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issn:2093-0.88
1.  Open surgical decompression of celiac axis compression by division of the median arcuate ligament 
Median arcuate ligament syndrome is a rare cause of abdominal pain which results from compression of the celiac artery (CA) or rarely, the superior mesenteric artery by a ligament formed by the right and left crura of the diaphragm. We report a case of open surgical decompression of the CA by division of the median arcuate ligament for a 37-year-old female patient who had suffered from chronic postprandial epigastric pain and severe weight loss. We described clinical features, characteristic angiographic findings and details of the surgical procedure for the patient with this rare vascular problem.
doi:10.4174/jkss.2013.85.2.93
PMCID: PMC3729994  PMID: 23908968
Median arcuate ligament; Celiac artery stenosis
2.  Treatment of failing vein grafts in patients who underwent lower extremity arterial bypass 
Purpose
We attempted to determine risk factors for the development of failing vein graft and optimal treatment in patients with infrainguinal vein grafts.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed a database of patients who underwent infrainguinal bypass using autogenous vein grafts due to chronic atherosclerotic arterial occlusive disease of lower extremity (LE) at a single institute between September 2003 and December 2011. After reviewing demographic, clinical, and angiographic features of the patients with failing grafts, we analyzed those variables to determine risk factors for the development of failing grafts. To determine an optimal treatment for the failing vein grafts, we compared results of open surgical repair (OSR), endovascular treatment (EVT) and conservative treatment.
Results
Two hundred and fifty-eight LE arterial bypasses using autogenous vein grafts in 242 patients were included in this study. During the follow-up period of 39 ± 25 months (range, 1 to 89 months), we found 166 (64%) patent grafts with no restenosis, 41 (15.9%) failing grafts, 39 (15.1%) graft occlusions, and 12 (4.7%) grafts lost in follow-up. In risk factor analysis for the development of a failing graft, no independent risk factors were identified. After 50 treatments of the 41 failing grafts (24 OSR, 18 EVT, 8 conservative management), graft occlusion was significantly more common in conservative treatment group and severe (>75%) restenosis was significantly more common following EVT than OSR (P = 0.001). Reintervention-free graft patency was also superior in the OSR group to that of the EVT group (87% vs. 42%, P = 0.015).
Conclusion
OSR of failing grafts has better outcomes than EVT or conservative management in treating failing grafts.
doi:10.4174/jkss.2012.83.5.307
PMCID: PMC3491233  PMID: 23166890
Lower extremity; Bypass; Failing graft; Stenosis; Graft occlusion
3.  Renal and abdominal visceral complications after open aortic surgery requiring supra-renal aortic cross clamping 
Purpose
The aim of this study was to assess renal or abdominal visceral complications after open aortic surgery (OAS) requiring supra-renal aortic cross clamping (SRACC).
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 66 patients who underwent SRACC. Among them, 17 followed supra-celiac aortic cross clamping (SCACC) procedure, 42 supra-renal, and 7 inter-renal aorta. Postoperative renal, hepatic or pancreatic complications were investigated by reviewing levels of serum creatinine and hepatic and pancreatic enzymes. Preoperative clinical and operative variables were analyzed to determine risk factors for postoperative renal insufficiency (PORI).
Results
Indications for SRACC were 25 juxta-renal aortic occlusion and 41 aortic aneurysms (24 juxta-renal, 12 supra-renal and 5 type IV thoraco-abdominal). The mean duration of renal ischemic time (RIT) was 30.1 ± 22.2 minutes (range, 3 to 120 minutes). PORI developed in 21% of patients, including four patients requiring hemodialysis (HD). However, chronic HD was required for only one patient (1.5%) who had preoperative renal insufficiency. RIT ≥ 25 minutes and SCACC were significant risk factors for PORI development by univariate analysis, but not by multivariate analysis. Serum pancreatic and hepatic enzyme was elevated in 41% and 53% of the 17 patients who underwent SCACC, respectively.
Conclusion
Though postoperative renal or abdominal visceral complications developed often after SRACC, we found that most of those complications resolved spontaneously unless there was preexisting renal disease or the aortic clamping time was exceptionally long.
doi:10.4174/jkss.2012.83.3.162
PMCID: PMC3433553  PMID: 22977763
Renal insufficiency; Visceral ischemia; Abdominal aortic aneurysm; Aortic occlusive disease; Suprarenal aortic cross clamping
4.  Risk factors for delayed recanalization of calf vein thrombosis 
Purpose
To determine the risk factors of delayed recanalization of isolated calf vein thrombosis (CVT).
