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1.  Trace methane oxidation studied in several Euryarchaeota under diverse conditions 
Archaea  2004;1(5):303-309.
We used 13C-labeled methane to document the extent of trace methane oxidation by Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Archaeoglobus lithotrophicus, Archaeoglobus profundus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina acetivorans. The results indicate trace methane oxidation during growth varied among different species and among methanogen cultures grown on different substrates. The extent of trace methane oxidation by Mb. thermoautotrophicum (0.05 ± 0.04%, ± 2 standard deviations of the methane produced during growth) was less than that by M. barkeri (0.15 ± 0.04%), grown under similar conditions with H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina acetivorans oxidized more methane during growth on trimethylamine (0.36 ± 0.05%) than during growth on methanol (0.07 ± 0.03%). This may indicate that, in M. acetivorans, either a methyltransferase related to growth on trimethylamine plays a role in methane oxidation, or that methanol is an intermediate of methane oxidation. Addition of possible electron acceptors (O2, NO3–, SO22–, SO32–) or H2 to the headspace did not substantially enhance or diminish methane oxidation in M. acetivorans cultures. Separate growth experiments with FAD and NAD+ showed that inclusion of these electron carriers also did not enhance methane oxidation. Our results suggest trace methane oxidized during methanogenesis cannot be coupled to the reduction of these electron acceptors in pure cultures, and that the mechanism by which methane is oxidized in methanogens is independent of H2 concentration. In contrast to the methanogens, species of the sulfate-reducing genus Archaeoglobus did not significantly oxidize methane during growth (oxidizing 0.003 ± 0.01% of the methane provided to A. fulgidus, 0.002 ± 0.009% to A. lithotrophicus and 0.003 ± 0.02% to A. profundus). Lack of observable methane oxidation in the three Archaeoglobus species examined may indicate that methyl-coenzyme M reductase, which is not present in this genus, is required for the anaerobic oxidation of methane, consistent with the “reverse methanogenesis” hypothesis.
PMCID: PMC2685550  PMID: 15876563
anaerobic methane oxidation; Archaeoglobus; methanogen; reverse methanogenesis; stable isotope label
2.  Novel RepA-MCM proteins encoded in plasmids pTAU4, pORA1 and pTIK4 from Sulfolobus neozealandicus  
Archaea  2004;1(5):319-325.
Three plasmids isolated from the crenarchaeal thermoacidophile Sulfolobus neozealandicus were characterized. Plasmids pTAU4 (7,192 bp), pORA1 (9,689 bp) and pTIK4 (13,638 bp) show unusual properties that distinguish them from previously characterized cryptic plasmids of the genus Sulfolobus. Plasmids pORA1 and pTIK4 encode RepA proteins, only the former of which carries the novel polymerase–primase domain of other known Sulfolobus plasmids. Plasmid pTAU4 encodes a mini-chromosome maintenance protein homolog and no RepA protein; the implications for DNA replication are considered. Plasmid pORA1 is the first Sulfolobus plasmid to be characterized that does not encode the otherwise highly conserved DNA-binding PlrA protein. Another encoded protein appears to be specific for the New Zealand plasmids. The three plasmids should provide useful model systems for functional studies of these important crenarchaeal proteins.
PMCID: PMC2685554  PMID: 15876565
chemotaxis; crenarchaeal plasmid; DNA replicase; MCM protein
3.  Identification of replication origins in archaeal genomes based on the Z-curve method 
Archaea  2004;1(5):335-346.
The Z-curve is a three-dimensional curve that constitutes a unique representation of a DNA sequence, i.e., both the Z-curve and the given DNA sequence can be uniquely reconstructed from the other. We employed Z-curve analysis to identify one replication origin in the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii genome, two replication origins in the Halobacterium species NRC-1 genome and one replication origin in the Methanosarcina mazei genome. One of the predicted replication origins of Halobacterium species NRC-1 is the same as a replication origin later identified by in vivo experiments. The Z-curve analysis of the Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 genome suggested the existence of three replication origins, which is also consistent with later experimental results. This review aims to summarize applications of the Z-curve in identifying replication origins of archaeal genomes, and to provide clues about the locations of as yet unidentified replication origins of the Aeropyrum pernix K1, Methanococcus maripaludis S2, Picrophilus torridus DSM 9790 and Pyrobaculum aerophilum str. IM2 genomes.
PMCID: PMC2685548  PMID: 15876567
Halobacterium; Methanocaldococcus jannaschii; Methanosarcina mazei
4.  Recombinant production of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvatedecarboxylase in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii  
Archaea  2004;1(5):327-334.
