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1.  Low revision rate after total hip arthroplasty in patients with pediatric hip diseases 
Acta Orthopaedica  2012;83(5):436-441.
Background
The results of primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) after pediatric hip diseases such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), or Perthes’ disease have been reported to be inferior to the results after primary osteoarthritis of the hip (OA).
Materials and methods
We compared the survival of primary THAs performed during the period 1995–2009 due to previous DDH, SCFE, Perthes’ disease, or primary OA, using merged individual-based data from the Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish arthroplasty registers, called the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA). Cox multiple regression, with adjustment for age, sex, and type of fixation of the prosthesis was used to calculate the survival of the prostheses and the relative revision risks.
Results
370,630 primary THAs were reported to these national registers for 1995–2009. Of these, 14,403 THAs (3.9%) were operated due to pediatric hip diseases (3.1% for Denmark, 8.8% for Norway, and 1.9% for Sweden) and 288,435 THAs (77.8%) were operated due to OA. Unadjusted 10-year Kaplan-Meier survival of THAs after pediatric hip diseases (94.7% survival) was inferior to that after OA (96.6% survival). Consequently, an increased risk of revision for hips with a previous pediatric hip disease was seen (risk ratio (RR) 1.4, 95% CI: 1.3–1.5). However, after adjustment for differences in sex and age of the patients, and in fixation of the prostheses, no difference in survival was found (93.6% after pediatric hip diseases and 93.8% after OA) (RR 1.0, CI: 1.0–1.1). Nevertheless, during the first 6 postoperative months more revisions were reported for THAs secondary to pediatric hip diseases (RR 1.2, CI: 1.0–1.5), mainly due to there being more revisions for dislocations (RR 1.8, CI: 1.4–2.3). Comparison between the different diagnosis groups showed that the overall risk of revision after DDH was higher than after OA (RR 1.1, CI: 1.0–1.2), whereas the combined group Perthes’ disease/SCFE did not have a significantly different risk of revision to that of OA (RR 0.9, CI: 0.7–1.0), but had a lower risk than after DDH (RR 0.8, CI: 0.7–1.0).
Interpretation
After adjustment for differences in age, sex, and type of fixation of the prosthesis, no difference in risk of revision was found for primary THAs performed due to pediatric hip diseases and those performed due to primary OA.
doi:10.3109/17453674.2012.736171
PMCID: PMC3488168  PMID: 23043269
2.  Total hip arthroplasty in young adults, with focus on Perthes' disease and slipped capital femoral epiphysis 
Acta Orthopaedica  2012;83(2):159-164.
Background and purpose
Pediatric hip diseases account for 9% of all primary hip arthroplasties in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We wanted to validate the diagnosis as reported to the register and to assess the quality of life of these patients after hip replacement.
Patients and methods
540 patients accepted to participate in this follow-up study (634 hips). All were less than 40 years of age and had been reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register as having undergone a primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) between 1987 and 2007. The underlying diagnosis, age at diagnosis, and type of treatment given prior to the hip replacement were recorded from the original hospital notes.
Results
The diagnoses reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register were confirmed to be correct in 91% of all cases (538/592). For the 94 hips that had been treated due to Perthes' disease or slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), the diagnosis was verified in 95% of cases (89/94). The corresponding proportion for inflammatory hip disease was 98% (137/140) and it was only 61% for primary osteoarthritis (19/31). The self reported quality of life (EQ-5D) was poorer for these young patients with THA than for persons in age-matched cohorts from Great Britain and Sweden, except for those with an underlying SCFE.
Interpretation
The diagnoses reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register as the underlying cause of THA were correct in 91% of cases. Individuals who undergo THA before the age of 40 have a reduced quality of life, except for those requiring a hip replacement because of SCFE.
doi:10.3109/17453674.2011.641105
PMCID: PMC3339530  PMID: 22112152
3.  In situ fixation of slipped capital femoral epiphysis with Steinmann pins 
Acta Orthopaedica  2011;82(3):333-338.
Background and purpose
Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is often treated by surgical fixation; however, no agreement exists regarding technique. We analyzed the outcome of in situ fixation with Steinmann pins.
Patients and methods
All 67 subjects operated for slipped capital femoral epiphysis at Haukeland University Hospital during the period 1990–2007 were included. All were treated by in situ fixation with 2 or 3 parallel Steinmann pins (8 mm threads at the medial end). The follow-up evaluation consisted of clinical examination and hip radiographs. Radiographic outcome was based on measurements of slip progression, growth of the femoral neck, leg length discrepancy, and signs of avascular necrosis and chondrolysis.
Results
67 subjects (41 males) were operated due to unilateral slips (n = 47) or bilateral slips (n = 20). Mean age at time of diagnosis was 13 (7.2–16) years. Mean age at follow-up was 19 (14–30) years, with a mean postoperative interval of 6.0 (2–16) years. The operated femoral neck was 9% longer at skeletal maturity than at surgery, indicating continued growth of the femoral neck. At skeletal maturity, 12 subjects had radiographic features suggestive of a previous asymptomatic slip of the contralateral hip. The total number of bilateral cases of SCFE was 32, i.e half of the children had bilateral SCFE. 3 subjects required additional surgery and mild avascular necrosis of the femoral head was seen in 1 patient. None had slip progression or chondrolysis.
Interpretation
In situ pinning of SCFE with partly threaded Steinmann pins appears to be a feasible and safe method, with few complications. The technique allows further growth of the femoral neck.
doi:10.3109/17453674.2011.579520
PMCID: PMC3235312  PMID: 21504367
4.  Total hip replacement in young adults with hip dysplasia 
Acta Orthopaedica  2011;82(2):149-154.
Background and purpose
Dysplasia of the hip increases the risk of secondary degenerative change and subsequent total hip replacement. Here we report on age at diagnosis of dysplasia, previous treatment, and quality of life for patients born after 1967 and registered with a total hip replacement due to dysplasia in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. We also used the medical records to validate the diagnosis reported by the orthopedic surgeon to the register.
Methods
Subjects born after January 1, 1967 and registered with a primary total hip replacement in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register during the period 1987–2007 (n = 713) were included in the study. Data on hip symptoms and quality of life (EQ-5D) were collected through questionnaires. Elaborating information was retrieved from the medical records.
Results
540 of 713 patients (76%) (corresponding to 634 hips) returned the questionnaires and consented for additional information to be retrieved from their medical records. Hip dysplasia accounted for 163 of 634 hip replacements (26%), 134 of which were in females (82%). Median age at time of diagnosis was 7.8 (0–39) years: 4.4 years for females and 22 years for males. After reviewing accessible medical records, the diagnosis of hip dysplasia was confirmed in 132 of 150 hips (88%).
Interpretation
One quarter of hip replacements performed in patients aged 40 or younger were due to an underlying hip dysplasia, which, in most cases, was diagnosed during late childhood. The dysplasia diagnosis reported to the register was correct for 88% of the hips.
doi:10.3109/17453674.2011.566146
PMCID: PMC3235283  PMID: 21434808

Results 1-4 (4)