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1.  Three-dimensional mechanical evaluation of joint contact pressure in 12 periacetabular osteotomy patients with 10-year follow-up 
Acta orthopaedica  2009;80(2):155-161.
Background and purpose
Because of the varying structure of dysplastic hips, the optimal realignment of the joint during periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) may differ between patients. Three-dimensional (3D) mechanical and radiological analysis possibly accounts better for patient-specific morphology, and may improve and automate optimal joint realignment.
Patients and methods
We evaluated the 10-year outcomes of 12 patients following PAO. We compared 3D mechanical analysis results to both radiological and clinical measurements. A 3D discrete-element analysis algorithm was used to calculate the pre- and postoperative contact pressure profile within the hip. Radiological angles describing the coverage of the joint were measured using a computerized approach at actual and theoretical orientations of the acetabular cup. Quantitative results were compared using postoperative clinical evaluation scores (Harris score), and patient-completed outcome surveys (q-score) done at 2 and 10 years.
Results
The 3D mechanical analysis indicated that peak joint contact pressure was reduced by an average factor of 1.7 subsequent to PAO. Lateral coverage of the femoral head increased in all patients; however, it did not proportionally reduce the maximum contact pressure and, in 1 case, the pressure increased. This patient had the lowest 10-year q-score (70 out of 100) of the cohort. Another hip was converted to hip arthroplasty after 3 years because of increasing osteoarthritis.
Interpretation
The 3D analysis showed that a reduction in contact pressure was theoretically possible for all patients in this cohort, but this could not be achieved in every case during surgery. While intraoperative factors may affect the actual surgical outcome, the results show that 3D contact pressure analysis is consistent with traditional PAO planning techniques (more so than 2D analysis) and may be a valuable addition to preoperative planning and intraoperative assessment of joint realignment.
doi:10.3109/17453670902947390
PMCID: PMC2689368  PMID: 19404795
2.  Three-dimensional mechanical evaluation of joint contact pressure in 12 periacetabular osteotomy patients with 10-year follow-up 
Acta Orthopaedica  2009;80(2):155-161.
Background and purpose Because of the varying structure of dysplastic hips, the optimal realignment of the joint during periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) may differ between patients. Three-dimensional (3D) mechanical and radiological analysis possibly accounts better for patient-specific morphology, and may improve and automate optimal joint realignment.
Patients and methods We evaluated the 10-year outcomes of 12 patients following PAO. We compared 3D mechanical analysis results to both radiological and clinical measurements. A 3D discrete-element analysis algorithm was used to calculate the pre- and postoperative contact pressure profile within the hip. Radiological angles describing the coverage of the joint were measured using a computerized approach at actual and theoretical orientations of the acetabular cup. Quantitative results were compared using postoperative clinical evaluation scores (Harris score), and patient-completed outcome surveys (q-score) done at 2 and 10 years.
Results The 3D mechanical analysis indicated that peak joint contact pressure was reduced by an average factor of 1.7 subsequent to PAO. Lateral coverage of the femoral head increased in all patients; however, it did not proportionally reduce the maximum contact pressure and, in 1 case, the pressure increased. This patient had the lowest 10-year q-score (70 out of 100) of the cohort. Another hip was converted to hip arthroplasty after 3 years because of increasing osteoarthritis.
Interpretation The 3D analysis showed that a reduction in contact pressure was theoretically possible for all patients in this cohort, but this could not be achieved in every case during surgery. While intraoperative factors may affect the actual surgical outcome, the results show that 3D contact pressure analysis is consistent with traditional PAO planning techniques (more so than 2D analysis) and may be a valuable addition to preoperative planning and intraoperative assessment of joint realignment.
doi:10.3109/17453670902947390
PMCID: PMC2689368  PMID: 19404795
3.  Changing from analog to digital images: Does it affect the accuracy of alignment measurements of the lower extremity? 
Acta Orthopaedica  2011;82(3):351-355.
Background and purpose
Medical imaging has changed from analog films to digital media. We examined and compared the accuracy of orthopedic measurements using different media.
Methods
Before knee arthroplasty, full-length standing radiographs of 52 legs were obtained. The mechanical axis (MA), tibio-femoral angle (TFA), and femur angle (FA) were measured and analyzed twice, by 2 radiologists, using (1) true-size films, (2) short films, (3) a digital high-resolution workstation, and (4) a web-based personal computer. The agreement between the 4 media was evaluated using the Bland-Altman method (limits of agreement) using the true-size films as a reference standard.