The unusual physiological properties of archaea (e.g., growth in extreme salt concentration, temperature and pH) make them ideal platforms for metabolic engineering. Towards the ultimate goal of modifying an archaeon to produce bioethanol or other useful products, the pyruvate decarboxylase gene of Zymomonas mobilis (Zm pdc) was expressed in Haloferax volcanii. This gene has been used successfully to channel pyruvate to ethanol in various Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli. Although the ionic strength of the H. volcanii cytosol differs over 15-fold from that of E. coli, gel filtration and circular dichroism revealed no difference in secondary structure between the ZmPDC protein isolated from either of these hosts. Like the E. coli purified enzyme, ZmPDC from H. volcanii catalyzed the nonoxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate. A decrease in the amount of soluble ZmPDC protein was detected as H. volcanii transitioned from log phase to late stationary phase that was inversely proportional to the amount of pdc-specific mRNA. Based on these results, proteins from non-halophilic organisms can be actively synthesized in haloarchaea; however, post-transcriptional mechanisms present in stationary phase appear to limit the amount of recombinant protein expressed.
PMCID: PMC2685553  PMID: 15876566
biotechnology; ethanol; halophile; metabolism; molecular biology; recombinant protein
5.  Active site of Zn2+-dependent sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 
Archaea  2004;1(5):311-317.
The enzyme sn-glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gro1PDH, EC 1.1.1.261) is key to the formation of the enantiomeric configuration of the glycerophosphate backbone (sn-glycerol-1-phosphate) of archaeal ether lipids. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible conversion between dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glycerol-1-phosphate. To date, no information about the active site and catalytic mechanism of this enzyme has been reported. Using the sequence and structural information for glycerol dehydrogenase, we constructed six mutants (D144N, D144A, D191N, H271A, H287A and D191N/H271A) of Gro1PDH from Aeropyrum pernix K1 and examined their characteristics to clarify the active site of this enzyme. The enzyme was found to be a zinc-dependent metalloenzyme, containing one zinc ion for every monomer protein that was essential for activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of D144 increased the activity of the enzyme. Mutants D144N and D144A exhibited low affinity for the substrates and higher activity than the wild type, but their affinity for the zinc ion was the same as that of the wild type. Mutants D191N, H271A and H287A had a low affinity for the zinc ion and a low activity compared with the wild type. The double mutation, D191N/ H271A, had no enzyme activity and bound no zinc. From these results, it was clarified that residues D191, H271 and H287 participate in the catalytic activity of the enzyme by binding the zinc ion, and that D144 has an effect on substrate binding. The structure of the active site of Gro1PDH from A. pernix K1 seems to be similar to that of glycerol dehydrogenase, despite the differences in substrate specificity and biological role.
PMCID: PMC2685552  PMID: 15876564
glycerophosphate backbone; metalloenzyme; zinc
6.  Biosynthesis of ribose-5-phosphate and erythrose-4-phosphate in archaea: a phylogenetic analysis of archaeal genomes 
Archaea  2004;1(5):347-352.
A phylogenetic analysis of the genes encoding enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway, and the chorismate pathway of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, employing data from 13 complete archaeal genomes, provides a potential explanation for the enigmatic phylogenetic patterns of the PPP genes in archaea. Genomic and biochemical evidence suggests that three archaeal species (Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Thermoplasma acidophilum and Thermoplasma volcanium) produce ribose-5-phosphate via the nonoxidative PPP (NOPPP), whereas nine species apparently lack an NOPPP but may employ a reverse RuMP pathway for pentose synthesis. One species (Halobacterium sp. NRC-1) lacks both the NOPPP and the RuMP pathway but may possess a modified oxidative PPP (OPPP), the details of which are not yet known. The presence of transketolase in several archaeal species that are missing the other two NOPPP genes can be explained by the existence of differing requirements for erythrose-4-phosphate (E4P) among archaea: six species use transketolase to make E4P as a precursor to aromatic amino acids, six species apparently have an alternate biosynthetic pathway and may not require the ability to make E4P, and one species (Pyrococcus horikoshii) probably does not synthesize aromatic amino acids at all.
PMCID: PMC2685555  PMID: 15876568
aromatic amino acid biosynthesis; chorismate; genomic analysis; nucleotide biosynthesis; pentose phosphate pathway; ribulose-5-phosphate; transketolase
7.  Hydrolase and glycosynthase activity of endo-1,3-β-glucanase from the thermophile Pyrococcus furiosus  
Archaea  2004;1(4):285-292.
