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1.  Delaying a Treatment Switch in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV Type 1-Infected Patients with Detectable Drug-Resistant Viremia Does Not Have a Profound Effect on Immune Parameters: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5115 
Some patients are unable to achieve and maintain an undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA level with combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) and are therefore maintained on a partially suppressive regimen. To determine the immune consequences of continuing ART despite persistent viremia, we randomized 47 ART-treated individuals with low to moderate plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (200–9999 copies/ml) to either an immediate switch in therapy or a delayed switch (when plasma HIV-1 RNA became ≥10,000 copies/ml). After 48 weeks of follow-up, naive and memory CD4+ T cell percents were comparable in the two groups. The proportion of subjects with a lymphocyte proliferative response to Candida, Mycobacterium avium- intracellulare complex, or HIV-gag was also not significantly different at week 48. Delaying a treatment switch in patients with partial virologic suppression and stable CD4+ T cells does not have profound effects on immune parameters.
doi:10.1089/aid.2008.0200
PMCID: PMC2755543  PMID: 19239354
2.  Delaying a Treatment Switch in Antiretroviral-Treated HIV Type 1-Infected Patients with Detectable Drug-Resistant Viremia Does Not Have a Profound Effect on Immune Parameters: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5115 
Abstract
Some patients are unable to achieve and maintain an undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA level with combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) and are therefore maintained on a partially suppressive regimen. To determine the immune consequences of continuing ART despite persistent viremia, we randomized 47 ART-treated individuals with low to moderate plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (200–9999 copies/ml) to either an immediate switch in therapy or a delayed switch (when plasma HIV-1 RNA became ≥10,000 copies/ml). After 48 weeks of follow-up, naive and memory CD4+ T cell percents were comparable in the two groups. The proportion of subjects with a lymphocyte proliferative response to Candida, Mycobacterium avium- intracellulare complex, or HIV-gag was also not significantly different at week 48. Delaying a treatment switch in patients with partial virologic suppression and stable CD4+ T cells does not have profound effects on immune parameters.
doi:10.1089/aid.2008.0200
PMCID: PMC2755543  PMID: 19239354
3.  Early versus Delayed Fixed Dose Combination Abacavir/Lamivudine/Zidovudine in Patients with HIV and Tuberculosis in Tanzania 
AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses  2009;25(12):1277-1285.
Abstract
Fixed dose combination abacavir/lamivudine/zidovudine (ABC/3TC/ZDV) among HIV-1 and tuberculosis (TB)-coinfected patients was evaluated and outcomes between early vs. delayed initiation were compared. In a randomized, pilot study conducted in the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania, HIV-infected inpatients with smear-positive TB and total lymphocyte count <1200/mm3 were randomized to initiate ABC/3TC/ZDV either 2 (early) or 8 (delayed) weeks after commencing antituberculosis therapy and were followed for 104 weeks. Of 94 patients screened, 70 enrolled (41% female, median CD4 count 103 cells/mm3), and 33 in each group completed 104 weeks. Two deaths and 12 serious adverse events (SAEs) were observed in the early arm vs. one death, one clinical failure, and seven SAEs in the delayed arm (p = 0.6012 for time to first grade 3/4 event, SAE, or death). CD4 cell increases were +331 and +328 cells/mm3, respectively. TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes (TB-IRIS) were not observed in any subject. Using intent-to-treat (ITT), missing = failure analyses, 74% (26/35) vs. 89% (31/35) randomized to early vs. delayed therapy had HIV RNA levels <400 copies/ml at 104 weeks (p = 0.2182) and 66% (23/35) vs. 74% (26/35), respectively, had HIV RNA levels <50 copies/ml (p = 0.6026). In an analysis in which switches from ABC/3TC/ZDV = failure, those receiving early therapy were less likely to be suppressed to <400 copies/ml [60% (21/35) vs. 86% (30/35), p = 0.030]. TB-IRIS was not observed among the 70 coinfected subjects beginning antiretroviral treatment. ABC/3TC/ZDV was well tolerated and resulted in steady immunologic improvement. Rates of virologic suppression were similar between early and delayed treatment strategies with triple nucleoside regimens when substitutions were allowed.
doi:10.1089/aid.2009.0100
PMCID: PMC2858925  PMID: 20001518

Results 1-3 (3)