Results
The mean differences in measurements between the traditional true-size films and the 3 other methods were small: for MA –0.20 to 0.07 degrees, and for TFA –0.02 to 0.18 degrees. Also, the limits of agreement between the traditional true-size films and the three other methods were small.
Interpretation
The agreement of the alignment measurements across the 4 different media was good. Orthopedic angles can be measured as accurately from analog films as from digital screens, regardless of film or monitor size.
doi:10.3109/17453674.2011.570670
PMCID: PMC3235315  PMID: 21619504
4.  Outcome of periacetabular osteotomy 
Acta orthopaedica  2005;76(3):303-313.
Background
Due to wide variations in acetabular structure of individuals with hip dysplasia, the measurement of the acetabular orientation may not be sufficient to predict the joint loading and pressure distribution across the joint. Addition of mechanical analysis to preoperative planning, therefore, has the potential to improve the clinical outcome.
We analyzed the effect of periacetabular osteotomy on hip dysplasia using computer-aided simulation of joint contact pressure on regular AP radiographs. The results were compared with the results of surgery based on realignment of acetabular angles to the normal hip.
Patients and methods
We studied 12 consecutive periacetabular osteotomies with no femoral head deformity. The median age of patients, all females, was 35 (20−50) years. The median follow-up was 2 years (1.3−2.2). Patient outcome was measured with the total score of a self-administered questionnaire (q-score) and with the Harris hip score. The pre- and postoperative orientation of the acetabulum was defined using reconstructed 3D CT-slices to measure angles in the three anatomical planes. Peak contact pressure, weight-bearing area, and the centroid of the contact pressure distribution (CP-ratio) were calculated.
Results
While 9 of 12 cases showed decreased peak pressure after surgery, the mean changes in weight-bearing area and peak contact pressure were not statistically significant. However, CP-ratio changed (p < 0.001, paired t-test) with surgery. For the optimal range of CP-ratio (within its mid-range 40−60%), the mechanical outcome improved significantly.
Interpretation
Verifying the correlation between the optimal CP-ratio and the outcome of the surgery requires additional studies on more patients. Moreover, the anatomically measured angles were not correlated with the ranges of CP-ratio, suggesting that they do not always associate with objective mechanical goals of realignment osteotomy. Mechanical analysis, therefore, can be a valuable tool in assessing two-dimensional radiographs in hip dysplasia.
PMCID: PMC2745131  PMID: 16156455
5.  Cementless total hip arthroplasty in patients with severely dysplastic hips and a previous Schanz osteotomy of the femur 
Acta Orthopaedica  2009;80(3):263-269.
Background and purpose Historically, a Schanz osteotomy of the femur has been used to reduce limp in patients with severely dysplastic hips. In such hips, total hip arthroplasty is a technically demanding operation. We report the long-term results of cementless total hip arthroplasty in a group of patients who had all undergone a Schanz osteotomy earlier.
Patients and methods From 1988 through 1995, 68 total hip replacements were performed in 59 consecutive patients previously treated with a Schanz osteotomy. With the cup placed at the level of the true acetabulum, a shortening osteotomy of the proximal part of the femur and distal advancement of the greater trochanter were performed in 56 hips. At a mean of 13 (9–18) years postoperatively, we evaluated these patients clinically and radiographically.
Results The mean Harris hip score had increased from 51 points preoperatively to 93 points. Trendelenburg sign was negative and there was good or slightly reduced abduction strength in 23 of 25 hips that had not been revised. There were 12 perioperative complications. Only 1 cementless press-fit porous-coated cup was revised for aseptic loosening. However, the 12-year survival rate of these cups was only 64%, as 18 cups underwent revision for excessive wear of the polyethylene liner and/or osteolysis. 6 CDH femoral components had to be revised due to technical errors.
Interpretation Our results suggest that cementless total hip arthroplasty combined with a shortening osteotomy of the femur and distal advancement of the greater trochanter can be recommended for most patients with a previous Schanz osteotomy of the femur. Because of the high incidence of liner wear and osteolysÍs of modular cementless cups in this series, nowadays we use hard-on-hard articulations in these patients.
doi:10.3109/17453670902967273
PMCID: PMC2823216  PMID: 19421907

Results 1-5 (5)