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1.  Diffuse scattering study of aspirin forms (I) and (II) 
Full three-dimensional diffuse scattering data have been recorded for both polymorphic forms [(I) and (II)] of aspirin and these data have been analysed using Monte Carlo computer modelling. The observed scattering in form (I) is well reproduced by a simple harmonic model of thermally induced displacements. The data for form (II) show, in addition to thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) similar to that in form (I), diffuse streaks originating from stacking fault-like defects as well as other effects that can be attributed to strain induced by these defects.
Full three-dimensional diffuse scattering data have been recorded for both polymorphic forms [(I) and (II)] of aspirin and these data have been analysed using Monte Carlo computer modelling. The observed scattering in form (I) is well reproduced by a simple harmonic model of thermally induced displacements. The data for form (II) show, in addition to thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) similar to that in form (I), diffuse streaks originating from stacking fault-like defects as well as other effects that can be attributed to strain induced by these defects. The present study has provided strong evidence that the aspirin form (II) structure is a true polymorph with a structure quite distinct from that of form (I). The diffuse scattering evidence presented shows that crystals of form (II) are essentially composed of large single domains of the form (II) lattice with a relatively small volume fraction of intrinsic planar defects or faults comprising misoriented bilayers of molecular dimers. There is evidence of some local aggregation of these defect bilayers to form small included regions of the form (I) structure. Evidence is also presented that shows that the strain effects arise from the mismatch of molecular packing between the defect region and the surrounding form (II) lattice. This occurs at the edges of the planar defects in the direction only.
doi:10.1107/S0108768110037055
PMCID: PMC2992034  PMID: 21099031
diffuse scattering; polymorphism; aspirin; harmonic model
2.  Validation of experimental molecular crystal structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations 
The accuracy of a dispersion-corrected density functional theory method is validated against 241 experimental organic crystal structures from Acta Cryst. Section E.
This paper describes the validation of a dispersion-corrected density functional theory (d-DFT) method for the purpose of assessing the correctness of experimental organic crystal structures and enhancing the information content of purely experimental data. 241 experimental organic crystal structures from the August 2008 issue of Acta Cryst. Section E were energy-minimized in full, including unit-cell parameters. The differences between the experimental and the minimized crystal structures were subjected to statistical analysis. The r.m.s. Cartesian displacement excluding H atoms upon energy minimization with flexible unit-cell parameters is selected as a pertinent indicator of the correctness of a crystal structure. All 241 experimental crystal structures are reproduced very well: the average r.m.s. Cartesian displacement for the 241 crystal structures, including 16 disordered structures, is only 0.095 Å (0.084 Å for the 225 ordered structures). R.m.s. Cartesian displacements above 0.25 Å either indicate incorrect experimental crystal structures or reveal interesting structural features such as exceptionally large temperature effects, incorrectly modelled disorder or symmetry breaking H atoms. After validation, the method is applied to nine examples that are known to be ambiguous or subtly incorrect.
doi:10.1107/S0108768110031873
PMCID: PMC2940256  PMID: 20841921
dispersion-corrected density functional theory; organic structures
3.  Towards a generalized vision of oxides: disclosing the role of cations and anions in determining unit-cell dimensions 
Theoretical calculations of the electron-localization function show that, at the volumes of the two CaO phases (rocksalt and CsCl type), the parent Ca structures (fcc: face-centred cubic; sc: simple cubic) exhibit charge-concentration zones which coincide with the positions occupied by the O atoms in their oxides. For the first time, the structure type, dimension and topology of CaO and BaSnO3 are explained in univocal physical terms.
Theoretical calculations of the electron-localization function show that, at the volumes of the two CaO phases (rocksalt and CsCl type), the parent Ca structures (fcc: face-centred cubic and sc: simple cubic, respectively) exhibit charge concentration zones which coincide with the positions occupied by the O atoms in their oxides. Similar features, also observed for the pairs Ca/CaF2 and BaSn/BaSnO3, are supported by recent high-pressure experiments as well as electron-localization function (ELF) calculations, carried out on elemental K. At very high pressures, the elemental K adopts the hP4 structure, topologically identical to that of the K atoms in high-pressure K2S and high-temperature α-K2SO4. Moreover, the ELF for the hP4 structure shows charge concentration (∼ 2 electrons) at the sites occupied by the S atoms in the high-pressure K2S phase. All these features confirm the oxidation/high-pressure equivalence as well as the prediction of how cation arrays should be metastable phases of the parent metals. For the first time to our knowledge, the structure type, dimension and topology of several oxides and fluorides (CaO, CaF2 and BaSnO3) are explained in univocal physical terms.
doi:10.1107/S0108768110013200
PMCID: PMC2873863  PMID: 20484804
electron localization; high-pressure experiments
4.  A complicated quasicrystal approximant ∊16 predicted by the strong-reflections approach 
The structure of the quasicrystal approximant ∊16 was predicted by the strong-reflections approach based on the known approximant ∊6.
The structure of a complicated quasicrystal approximant ∊16 was predicted from a known and related quasicrystal approximant ∊6 by the strong-reflections approach. Electron-diffraction studies show that in reciprocal space, the positions of the strongest reflections and their intensity distributions are similar for both approximants. By applying the strong-reflections approach, the structure factors of ∊16 were deduced from those of the known ∊6 structure. Owing to the different space groups of the two structures, a shift of the phase origin had to be applied in order to obtain the phases of ∊16. An electron-density map of ∊16 was calculated by inverse Fourier transformation of the structure factors of the 256 strongest reflections. Similar to that of ∊6, the predicted structure of ∊16 contains eight layers in each unit cell, stacked along the b axis. Along the b axis, ∊16 is built by banana-shaped tiles and pentagonal tiles; this structure is confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The simulated precession electron-diffraction (PED) patterns from the structure model are in good agreement with the experimental ones. ∊16 with 153 unique atoms in the unit cell is the most complicated approximant structure ever solved or predicted.
doi:10.1107/S0108768109053804
PMCID: PMC2811402  PMID: 20101079
quasicrystal approximant; strong-reflections approach; electron diffraction; inverse Fourier transformation

Results 1-4 (4)