Methods
One hundred fifty limbs of 110 patients with CVT between September 2007 and April 2010 were enrolled. We used ultrasonography for the diagnosis and follow-up examinations of CVT. We calculated recanalization rates at 1 and 3 months after initial diagnosis and analyzed the risk factors associated with delayed recanalization of CVT.
Results
CVTs were located in the muscular calf vein in 110 (73.3%), in the deep calf vein in 18 (12%), and in both in 22 cases (14.7%). Among all CVTs, 94 limbs (63%) were symptomatic. Major risk factors for CVT were orthopedic surgery (87.3%), malignancy (21.3%), and immobilization (15.3%). Sixty-seven patients (60.9%) were treated with oral anticoagulation therapy, while 43 patients by low molecular weight heparin (n = 19) or by conservative methods including elastic compression stockings and ambulation (n = 21). The cumulative recanalization rate at 1 and 3 months was 23% and 82% and it was significantly higher in patients who underwent oral anticoagulation therapy compared with patients without oral anticoagulation therapy (84% vs. 65%, P = 0.008 by log-rank test). Malignancy (odds ratio [OR], 2.789; P = 0.043) and immobilization (OR, 4.191; P = 0.029) were independent risk factors for delayed recanalization of CVT and oral anticoagulation (OR, 0.300; P = 0.020) was an independent factor in promoting recanalization in multivariate analysis.
Conclusion
For patients with isolated CVT, no oral anticoagulation resulted in higher rates of delayed recanalization compared to oral anticoagulation treatment. Immobilization and having malignancy were independent risk factors for delayed recanalization.
doi:10.4174/jkss.2012.82.5.306
PMCID: PMC3341480  PMID: 22563538
Thrombosis; Venous thrombosis; Deep vein thrombosis
5.  Spontaneous aortic rupture in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 
Neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder occurring in 1 in 3,000 individuals. Vasculopathy is a rarely reported finding in patients with NF-1. Here, we report a case of recurrent aortic pseudoaneurysm after endovascular aneurysm repair in a 49-year-old male patient with NF-1. On the sixth postoperative day following a successful open surgical repair of an aortic pseudoaneurysm, he developed hemoperitoneum due to a delayed rupture of the mesenteric artery branch. This was treated with endovascular coil embolization. We report the clinical features and histologic findings of this rare vascular disorder with a review of the relevant literature.
doi:10.4174/jkss.2012.82.4.261
PMCID: PMC3319782  PMID: 22493769
Aortic aneurysm; Aortic rupture; Neurofibromatosis 1
6.  Measurement of carotid artery stenosis: correlation analysis between B-mode ultrasonography and contrast arteriography 
Purpose
To evaluate the efficacy of B-mode ultrasonography (US) in measurement of carotid stenosis% (CS%).
Methods
One hundred and thirth-three carotid arteries in 96 patients who underwent both carotid US and carotid arteriography (CA) were included in this retrospective study. To measure CS% on US, a cross sectional view of the most stenotic segment of the internal carotid artery was captured and residual diameter and original diameter of that segment were measured with electronic caliper on the same plane and in the same direction. To measure CS% on an angiogram, we used European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST) and the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET) methods. Pearson's correlation analysis and linear regression analysis were used to determine the correlation between CS% on an US and angiogram.
Results
Pearson's correlation coefficient (R) between CS% measured in US and CA were 0.853 (ECST method, P < 0.001) and 0.828 (NASCET method, P < 0.001). Accuracies of B-mode US were 93.2%, 88.0%, and 81.2% for estimating CS% by ECST method and 86.5%, 82.7%, and 82% for estimating CS% by NASCET method.
Conclusion
CS% measured in B-mode US was simpler and showed a strong positive correlation with that measured on an arteriogram either ECST or NASCET method.
doi:10.4174/jkss.2011.80.5.348
PMCID: PMC3204697  PMID: 22066059
Carotid stenosis; Ultrasonography; Accuracy; Arteriography

Results 1-6 (6)