PMCC PMCC

Search tips
Search criteria

Advanced
Results 1-4 (4)
 

Clipboard (0)
None
Journals
Authors
more »
Year of Publication
Document Types
1.  Methods for Estimation of Radiation Risk in Epidemiological Studies Accounting for Classical and Berkson Errors in Doses 
With a binary response Y, the dose-response model under consideration is logistic in flavor with pr(Y=1 | D) = R (1+R)−1, R = λ0 + EAR D, where λ0 is the baseline incidence rate and EAR is the excess absolute risk per gray. The calculated thyroid dose of a person i is expressed as Dimes=fiQimes/Mimes. Here, Qimes is the measured content of radioiodine in the thyroid gland of person i at time tmes, Mimes is the estimate of the thyroid mass, and fi is the normalizing multiplier. The Qi and Mi are measured with multiplicative errors ViQ and ViM, so that Qimes=QitrViQ (this is classical measurement error model) and Mitr=MimesViM (this is Berkson measurement error model). Here, Qitr is the true content of radioactivity in the thyroid gland, and Mitr is the true value of the thyroid mass. The error in fi is much smaller than the errors in ( Qimes, Mimes) and ignored in the analysis.
By means of Parametric Full Maximum Likelihood and Regression Calibration (under the assumption that the data set of true doses has lognormal distribution), Nonparametric Full Maximum Likelihood, Nonparametric Regression Calibration, and by properly tuned SIMEX method we study the influence of measurement errors in thyroid dose on the estimates of λ0 and EAR. The simulation study is presented based on a real sample from the epidemiological studies. The doses were reconstructed in the framework of the Ukrainian-American project on the investigation of Post-Chernobyl thyroid cancers in Ukraine, and the underlying subpolulation was artificially enlarged in order to increase the statistical power. The true risk parameters were given by the values to earlier epidemiological studies, and then the binary response was simulated according to the dose-response model.
doi:10.2202/1557-4679.1281
PMCID: PMC3058406  PMID: 21423564
Berkson measurement error; Chornobyl accident; classical measurement error; estimation of radiation risk; full maximum likelihood estimating procedure; regression calibration; SIMEX estimator; uncertainties in thyroid dose
2.  Fitting a Bivariate Measurement Error Model for Episodically Consumed Dietary Components 
There has been great public health interest in estimating usual, i.e., long-term average, intake of episodically consumed dietary components that are not consumed daily by everyone, e.g., fish, red meat and whole grains. Short-term measurements of episodically consumed dietary components have zero-inflated skewed distributions. So-called two-part models have been developed for such data in order to correct for measurement error due to within-person variation and to estimate the distribution of usual intake of the dietary component in the univariate case. However, there is arguably much greater public health interest in the usual intake of an episodically consumed dietary component adjusted for energy (caloric) intake, e.g., ounces of whole grains per 1000 kilo-calories, which reflects usual dietary composition and adjusts for different total amounts of caloric intake. Because of this public health interest, it is important to have models to fit such data, and it is important that the model-fitting methods can be applied to all episodically consumed dietary components.
We have recently developed a nonlinear mixed effects model (Kipnis, et al., 2010), and have fit it by maximum likelihood using nonlinear mixed effects programs and methodology (the SAS NLMIXED procedure). Maximum likelihood fitting of such a nonlinear mixed model is generally slow because of 3-dimensional adaptive Gaussian quadrature, and there are times when the programs either fail to converge or converge to models with a singular covariance matrix. For these reasons, we develop a Monte-Carlo (MCMC) computation of fitting this model, which allows for both frequentist and Bayesian inference. There are technical challenges to developing this solution because one of the covariance matrices in the model is patterned. Our main application is to the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP Diet and Health Study, where we illustrate our methods for modeling the energy-adjusted usual intake of fish and whole grains. We demonstrate numerically that our methods lead to increased speed of computation, converge to reasonable solutions, and have the flexibility to be used in either a frequentist or a Bayesian manner.
doi:10.2202/1557-4679.1267
PMCID: PMC3406506  PMID: 22848190
Bayesian approach; latent variables; measurement error; mixed effects models; nutritional epidemiology; zero-inflated data
3.  Statistical Methods for Comparative Phenomics Using High-Throughput Phenotype Microarrays* 
We propose statistical methods for comparing phenomics data generated by the Biolog Phenotype Microarray (PM) platform for high-throughput phenotyping. Instead of the routinely used visual inspection of data with no sound inferential basis, we develop two approaches. The first approach is based on quantifying the distance between mean or median curves from two treatments and then applying a permutation test; we also consider a permutation test applied to areas under mean curves. The second approach employs functional principal component analysis. Properties of the proposed methods are investigated on both simulated data and data sets from the PM platform.
doi:10.2202/1557-4679.1227
PMCID: PMC2942029  PMID: 20865133
functional data analysis; principal components; permutation tests; phenotype microarrays; high-throughput phenotyping; phenomics; Biolog
4.  A Note on the Effect on Power of Score Tests via Dimension Reduction by Penalized Regression under the Null* 
We consider the problem of score testing for certain low dimensional parameters of interest in a model that could include finite but high dimensional secondary covariates and associated nuisance parameters. We investigate the possibility of the potential gain in power by reducing the dimensionality of the secondary variables via oracle estimators such as the Adaptive Lasso. As an application, we use a recently developed framework for score tests of association of a disease outcome with an exposure of interest in the presence of a possible interaction of the exposure with other co-factors of the model. We derive the local power of such tests and show that if the primary and secondary predictors are independent, then having an oracle estimator does not improve the local power of the score test. Conversely, if they are dependent, there is the potential for power gain. Simulations are used to validate the theoretical results and explore the extent of correlation needed between the primary and secondary covariates to observe an improvement of the power of the test by using the oracle estimator. Our conclusions are likely to hold more generally beyond the model of interactions considered here.
doi:10.2202/1557-4679.1231
PMCID: PMC2854087  PMID: 20405045
Adaptive Lasso; gene-environment interactions; Lasso; model selection; oracle estimation; score tests

Results 1-4 (4)