PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-4 (4)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  ANKLE DORSIFLEXION RANGE OF MOTION INFLUENCES DYNAMIC BALANCE IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY 
Purpose/Background:
Individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) often have impairments in ankle range of motion (ROM) and balance. There is limited evidence that these impairments are related in individuals with CAI. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between ankle dorsiflexion ROM and dynamic balance in individuals with CAI.
Methods:
Forty‐five participants (age=23.2±2.8 y, height=172.1±10.8 cm, mass=70.6±13.3 kg, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure Sport= 71.2±11.7, Modified Ankle Instability Instrument= 6.4±1.3) volunteered for this study. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM was measured in a weight‐bearing position while dynamic balance was measured using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) in the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions. Linear regression was used to determine the relationship between ankle dorsiflexion ROM and measures of dynamic balance.
Results:
There were fair positive correlations between dorsiflexion ROM and the anterior reach direction (r = .55, r2= .31, P < .001), posterolateral reach direction (r = .29, r2 = .09, P = .03), and the composite SEBT scores (r = .30, r2 = .09, P= .02). There was little or no relationship between ankle dorsiflexion and the posteromedial reach direction (r = .01, r2 = .001, P = .47).
Conclusions:
Ankle dorsiflexion ROM can influence dynamic balance, specifically the anterior reach portion of the SEBT.
Clinical Relevance:
Individuals with CAI who demonstrate impairments in dorsiflexion ROM may also demonstrate difficulty with portions of the SEBT. Clinicians may use this information to better optimize rehabilitation programs that address ankle dorsiflexion ROM and dynamic balance.
Level of Evidence:
5
PMCID: PMC3625791  PMID: 23593550
Ankle sprain; functional ankle instability; postural control
2.  AVOIDING MANUSCRIPT MISTAKES 
Writing a scientific manuscript can be a consuming, but rewarding task with a number of intrinsic and extrinsic benefits. The ability to write a scientific manuscript is typically not an emphasized component of most entry‐level professional programs. The purpose of this overview is to provide authors with suggestions to improve manuscript quality and to provide mechanisms to avoid common manuscript mistakes that are often identified by journal reviewers and editors.
PMCID: PMC3474299  PMID: 23091784
manuscript; scientific writing
3.  RELIABILITY OF THREE MEASURES OF ANKLE DORSIFLEXION RANGE OF MOTION 
Purpose/Background:
A variety of methods exist to measure ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM). Few studies have examined the reliability of a novice rater. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of ankle ROM measurements using three different techniques in a novice rater.
Methods:
Twenty healthy subjects (mean±SD, age=24±3 years, height=173.2±8.1 cm, mass=72.6±15.2 kg) participated in this study. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM measures were obtained in a weight-bearing lunge position using a standard goniometer, digital inclinometer, and a tape measure using the distance-to-wall technique. All measures were obtained three times per side, with 10 minutes of rest between the first and second set of measures. Intrarater reliability was determined using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,3) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI). Standard error of measurement (SEM) and the minimal detectable change (MDC) for each measurement technique were also calculated.
Results:
The within-session intrarater reliability (ICC2,3) estimates for each measure are as follows: tape measure (right 0.98, left 0.99), digital inclinometer (right 0.96; left 0.97), and goniometer (right 0.85; left 0.96). The SEM for the tape measure method ranged from 0.4–0.6 cm and the MDC was between 1.1–1.5 cm. The SEM for the inclinometer was between 1.3–1.4° and the MDC was 3.7–3.8°. The SEM for the goniometer ranged from 1.8–2.8° with an MDC of 5.0–7.7°.
Conclusions:
The results indicate that reliable measures of weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion ROM can be obtained from a novice rater. All three techniques had good reliability and low measurement error, with the distance-to-wall technique using a tape measure and inclinometer methods resulting in higher reliability coefficients (ICC2,3=0.96 to 0.99) and a lower SEM compared to the goniometer (ICC2,3=0.85 to 0.96).
Level of Evidence:
2b
PMCID: PMC3362988  PMID: 22666642
goniometry; inclinometer; talocrural joint
4.  THORACIC REGION SELF-MOBILIZATION: A CLINICAL SUGGESTION 
Limitations in thoracic spine motion may be due to restrictions in contractile or non-contractile tissues. Joint mobilizations are indicated when hypomobility of a joint (non-contractile tissue) is identified. The ability for a patient to perform self-mobilizations of the thoracic spine and ribs may help maximize intervention outcomes. The purpose of this article is to describe a low cost, portable device which can be used for thoracic spine self-mobilization techniques.
PMCID: PMC3325630  PMID: 22530198

Results 1-4 (4)