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1.  Aurora A kinase expression is increased in leukemia stem cells, and a selective Aurora A kinase inhibitor enhances Ara-C-induced apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia stem cells 
The Korean Journal of Hematology  2012;47(3):178-185.
Background
The overexpression of Aurora A kinase (AurA) has been reported in various malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the expression of AurA and the effects of AurA inhibition in cancer stem cells are not yet fully understood. We investigated the expression and inhibition of AurA in AML stem cells (CD34+/CD38-).
Methods
Expression of AurA was investigated in cell lines (NB4 and KG1) that express high levels of CD34 and low levels of CD38. Primary AML cells were harvested from 8 patients. The expression of AurA and cell death induced by inhibition of AurA were analyzed in CD34+/CD38- cells.
Results
AurA was shown to be overexpressed in both primary AML cells and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) compared to normal hematopoietic stem cells. Inhibition of AurA plus cytarabine treatment in LSCs resulted in increased cytotoxicity compared to cytarabine treatment alone. Additional stimulation with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) increased the cell death caused by AurA inhibition plus cytarabine treatment.
Conclusion
To our knowledge, this is the first report describing increased expression of AurA in LSCs. Our results suggest that selective AurA inhibition may be used to reduce LSCs, and this reduction may be enhanced by stimulation with G-CSF. Further exploration of relationship between nuclear factor kappa-B and AurA inhibition and the potential of AurA inhibition for use in leukemia treatment is needed.
doi:10.5045/kjh.2012.47.3.178
PMCID: PMC3464334  PMID: 23071472
Acute myeloid leukemia; Leukemia stem cell; Aurora kinase
2.  Clinical significance of B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) in acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation 
The Korean Journal of Hematology  2011;46(3):175-179.
Background
BAFF (B cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) are members of the tumor necrosis factor family and promote B cell survival and proliferation. We evaluated the correlation between serum concentration of BAFF or APRIL and severity of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).
Methods
Fifteen patients who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem transplantation for leukemia and developed acute GVHD were enrolled. We determined serum concentrations of BAFF and APRIL at the onset of the first clinical manifestation of GVHD by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
Results
Nine patients had grade 2 acute GVHD, and 6 had grade 3-4 acute GVHD. The BAFF serum concentration was higher in patients with grade 3-4 acute GVHD (1,093.42 in grade 2 vs. 2,171.99 pg/mL in grade 3-4), although the difference was not significant (P=0.077). However, the ratio of BAFF serum concentration to absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) (BAFF/ALC) was significantly higher in patients with grade 3-4 acute GVHD (P=0.045). The APRIL serum concentration and APRIL/ALC ratio showed similar results (P=0.077 and P=0.013, respectively).
Conclusion
Patients with grade 3-4 acute GVHD had higher BAFF/ALC and APRIL/ALC ratios than patients with grade 2 acute GVHD. These findings suggest that B cells might play an important role in the development of acute GVHD, and that the BAFF and APRIL concentrations in serum might be significant predictive factors for estimating the severity of acute GVHD. Their clinical significance should be further evaluated in a larger patient population.
doi:10.5045/kjh.2011.46.3.175
PMCID: PMC3208200  PMID: 22065972
B cell-activating factor (BAFF); A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL); Acute graft-versus-host disease; Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
3.  Primary renal aspergillosis and renal stones in both kidneys associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant 
The Korean Journal of Hematology  2010;45(4):275-278.
Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a leading cause of infectious mortality in patients who have undergone a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT); the mortality due to IA ranges from 70% to 93% in HSCT patients. Early diagnosis and treatment are the cornerstones for the good prognosis of IA. Primary renal aspergillosis is an extremely rare presentation in patients who have undergone HSCT, and the risk factor for this uncommon presentation is not well known. We report a patient who developed primary renal aspergillosis and renal stones in both the kidneys after HSCT. Invasive renal aspergillosis was diagnosed after a nephrectomy, which was performed to treat massive renal hematoma.
doi:10.5045/kjh.2010.45.4.275
PMCID: PMC3023055  PMID: 21253431
Primary renal aspergillosis; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Renal stones

Results 1-3 (3)