PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-2 (2)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  THE RIDDELLTM RIPKORD SYSTEM FOR SHOULDER PAD REMOVAL IN A CERVICAL SPINE INJURED ATHLETE: A PARADIGM SHIFT 
Since the inception of the term Sports Medicine Athletic Trainers, Sports Physical Therapists, Paramedics, and Emergency Room Physicians have faced a number of challenges when it comes to providing care to an equipment laden athlete suspected of having a cervical spine or serious head injury. The same equipment that is designed to protect the player may significantly impede the medical team when it comes to diagnosing and treating cervical spine and head injuries. Incorrectly removing the helmet and shoulder pads from a football player with a cervical spine injury, may lead to unwanted motion of the cervical spine during removal. It is the purpose of this article to review the current concepts relating to equipment removal and to introduce a novel system for quick and easy removal of football shoulder pads called the Riddell™RipKord system.
PMCID: PMC3109891  PMID: 21712941
emergency management; cervical spine injury; equipment removal
2.  AN UPDATE FOR THE CONSERVATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATELLOFEMORAL PAIN SYNDROME: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE FROM 2000 TO 2010 
Purpose/Background:
Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most common and clinically challenging knee pathologies. Historically, clinicians have used a myriad of interventions, many of which have benefited some but not all patients. Suboptimal outcomes may reflect the need for an evidence-based approach for the treatment of PFPS. The authors believe that integrating clinical expertise with the most current scientific data will enhance clinical practice. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide an update on the evidence for the conservative treatment of PFPS.
Methods:
The PubMed, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus databases were searched for studies published between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010. Studies used were any that utilized interventions lasting a minimum of 4 weeks for subjects with PFPS. Data were examined for subject sample, intervention duration, intervention type, and pain outcomes.
Results:
General quadriceps strengthening continues to reduce pain in patients with PFPS. Data are inconclusive regarding the use of patellar taping, patellar bracing, knee bracing, and foot orthosis. Although emerging data suggest the importance of hip strengthening exercise, ongoing investigations are needed to better understand its effect on PFPS.
Conclusions:
Current evidence supports the continued use of quadriceps exercise for the conservative management of PFPS. However, inconsistent or limited data regarding the other interventions precluded the authors' ability to make conclusive recommendations about their use. Future investigations should focus on identifying cohorts of patients with PFPS who may benefit from the other treatment approaches included in this systematic review.
PMCID: PMC3109895  PMID: 21713229
foot orthosis; hip exercise; knee; patella bracing; patella taping; quadriceps exercise

Results 1-2 (2)