Pyrococcus furiosus laminarinase (LamA, PF0076) is an endo-glycosidase that hydrolyzes β-1,3-gluco-oligosaccharides, but not β-1,4-gluco-oligosaccharides. We studied the specificity of LamA towards small saccharides by using 4-methylumbelliferyl β-glucosides with different linkages. Besides endo-activity, wild-type LamA has some exo-activity, and catalyzes the hydrolysis of mixed-linked oligosaccharides (Glcβ4Glcβ3Glcβ-MU (Glc = glucosyl, MU = 4-methylumbelliferyl)) with both β-1,4 and β-1,3 specificities. The LamA mutant E170A had severely reduced hydrolytic activity, which is consistent with Glu170 being the catalytic nucleophile. The E170A mutant was active as a glycosynthase, catalyzing the condensation of α-laminaribiosyl fluoride to different acceptors. The best condensation yields were found at pH 6.5 and 50 °C, but did not exceed 30%. Depending on the acceptor, the synthase generated either a β-1,3 or a β-1,4 linkage.
PMCID: PMC2685573  PMID: 15810439
enzymatic synthesis; glycosyl fluoride; glycosylation; glycosynthase mutant; hydrolysis; laminarinase; nucleophile
8.  A proposal to rename the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus woesei as Pyrococcus furiosus subsp. woesei  
Archaea  2004;1(4):277-283.
Pyrococcus species are hyperthermophilic members of the order Thermococcales, with optimal growth temperatures approaching 100 °C. All species grow heterotrophically and produce H2 or, in the presence of elemental sulfur (S°), H2S. Pyrococcus woesei and P. furiosus were isolated from marine sediments at the same Vulcano Island beach site and share many morphological and physiological characteristics. We report here that the rDNA operons of these strains have identical sequences, including their intergenic spacer regions and part of the 23S rRNA. Both species grow rapidly and produce H2 in the presence of 0.1% maltose and 10–100 µM sodium tungstate in S°-free medium. However,P. woesei shows more extensive autolysis than P. furiosus in the stationary phase. Pyrococcus furiosus and P. woesei share three closely related families of insertion sequences (ISs). A Southern blot performed with IS probes showed extensive colinearity between the genomes of P. woesei and P. furiosus. Cloning and sequencing of ISsthat were in different contexts in P. woesei and P. furiosus revealed that the napA gene in P. woesei is disrupted by a type III IS element, whereas in P. furiosus, this gene is intact. A type I IS element, closely linked to the napA gene, was observed in the same context in both P. furiosus and P. woesei genomes. Our results suggest that the IS elements are implicated in genomic rearrangements and reshuffling in these closely related strains. We propose to rename P. woesei a subspecies of P. furiosus based on their identical rDNA operon sequences, many common IS elements that are shared genomic markers, and the observation that all P. woesei nucleotide sequences deposited in GenBank to date are > 99% identical to P. furiosus sequences.
PMCID: PMC2685572  PMID: 15810438
hyperthermophile; sulfur reduction; transposon
9.  Genomic comparison of archaeal conjugative plasmids from Sulfolobus  
Archaea  2004;1(4):231-239.
All of the known self-transmissable plasmids of the Archaea have been found in the genus Sulfolobus. To gain more insight into archaeal conjugative processes, four newly isolated self-transmissable plasmids, pKEF9, pHVE14, pARN3 and pARN4, were sequenced and subjected to a comparative sequence analysis with two earlier sequenced plasmids, pNOB8 and pING1. The analyses revealed three conserved and functionally distinct sections in the genomes. Section A is considered to encode the main components of the conjugative apparatus, where two genes show low but significant sequence similarity to sections of genes encoding bacterial conjugative proteins. A putative origin of replication is located in section B, which is highly conserved in sequence and contains several perfect and imperfect direct and inverted repeats. Further downstream, in section C, an operon encoding six to nine smaller proteins is implicated in the initiation and regulation of replication. Each plasmid carries an integrase gene of the type that does not partition on integration, and there is strong evidence for their integration into host chromosomes, where they may facilitate intercellular exchange of chromosomal genes. Two plasmids contain hexameric short regularly spaced repeats (SRSR), which have been implicated in plasmid maintenance, and each plasmid carries multiple recombination motifs, concentrated in the variable regions, which likely provide sites for genomic rearrangements.
PMCID: PMC2685578  PMID: 15810432
pARN3; pARN4; pHVE14; pKEF9; SRSR cluster
10.  The conserved adenosine in helix 6 of Archaeoglobus fulgidus signal recognition particle RNA initiates SRP assembly 
Archaea  2004;1(4):269-275.
The signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA helix 6 of archaea and eukaryotes is essential for the binding of protein SRP19 and the assembly of a functional complex. The conserved adenosine at the third position of the tetraloop of helix 6 (A149) is crucial for the binding of protein SRP19 in the mammalian SRP. Here we investigated the significance of the equivalent adenosine residue at position 159 (A159) of Archaeoglobus fulgidus SRP RNA. The A159 of A. fulgidus and A149 of human SRP RNA were changed to C, G or U, and fragments containing helix 6 or helices 6 and 8 were synthesized by run-off transcription with T7 RNA polymerase. The ability of recombinant A. fulgidus and human SRP19 to form ribonucleoprotein complexes was measured in vitro. The simultaneous presence of A149 and helix 8 is required for the high-affinity binding of SRP19 to the human SRP RNA. In contrast, A. fulgidus SRP19 binds to the SRP RNA fragments with high affinity irrespective of the nature of the nucleotide, demonstrating that A159 does not directly participate in protein binding. Instead, as indicated by the resistance of the wild-type A. fulgidus RNA towards digestion by RNase A, this residue allows the formation of a tightly folded RNA molecule. The high affinity between A. fulgidus SRP19 and RNA molecules that contain both helices 6 and 8 suggests that A159 is likely to initiate archaeal SRP assembly by forming a conserved tertiary RNA– RNA interaction.
PMCID: PMC2685576  PMID: 15810437
protein–RNA interactions; site-directed mutagenesis; tetraloop
11.  Description of Thermococcus kodakaraensis sp. nov., a well studied hyperthermophilic archaeon previously reported as Pyrococcus sp. KOD1 
Archaea  2004;1(4):263-267.
A hyperthermophilic archaeal strain, KOD1, isolated from a solfatara on Kodakara Island, Japan, has previously been reported as Pyrococcus sp. KOD1. However, a detailed phylogenetic tree, made possible by the recent accumulation of 16S rRNA sequences of various species in the order Thermococcales, indicated that strain KOD1 is a member of the genus Thermococcus. We performed DNA–DNA hybridization tests against species that displayed high similarity in terms of 16S ribosomal DNA sequences, including Thermococcus peptonophilus and Thermococcus stetteri. Hybridization results and differences in growth characteristics and substrate utilization differentiated strain KOD1 from T. peptonophilus and T. stetteri at the species level. Our results indicate that strain KOD1 represents a new species of Thermococcus, which we designate as Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 sp. nov.
PMCID: PMC2685570  PMID: 15810436
Archaea; classification; hyperthermophile; taxonomy; Thermococcales
12.  Transaldolase of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii  
Archaea  2004;1(4):255-262.
The Methanocaldococcus jannaschii genome contains putative genes for all four nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway enzymes. Open reading frame (ORF) MJ0960 is a member of the mipB/talC family of ‘transaldolase-like’ genes, so named because of their similarity to the well-characterized transaldolase B gene family. However, recently, it has been reported that both the mipB and the talC genes from Escherichia coli encode novel enzymes with fructose-6-phosphate aldolase activity, not transaldolase activity (Schürmann and Sprenger 2001). The same study reports that other members of the mipB/talC family appear to encode transaldolases. To confirm the function of MJ0960 and to clarify the presence of a nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway in M. jannaschii, we have cloned ORF MJ0960 from M. jannaschii genomic DNA and purified the recombinant protein. MJ0960 encodes a transaldolase and displays no fructose-6-phosphate aldolase activity. It retained full activity for 4 h at 80 °C, and for 3 weeks at 25 °C. Methanocaldococcus jannaschii transaldolase has a maximal velocity (Vmax) of 1.0 ± 0.2 µmol min–1 mg–1 at 25 °C, whereas Vmax = 12.0 ± 0.5 µmol min–1 mg–1 at 50 °C. Apparent Michaelis constants at 50 °C were Km = 0.65 ± 0.09 mM for fructose-6-phosphate and Km = 27.8 ± 4.3 µM for erythrose-4-phosphate. When ribose-5-phosphate replaced erythrose-4-phosphate as an aldose acceptor, Vmax decreased twofold, whereas the Km was 150-fold higher. The molecular mass of the active enzyme is 271 ± 27 kDa as estimated by gel filtration, whereas the predicted monomer size is 23.96 kDa, suggesting that the native form of the protein is probably a decamer. A readily available source of thermophilic pentose phosphate pathway enzymes including transaldolase may have direct application in enzymatic biohydrogen production.
PMCID: PMC2685571  PMID: 15810435
biohydrogen; fructose-6-phosphate aldolase; fsa; mipB; pentose phosphate pathway; talC
13.  Interactions between RNase P protein subunits in Archaea 
Archaea  2004;1(4):247-254.
A yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify protein–protein interactions between the ribonuclease P (RNase P) protein subunits Mth11p, Mth687p, Mth688p and Mth1618p from the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus. Clear interactions between Mth688p and Mth687p, and between Mth1618p and Mth11p, were confirmed by HIS3 and LacZ reporter expression. Weaker interactions of Mth687p and Mth688p with Mth11p, and Mth11p with itself, are also suggested. These interactions resemble, and confirm, those previously seen among the homologs of these proteins in the more complex yeast RNase P holoenzyme.
PMCID: PMC2685574  PMID: 15810434
archaebacteria; MTH11; MTH1618; MTH687; MTH688; ribonuclease P

Results 1-13 (13)