553-8
PMCID: PMC3818137  PMID: 23818103
physical capability; positive mental wellbeing; grip strength; walking speed; chair rise time
4.  Physical capability and subsequent positive mental wellbeing in older people: findings from five HALCyon cohorts 
Age  2013;36(1):445-456.
Objective measures of physical capability are being used in a growing number of studies as biomarkers of healthy ageing. However, very little research has been done to assess the impact of physical capability on subsequent positive mental wellbeing, the maintenance of which is widely considered to be an essential component of healthy ageing. We aimed to test the associations of grip strength and walking, timed get up and go and chair rise speeds (assessed at ages 53 to 82 years) with positive mental wellbeing assessed using the Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) 5 to 10 years later. Data were drawn from five British cohorts participating in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course research collaboration. Data from each study were analysed separately and then combined using random-effects meta-analyses. Higher levels of physical capability were consistently associated with higher subsequent levels of wellbeing; for example, a 1SD increase in grip strength was associated with an age and sex-adjusted mean difference in WEMWBS score of 0.81 (0.25, 1.37), equivalent to 10 % of a standard deviation (three studies, N = 3,096). When adjusted for body size, health status, living alone, socioeconomic position and neuroticism the associations remained albeit attenuated. The finding of these consistent modest associations across five studies, spanning early and later old age, highlights the importance of maintaining physical capability in later life and provides additional justification for using objective measures of physical capability as markers of healthy ageing.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11357-013-9553-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11357-013-9553-8
PMCID: PMC3818137  PMID: 23818103
Physical capability; Positive mental wellbeing; Grip strength; Walking speed; Chair rise time
5.  Association of lung function with physical, mental and cognitive function in early old age 
Age  2010;33(3):385-392.
Lung function predicts mortality; whether it is associated with functional status in the general population remains unclear. This study examined the association of lung function with multiple measures of functioning in early old age. Data are drawn from the Whitehall II study; data on lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, height FEV1), walking speed (2.44 m), cognitive function (memory and reasoning) and self-reported physical and mental functioning (SF-36) were available on 4,443 individuals, aged 50–74 years. In models adjusted for age, 1 standard deviation (SD) higher height-adjusted FEV1 was associated with greater walking speed (beta = 0.16, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.19), memory (beta = 0.09, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.12), reasoning (beta = 0.16, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.19) and self-reported physical functioning (beta = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.16). Socio-demographic measures, health behaviours (smoking, alcohol, physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption), body mass index (BMI) and chronic conditions explained two-thirds of the association with walking speed and self-assessed physical functioning and over 80% of the association with cognitive function. Our results suggest that lung function is a good ‘summary’ measure of overall functioning in early old age.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9189-x
PMCID: PMC3168608  PMID: 20878489
Ageing; Lung function; Cognitive function; Physical function
6.  Association of lung function with physical, mental and cognitive function in early old age 
Age  2010;33(3):385-392.
Lung function predicts mortality, whether it is associated with functional status in the general population remains unclear. This study examined the association of lung function with multiple measures of functioning in early old age. Data are drawn from the Whitehall II study; data on lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second, height FEV1), walking speed (over 2.44 m), cognitive function (memory and reasoning), and self-reported physical and mental functioning (SF-36) were available on 4443 individuals, aged 50–74 years. In models adjusted for age, one standard deviation (SD) higher height-adjusted FEV1 was associated with greater walking speed (beta=0.16, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.19), memory (beta=0.09, 95% CI: 0.06, 0.12), reasoning (beta=0.16, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.19), and self-reported physical functioning (beta=0.13, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.16). Socio-demographic measures, health behaviours (smoking, alcohol, physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption), BMI and chronic conditions explained two-thirds of the association with walking speed and self-assessed physical functioning and over 80% of the association with cognitive function. Our results suggest that lung function is a good “summary” measure of overall functioning in early old age.
doi:10.1007/s11357-010-9189-x
PMCID: PMC3168608  PMID: 20878489
Aged; Aging; physiology; psychology; Cognition; physiology; Female; Health Status; Humans; Lung; physiology; Male; Middle Aged; Spirometry; Walking; physiology; ageing; lung function; cognitive function; physical function
7.  Dehydroepiandrosterone and age-related cognitive decline 
Age  2009;32(1):61-67.
In humans the circulating concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) decrease markedly during aging, and have been implicated in age-associated cognitive decline. This has led to the hypothesis that DHEA supplementation during aging may improve memory. In rodents, a cognitive anti-aging effect of DHEA and DHEAS has been observed but it is unclear whether this effect is mediated indirectly through conversion of these steroids to estradiol. Moreover, despite the demonstration of correlations between endogenous DHEA concentrations and cognitive ability in certain human patient populations, such correlations have yet to be convincingly demonstrated during normal human aging. This review highlights important differences between rodents and primates in terms of their circulating DHEA and DHEAS concentrations, and suggests that age-related changes within the human DHEA metabolic pathway may contribute to the relative inefficacy of DHEA replacement therapies in humans. The review also highlights the value of using nonhuman primates as a pragmatic animal model for testing the therapeutic potential of DHEA for age-associate cognitive decline in humans.
doi:10.1007/s11357-009-9113-4
PMCID: PMC2829637  PMID: 19711196
Dehydroepiandrosterone; Cognitive decline; Intracrinology; Neurosteroidogenesis
8.  Dehydroepiandrosterone and age-related cognitive decline 
Age (Dordrecht, Netherlands)  2009;32(1):61-67.
