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issn:2229-340
1.  HEALTH EDUCATION NEEDS FOR PREGNANCY: A STUDY AMONG WOMEN ATTENDING PRIMARY HEALTH CENTERS 
Objective:
To find out the level of health awareness related to pregnancy and the sources of information among parous women visiting the Primary Health Centers in Al- Khobar.
Methods:
This is a cross-sectional study conducted at three Primary Health Centers in Al-Khobar during a two-week period in April 2001. Five hundred and eighty one parous women who were eligible for the study were interviewed with the help of a questionnaire.
Results:
A large proportion of the women were well informed about certain health issues of pregnancy such as dietary intake of essential foods like dairy products (74.7%), Protein-rich foods (71.4%) and fruits (68.2%), the hours of daily rest necessary (81.9%), the need for exercise (83.6%), the importance and timing of antenatal visits, the risk of smoking in pregnancy (99.3%) and proper spacing of babies (97.7%). However, many women had no knowledge of the importance of taking high-fiber foods (55.1%) to avoid constipation, the required dietary changes in early pregnancy to prevent nausea and vomiting, and the ill-effects of maternal smoking on the fetus, Rubella infection and advancing maternal age on the fetus. They were also not aware of the importance of the various antenatal procedures such as blood examination, breast-care during pregnancy and immunizations to prevent Tetanus and Rubella infection. A higher literacy level of the women was significantly correlated with better knowledge on certain health parameters. Physicians and nurses constituted poor sources of health information (35.6%).
Conclusion:
There is a need to restructure the Health Education programmes relating to pregnancy delivered through PHCs and the mass media for better knowledge among women of childbearing age can decrease pregnancy-related problems and improve perinatal outcome.
PMCID: PMC3425755  PMID: 23011978
Health education; Pregnancy; health knowledge
2.  ARE YOUNG ARAB WOMEN EATING A HEALTHY DIET? A QUALITATIVE DIETARY STUDY AMONG COLLEGE HOSTEL STUDENTS 
Background:
Two recent studies conducted on young College Arab Women showed a trend towards over nutrition. It is well known that good eating habits adopted early in life not only improve health and control obesity in the youthful years but also promote healthy eating behaviours in later life.
Objective:
To investigate the dietary habits of young college women and identify specific areas for nutrition education.
Methods:
A self-administered questionnaire containing 20 items related to qualitative dietary history was distributed to all the college (King Faisal University, Dammam) women residing in the hostel during a one-week period in April 1998.
Result:
Out of a total of 56 women, 50.7% frequently missed out on breakfast and lunch. To satisfy their state of hunger, frequent snacking with deserts/carbohydrate-rich food items (21.4%) and consumption of regular cola drinks (32.1%) was common. Fast food rich in fat and calories from restaurants was popular among a majority (98.2%) of the students. On the other hand, there was a deficient intake of protective foods and nutrients for repair, maintenance and growth, such as fruits (73.2%), vegetables (85.6%), milk and milk products (66.1%) and protein-rich foods (82.1%).
Conclusion:
To decrease the risk of malnutrition among young college women, there is a need to target them for nutrition education and adoption of healthy eating practices within the context of a healthy life style.
PMCID: PMC3437099  PMID: 23008599
Dietary habits; College women; Dammam; Saudi Arabia
3.  Perception of Infant Feeding Practices among mothers-to-be:An Urban-based school study 
This study on the perception of infant feeding practices was conducted among unmarried girls from two randomly selected Saudi public schools in Al-Khobar. Though it was encouraging to note that the attitude of the, girls was largely in favour of breast feeding, many deficiencies were identified in their knowledge of infant feeding. 67.1 % students were unaware of the importance of colostrum and 70.5% opted for scheduled feeding over demand feeding. To 40.2% girls an optimum duration of 18-24 months for breast Feeding was not desirable. A large proportion of students lacked knowledge on the methods of promoting lactation such as early suckling (51.4%), frequent suckling (40%) and “rooming-in” (37.9%). Only 28% of the girls knew the correct age of introducing solid food. With the present trend of decline in the duration of breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia, the schools could play an important role in training and motivating future mothers for proper infant feeding practices.
PMCID: PMC3437185  PMID: 23008538
breast-feeding; weaning; school health education

Results 1-3 (3)