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1.  SIDELINE ASSESSMENT AND RETURN‐TO‐PLAY DECISION‐MAKING FOR AN ACUTE ELBOW ULNAR COLLATERAL LIGAMENT SPRAIN 
Throwing athletes are at high risk for elbow injuries. The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the elbow, in particular, must resist large valgus forces during the throwing motion. An acute UCL sprain requires the sports medicine professional on the sidelines to thoroughly assess the injury and reach a return‐to‐play decision in a timely manner. A sports medicine professional who makes an accurate diagnosis, reaches a correct return‐to‐play decision, and initiates early treatment gives the athlete the best chance for a rapid, successful return to their sport.
Level of Evidence:
5
PMCID: PMC3625800  PMID: 23593559
Acute assessment; elbow; return‐to‐play; ulnar collateral ligament sprain
2.  SIDELINE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE DISLOCATION OF THE GLENOHUMERAL JOINT‐ A UNIQUE APPROACH TO ATHLETE SELF‐REDUCTION 
The acute anterior dislocation of the glenohumeral joint (GHJ) poses a challenge to sports medicine providers at all levels and in all settings. This macrotraumatic injury occurs in athletes who participate in a wide variety of sports, most typically as a result of contact or collision mechanisms. Quick and effective relocation of the GHJ is an important skill for on the sideline or on the field management of this type of dislocation when appropriate and allowable by facility protocol. This clinical suggestion describes one possible technique for athlete self‐reduction that may be appropriate in some circumstances. This is in contrast to forcible reduction by the health professional, which is outside of the scope of this clinical commentary.
Level of Evidence:
5
PMCID: PMC3578437  PMID: 23439949
Anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation; self‐reduction technique
3.  RECOGNITION AND MANAGEMENT OF ABDOMINAL INJURIES AT ATHLETIC EVENTS 
Most athletic events present potential for abdominal trauma for their participants. The responsibility of the “most medical” professional at the event is to have the knowledge to recognize, treat, and properly manage these injuries. As these injuries are very different in nature from orthopedic injuries, the dangers presented are also very different, and can include outcomes as serious as organ failure and death. Because of these differing risks, many professionals are uneasy about proper treatment, especially on the sidelines. However, with a few key points about mechanism of injury, monitoring changes in vital signs, and careful assessment of presenting symptoms, most abdominal injuries can be properly managed on the sidelines.
Level of Evidence:
5
PMCID: PMC3414076  PMID: 22893864
abdominal trauma; emergency response; herniation; organ damage; rupture
4.  MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDING AND OPEN WOUNDS IN ATHLETES 
Bleeding or open wounds of the integumentary system occur frequently in athletics. Integumentary wounds vary from minor scrapes, blisters, and small punctures to more serious lacerations and arterial wounds that could threaten the life of the athlete. The Sports physical therapist (PT) must realize that integumentary wounds and subsequent bleeding can occur in many sports, and assessment and care of such trauma is an essential skill. The purpose of this “On the Sidelines” clinical commentary is to review types of integumentary wounds that may occur in sport and their acute management.
Level of Evidence:
5
PMCID: PMC3362987  PMID: 22666650
Athletes; bleeding; integument; wounds
5.  ARE ALL PHYSICAL THERAPISTS QUALIFIED TO PROVIDE SIDELINE COVERAGE OF ATHLETIC EVENTS? 
The new graduate, or the licensed physical therapist with general orthopedic experience, is not qualified to provide sideline coverage at athletic events. Additional or advanced training in emergency care is essential to provide aid in acute situations. Completion of the First Responder certification prepares an individual to react appropriately to any emergency on the sidelines, in the clinic, or in the community. The highest qualification that a physical therapist can attain to ensure adequate preparation for the practice of Sports Physical therapy is the ABPTS Sports Certified Specialist (SCS) designation. This professional designation indicates that this individual is highly qualified to care for athletes at any level, from on the sidelines, through rehabilitation and return to play, regardless of the injury, age of the athlete, or skill level.
PMCID: PMC3273887  PMID: 22319685
Emergency care; sideline coverage; sports physical therapist
6.  CHEST INJURIES, WHAT THE SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPIST SHOULD KNOW 
Chest injuries in contact and collision sports are relatively rare, particularly those that are life threatening. However, as with every sports related injury, one must initially consider life threatening situations that may occur as a result of collision with another player, a stationary object, or being struck with some type of object (missile). In other words, as is the case in all acute sports injury assessment, the mechanism of injury must be considered when evaluating the injured athlete on the field as well as on the sidelines. The Sports Physical Therapist (PT) must look for several initial life threatening conditions as well as be aware of and monitor for the development of these symptoms during the subsequent evaluation of the athlete. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the presentation and management of several emergent conditions associated with injuries to the chest and thorax.
PMCID: PMC3230163  PMID: 22163097
Chest injury; commotio cordis; flail chest; pneumothorax
7.  THE USE OF CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION AND THE AUTOMATED EXTERNAL DEFIBRILLATOR IN THE PRACTICE OF SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY 
During the initial assessment of the injured athlete, the Sports Physical Therapist (PT) must first be concerned with life-threatening emergencies such as absence of breathing and pulse. The sports PT must also be aware of the possibility of “sudden cardiac death” that could occur in others, including coaches, officials, and fans. If the PT assumes the role of “most medical” person at the contest or event, the responsibility for life saving action falls squarely on their shoulders. Therefore, skills and ongoing certification in cardio- pulmonary resuscitation techniques and the use of an automated external defibrillator are a basic necessity. These skills are required as part of the specialty practice of sports PT (BLS Healthcare Provider course or CPR for the Professional Rescuer in addition to completion of the First Responder Course OR credentials as an EMT or ATC), and are mandatory for being qualified to sit for the exam to become a sports certified specialist (SCS) by the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties (ABPTS).3
PMCID: PMC3164003  PMID: 21904702
automated external defibrillator; cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency response
8.  THE RIDDELLTM RIPKORD SYSTEM FOR SHOULDER PAD REMOVAL IN A CERVICAL SPINE INJURED ATHLETE: A PARADIGM SHIFT 
Since the inception of the term Sports Medicine Athletic Trainers, Sports Physical Therapists, Paramedics, and Emergency Room Physicians have faced a number of challenges when it comes to providing care to an equipment laden athlete suspected of having a cervical spine or serious head injury. The same equipment that is designed to protect the player may significantly impede the medical team when it comes to diagnosing and treating cervical spine and head injuries. Incorrectly removing the helmet and shoulder pads from a football player with a cervical spine injury, may lead to unwanted motion of the cervical spine during removal. It is the purpose of this article to review the current concepts relating to equipment removal and to introduce a novel system for quick and easy removal of football shoulder pads called the Riddell™RipKord system.
PMCID: PMC3109891  PMID: 21712941
emergency management; cervical spine injury; equipment removal

Results 1-8 (8)