In humans the circulating concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) decrease markedly during aging, and have been implicated in age-associated cognitive decline. This has led to the hypothesis that DHEA supplementation during aging may improve memory. In rodents, a cognitive anti-aging effect of DHEA and DHEAS has been observed but it is unclear whether this effect is mediated indirectly through conversion of these steroids to estradiol. Moreover, despite the demonstration of correlations between endogenous DHEA concentrations and cognitive ability in certain human patient populations, such correlations have yet to be convincingly demonstrated during normal human aging. This review highlights important differences between rodents and primates in terms of their circulating DHEA and DHEAS concentrations, and suggests that age-related changes within the human DHEA metabolic pathway may contribute to the relative inefficacy of DHEA replacement therapies in humans. The review also highlights the value of using nonhuman primates as a pragmatic animal model for testing the therapeutic potential of DHEA for age-associate cognitive decline in humans.
doi:10.1007/s11357-009-9113-4
PMCID: PMC2829637  PMID: 19711196
Dehydroepiandrosterone; Cognitive decline; Intracrinology; Neurosteroidogenesis
9.  NK cell immunesenescence is increased by psychological but not physical stress in older adults associated with raised cortisol and reduced perforin expression 
Age  2015;37(1):11.
NK cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) reduces with age and this has been associated previously with increased mortality. The immune response is also modulated by stress, and here, we assessed the effect of the physical stress of hip fracture and the psychological stress of depression on NKCC in an aged immune system. NKCC was assessed in 101 hip fracture patients (81 female) 6 weeks and 6 months after injury and in 50 healthy age-matched controls (28 female). Thirty-eight patients were depressed at 6 weeks post-injury, and NKCC was reduced in patients who developed depression compared with non-depressed hip fracture patients (p = 0.004) or controls (p < 0.02). NKCC remained lower in the depressed patients compared to those without depression 6 months post-fracture (p = 0.017). We found reduced expression of perforin in NK cells of depressed hip fracture patients compared with controls at 6 weeks (p = 0.001) post-fracture. Serum cortisol levels were also elevated in patients with depression compared to non-depressed patients at 6 weeks (p = 0.01) and 6 months (p = 0.05). NK cells treated with dexamethasone showed a concentration-dependent reduction in NKCC and perforin expression. We propose that depression is the major factor affecting NK cell immunity after hip fracture.
doi:10.1007/s11357-015-9748-2
PMCID: PMC4320126  PMID: 25663421
NK cell; Stress; Immunesenescence; Cortisol
10.  Curcumin induces senescence of primary human cells building the vasculature in a DNA damage and ATM-independent manner 
Age  2015;37(1):7.
Curcumin is considered not only as a supplement of the diet but also as a drug in many types of diseases and even as a potential anti-aging compound. It can reduce inflammation that increases with age and accompanies almost all age-related diseases. It has been suggested that curcumin can play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system. However, there are also data showing that curcumin can induce senescence in cancer cells, which is a beneficial effect in cancer therapy but an undesirable one in the case of normal cells. It is believed that cellular senescence accompanies age-related changes in the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to check if curcumin, in a certain range of concentrations, can induce senescence in cells building the vasculature. We have found that human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells derived from aorta are very sensitive to curcumin treatment and can senesce upon treatment with cytostatic doses. We observed characteristic senescence markers but the number of DNA damage foci decreased. Surprisingly, in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) activation of DNA damage response pathway downstream of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) was observed. ATM silencing and the supplementation of antioxidants, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or trolox, did not reduce the number of senescent cells. Thus, we have shown that curcumin can induce senescence of cells building the vasculature, which is DNA damage and ATM independent and is not induced by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. We postulate that an increase in the bioavailability of curcumin should be introduced very carefully considering senescence induction as a side effect.
Electronic supplementary material
The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11357-014-9744-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
doi:10.1007/s11357-014-9744-y
PMCID: PMC4315775  PMID: 25649709
Curcumin; Sirtuins; VSMCs; ECs; Aging; Atherosclerosis
11.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889875  PMID: 23625154
12.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889876  PMID: 23943111
13.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889877  PMID: 23949159
14.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889878  PMID: 23649646
15.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889879  PMID: 23846127
16.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889880  PMID: 23818104
17.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889881  PMID: 23690132
18.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889882  PMID: 23765046
19.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889883  PMID: 23913251
20.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889884  PMID: 23709317
21.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889915  PMID: 23881607
22.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889886  PMID: 23881606
23.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889887  PMID: 23695949
24.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889889  PMID: 23821322
25.  [No title available] 
PMCID: PMC3889890  PMID: 23695950

Results 1-25 (598)